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Frank Blair : Lincoln's conservative /
William E. Parrish.
imprint
Columbia : University of Missouri Press, c1998.
description
xv, 318 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0826211569 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Columbia : University of Missouri Press, c1998.
isbn
0826211569 (alk. paper)
general note
Series statement taken from jacket.
catalogue key
1832797
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 291-310) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1998-07:
The Blairs influenced mid-19th century politics in ways that invite comparison to the Gores or Bushes. Francis Preston Blair was a Jacksonian editor, and his sons Montgomery and Frank Blair had significant political roles. Frank Blair, the younger son, came of age in pre-Civil War Missouri, was a Union officer fighting in the decisive 1864 campaigns, and was active in national Reconstruction politics. Lawyer, newspaper editor, and professional politician, Blair influenced Missouri's decision to remain with the Union and tried to persuade Lincoln to be conservative on racial issues. In postwar politics Frank Blair opposed radical Republicanism of the late 1860s, and in 1868 he ran as the vice presidential nominee of the Democratic party. The author used manuscript sources, newspapers, and a vast secondary literature. His principal contribution is an enhanced understanding of Missouri and national politics of the era. Biography may not have been the best genre for Parrish's effort. Insight into the person is missing. Blair's wife is frequently mentioned, but apart from acknowledging the births of the eight children and reference to the financial and emotional distress Blair's consuming interest in politics caused his family, the personal side of his life is largely undeveloped. Upper-division undergraduates and above. T. F. Armstrong; Texas Wesleyan University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Every man in Missouri, whatever his politics, his religion, or his beverage . . . has reason to believe that a braver man than Frank Blair never set foot on Missouri soil or any other soil. No one hereabouts whose hope of eternal life was not well assured, would ever think of drawing a knife or pistol on Frank."-Anonymous Missourian to a reporter for the New York Sun
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 1998
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Known for his fearlessness in both the political arena and the battlefield, Frank Blair is a Missouri legend. As a member of one of the most prominent and powerful political families in America during the nineteenth century, possibly the equivalent of the twentieth-century Kennedys, Frank was steeped in politics at an early age. The youngest son of Francis Preston Blair, editor of Andrew Jackson's Washington Globe and adviser to Presidents Andrew Jackson through Andrew Johnson, Frank Blair was greatly influenced by his father, who had high political expectations of him. Volatile and combative, Blair was either strongly admired or hated by the public figures of his day. He held adamantly to his opinions and fought hard for his political causes. He was an ardent supporter of Abraham Lincoln and championed the president's program in Congress and in Missouri against the frequent assaults of the Radicals. Credited with being the principal leader in saving Missouri for the Union in 1861, Blair later served with great distinction at Vicksburg, Chattanooga, and in the Sherman campaigns throughout Georgia and the Carolinas. He is one of only two Missourians ever honored by his state in Statuary Hall in the U.S. Capitol. Frank Blair: Lincoln's Conservative reveals the full extent of Blair's importance as a national political figure. Specialists in nineteenth-century America, students of Missouri history, and Civil War buffs will welcome this study, which will long stand as the definitive work on this influential and colorful character.
Main Description
Known for his fearlessness in both the political arena and the battlefield, Frank Blair is a Missouri legend. As a member of one of the most prominent and powerful political families in America during the nineteenth century, possibly the equivalent of the twentieth-century Kennedys, Frank was steeped in politics at an early age. The youngest son of Francis Preston Blair, editor of Andrew Jackson'sWashington Globeand adviser to Presidents Andrew Jackson through Andrew Johnson, Frank Blair was greatly influenced by his father, who had high political expectations of him. Volatile and combative, Blair was either strongly admired or hated by the public figures of his day. He held adamantly to his opinions and fought hard for his political causes. He was an ardent supporter of Abraham Lincoln and championed the president's program in Congress and in Missouri against the frequent assaults of the Radicals. Credited with being the principal leader in saving Missouri for the Union in 1861, Blair later served with great distinction at Vicksburg, Chattanooga, and in the Sherman campaigns throughout Georgia and the Carolinas. He is one of only two Missourians ever honored by his state in Statuary Hall in the U.S. Capitol. Frank Blair: Lincoln's Conservativereveals the full extent of Blair's importance as a national political figure. Specialists in nineteenth-century America, students of Missouri history, and Civil War buffs will welcome this study, which will long stand as the definitive work on this influential and colorful character.

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