Catalogue


Soldier and scholar : Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve and the Civil War /
edited by Ward W. Briggs, Jr.
imprint
Charlottesville : University Press of Virginia, c1998.
description
x, 430 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0813917433 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Charlottesville : University Press of Virginia, c1998.
isbn
0813917433 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
1826652
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1998-07:
Classical scholar and first editor of the Journal of Philology, Gildersleeve was also a child of the South. His education at Princeton did not modify the intensity of his passion for the Confederacy. Perhaps his patriotism was inflamed by serious wounds received early in the war. More than half of these primary documents are editorials published in the Richmond Examiner from 1863 through August 1864. Gildersleeve's commitment to the Southern cause and the passions he expressed are hard to reconcile with his role as scholar: "But we have to deal with a race of butchers ... and we must mete out to them strict justice ..." (April 28, 1864) or, "Hang them, and let them remain hanging, as a sign of the 'Entertainment for Man and Beast' which we offer to the Yankee race" (a March 11, 1864, reference to raiding parties). Gildersleeve despised Lincoln and never tired of parodying him during the war as ape, emperor, or clown. Editor Briggs organized the documents in three parts, the first autobiographical, the third essays, an organization that makes the work less coherent for readers. The extreme views of the second part demonstrate Civil War passions, but readers would be well advised to read each component separately. Recommended for academic libraries with extensive Civil War collections. Upper-division undergraduates and above. N. J. Hervey; Luther College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 1998
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Summaries
Main Description
One of America's greatest classical scholars, Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve (1831-1924) was also a Civil War journalist. Born in Charleston, South Carolina, and a self-described "southerner beyond dispute," he received his doctorate in Germany and returned to America an enthusiastic advocate of Greek scholarship. Like every male member of his immediate family (including his father). Gildersleeve enlisted after Fort Sumter, but he continued to teach at the University of Virginia during the winters. Frequenting Richmond during the war, this young intellectual and passionate partisan who found the war, with its attendant social and political issues, as stimulating as his beloved classics. In Soldier and Scholar, editor Ward Briggs has assembled a revealing collection of Gildersleeve's writings: autobiographical essays, sixty-three editorials he wrote for the Richmond Examiner during the war, and a series of his reflections upon the causes and effects of the Civil War thirty years later. This collection, which offers a view of Gildersleeve's intellectual beliefs and his passions, should interest Southern historians, classicists, and Civil War buffs.
Unpaid Annotation
One of America's greatest classical scholars, Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve (1831-1924) was also a Civil War journalist. Born in Charleston, South Carolina, and a self-described "southerner beyond dispute", he received his doctorate in Germany and returned to America an enthusiastic advocate of Greek scholarship. Like every male member of his immediate family (including his father), Gildersleeve enlisted after Fort Sumter, but he continued to teach at the University of Virginia during the winters. Frequenting Richmond during the war, this young intellectual and passionate partisan who found the war, with its attendant social and political issues, as stimulating as his beloved classics. In Soldier and Scholar, editor Ward Briggs has assembled a revealing collection of Gildersleeve's writings: autobiographical essays, sixty-three editorials he wrote for the Richmond Examiner during the war, and a series of his reflections upon the causes and effects of the Civil War thirty years later. Unlike published Civil War,diaries, the editorials do not merely record daily occurrences and impressions; they analyze military, social, economic, and political events, setting them in a larger ethical and historical context. Infused with the rhetoric of Gildersleeve's classical training, these pieces are frequently vitriolic attacks not only on the evil and immoral Yankees, miscegenation, Jews, and critics of slavery, but also on Jefferson Davis, his hapless Confederate administration, and the struggling Southern armies.

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