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The Mamluks in Egyptian politics and society /
edited by Thomas Phillip, and Ulrich Haarmaan.
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 1998.
description
xiv, 306 p.
ISBN
0521591155 (hb)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 1998.
isbn
0521591155 (hb)
catalogue key
1816793
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Both Richards and Hearmann debate rather eloquently..." Leonor Fernandes, MESA Bulletin
"Raymond's article showcase sopisticated technical analysis of residential patterns in Cairo...The collection is a superb glance back at the traditional social analysis that has brought the field of Mamluk Studies to the forefront of Islamic history" Mamluk Studies Review
"Scholars of the Mamluk and Ottoman periods in Egypt will certainly want to become familiar with this volume, and specialists in other fields are likely to find papers of interest to them. For historians of the sultanate in particular, this volume will serve as a means to map the contours of a rapidly expanding field of study." International Hournal of Middle East Studies
"...this book will doubtlessly appeal to Mamluk specialists." Christopher S. Taylor, Journal of the American Oriental Society
"This volume offers a valuable assessment of current scholarship."Warren C. Schultz, Religious Studies Review
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Distinguished scholars provide an accessible introduction to the structure of power under the Mamluks (military slaves from the steppes of southern Russia and later from the Caucasus and the Balkans) and its economic foundations.
Description for Bookstore
For over half a millenium the Mamluks wielded power over Egypt. During this time they formed a remarkable political, military and economic elite, ruling as sovereigns from 1250 to 1517 and, after the Ottoman conquest, regaining much of their former paramountcy under Turkish supremacy. In this collection of essays, some of the most distinguished scholars in the field provide an accessible introduction to the structure of political power under the Mamluks and its economic foundations. The essays also offer a unique insight into the Mamluk househaolds and their relationship with the indigenous Egyptian population.
Description for Bookstore
For over half a millennium the Mamluks wielded power over Egypt. During this time they formed a remarkable political, military and economic elite, ruling as sovereigns from 1250 to 1517. Distinguished scholars provide an accessible introduction to the structure of political power under the Mamluks and its economic foundations.
Description for Bookstore
For over half a millennium the Mamluks wielded power over Egypt. During this time they formed a remarkable political, military and economic elite, ruling as sovereigns from 1250 to 1517. In this 2008 book, distinguished scholars provide an accessible introduction to the structure of political power under the Mamluks and its economic foundations.
Description for Library
For over half a millennium the Mamluks wielded power over Egypt. During this time they formed a remarkable political, military and economic elite, ruling as sovereigns from 1250 to 1517 and, after the Ottoman conquest, regaining much of their former paramountcy under Turkish supremacy. In this collection of essays, some of the most distinguished scholars in the field provide an accessible introduction to the structure of political power under the Mamluks and its economic foundations. The essays also offer a unique insight into the Mamluk households and their relationship with the indigenous Egyptian population.
Main Description
For more than half a millennium the Mamluks - military slaves emanating from the steppes of southern Russia and later from the Caucasus and the Balkans - wielded power over Egypt. During this time they formed a remarkable political, military and economic elite, ruling as sovereigns from 1250 to 1517 and, after the Ottoman conquest of Egypt, regaining much of their former paramountcy under Turkish supremacy. In this 2008 collection of essays, Ulrich Haarman and Thomas Philipp have brought together the research of some of the most distinguished scholars in the field to provide an accessible and coherent introduction to the structure of political power under the Mamluks and its economic foundations. The essays also offer a unique insight into the Mamluk households and their relationship with the indigenous Egyptian population.
Main Description
For more than half a millennium the Mamluks - military slaves emanating from the steppes of southern Russia and later from the Caucasus and the Balkans - wielded power over Egypt. During this time they formed a remarkable political, military and economic elite, ruling as sovereigns from 1250 to 1517 and, after the Ottoman conquest of Egypt, regaining much of their former paramountcy under Turkish supremacy. In this collection of essays, Ulrich Haarman and Thomas Philipp have brought together the research of some of the most distinguished scholars in the field to provide an accessible and coherent introduction to the structure of political power under the Mamluks and its economic foundations. The essays also offer a unique insight into the Mamluk households and their relationship with the indigenous Egyptian population.
Main Description
For over half a millennium the Mamluks wielded power over Egypt. During this time they formed a remarkable political, military and economic elite, ruling as sovereigns from 1250 to 1517 and, after the Ottoman conquest, regaining much of their former influence under Turkish supremacy. In this collection of essays, some of the most distinguished scholars in the field provide an accessible introduction to the structure of political power under the Mamluks and its economic foundations. The essays also offer a unique insight into the Mamluk households and their relationship with the indigenous Egyptian population.
Table of Contents
List of illustrations
Preface
Mamluk Rule and Succession
Literary offerings: a genre of courtly literature
Rank-and-file Mamluks versus amirs: new norms in the Mamluk military institution
Mamluk amirs and their families and households
Joseph's law: the careers and activities of Mamluk descendants before the Ottoman conquest of Egypt
Mamluk Households: Coherence and Disintegration
The re-emergence of the Mamluks following the Ottoman conquest
'Mamluk households' and 'Mamluk factions' in Ottoman Egypt: a reconsideration
Personal loyalty and political power of the Mamluks in the eighteenth century
The Mamluk beylicate of Egypt in the last decades
Mamluk Culture, Science and Education
Mamluk astronomy and the institution of the muwaqqit
The Mamluks as Muslims: the military elite and the construction of Islam in medieval
The late triumph of the Persian bow: critical voices on the Mamluk monopoloy of weaponry
Concepts of history as reflected in Arabic historiographical writing in Ottoman Syria and Egypt
Cultural life in Mamluk households
Mamluk Property, Geography and Urban Society
The residential districts of Cairo's elite in the Mamluk and Ottoman periods
Patterns of urban patronage in Cairo: a comparison between the Mamluk and the Ottoman periods
Notes on the early nazar al-khass
Coptic festivals of the Nile: aberrations of the past?
Marriage in late eighteenth-century Egypt
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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