Catalogue


The house is made of poetry : the art of Ruth Stone /
edited by Wendy Barker and Sandra M. Gilbert.
imprint
Carbondale : Southern Illinois University Press, c1996.
description
xiii, 214 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0809320126 (acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Carbondale : Southern Illinois University Press, c1996.
isbn
0809320126 (acid-free paper)
catalogue key
1814219
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
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This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, June 1996
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Summaries
Main Description
Ruth Stone has always eschewed self-promotion and, in the words of Leslie Fiedler, "has never been a member of any school or clique or gaggle of mutual admirers." But her poems speak so vibrantly for her that she cannot be ignored. In her preface to this volume, Sandra M. Gilbert declares that Stone's "intense attention to the ordinary transforms it into (or reveals it as) the extraordinary. Her passionate verses evoke impassioned responses." At the same time, Gilbert continues, the essays collected here "consistently testify to Stone's radical unworldliness, in particular her insouciant contempt for the 'floor walkers and straw bosses' who sometimes seem to control the poetry 'factory' both inside and outside the university." Wendy Barker and Sandra Gilbert have organized the book into three sections: "Knowing Ruth Stone," "A Life of Art," and "Reading Ruth Stone." In "Knowing Ruth Stone," writers of different generations who have known the poet over the years provide memoirs. Noting Stone's singularity, Fiedler points out that "she resists all labels" and is "one of the few contemporaries whom it is possible to think of simply as a 'poet.'" Sharon Olds defines her vitality ("A Ruth Stone poem feels alive in the hands"), and Jan Freeman praises her aesthetic intensity ("Everything in the life of Ruth Stone is integrated with poetry"). "A Life of Art" sketches the outlines of Stone's career and traces her evolution as a poet. Barker and Norman Friedman, for example, trace her development from the "high spirits and elegant craft" of her first volumeInan Iridescent Timethrough the "deepening shadows," "poignant wit," and "bittersweet meditations" of her later work. In interviews separated by decades (one in the 1970s and one in the 1990s), Sandra Gilbert and Robert Bradley discuss with Stone her own sense of her aesthetic origins and literary growth. "Reading Ruth Stone" is an examination of Stone's key themes and modes. Diane Wakoski and Diana O'Hehir focus on the tragicomic vision that colors much of her work; Kevin Clark and Elyse Blankley explore the political aspects of her poetry; Roger Gilbert analyzes her "often uncannily astute insights into the 'otherness' of other lives"; Janet Lowery and Kandace Brill Lombart draw on the biographical background of Stone's "grief work"; and Sandra Gilbert studies hercaritas,her empathic love that redeems pain.
Main Description
Ruth Stone has always eschewed self-promotion and, in the words of Leslie Fiedler, "has never been a member of any school or clique or gaggle of mutual admirers." But her poems speak so vibrantly for her that she cannot be ignored. In her preface to this volume, Sandra M. Gilbert declares that Stone's "intense attention to the ordinary transforms it into (or reveals it as) the extraordinary. Her passionate verses evoke impassioned responses." At the same time, Gilbert continues, the essays collected here "consistently testify to Stone's radical unworldliness, in particular her insouciant contempt for the ‘floor walkers and straw bosses' who sometimes seem to control the poetry ‘factory' both inside and outside the university." Wendy Barker and Sandra Gilbert have organized the book into three sections: "Knowing Ruth Stone," "A Life of Art," and "Reading Ruth Stone." In "Knowing Ruth Stone," writers of different generations who have known the poet over the years provide memoirs. Noting Stone's singularity, Fiedler points out that "she resists all labels" and is "one of the few contemporaries whom it is possible to think of simply as a ‘poet.'" Sharon Olds defines her vitality ("A Ruth Stone poem feels alive in the hands"), and Jan Freeman praises her aesthetic intensity ("Everything in the life of Ruth Stone is integrated with poetry"). "A Life of Art" sketches the outlines of Stone's career and traces her evolution as a poet. Barker and Norman Friedman, for example, trace her development from the "high spirits and elegant craft" of her first volume-- In an Iridescent Time-- through the "deepening shadows," "poignant wit," and "bittersweet meditations" of her later work. In interviews separated by decades (one in the 1970s and one in the 1990s), Sandra Gilbert and Robert Bradley discuss with Stone her own sense of her aesthetic origins and literary growth. "Reading Ruth Stone" is an examination of Stone's key themes and modes. Diane Wakoski and Diana O'Hehir focus on the tragicomic vision that colors much of her work; Kevin Clark and Elyse Blankley explore the political aspects of her poetry; Roger Gilbert analyzes her "often uncannily astute insights into the ‘otherness' of other lives"; Janet Lowery and Kandace Brill Lombart draw on the biographical background of Stone's "grief work"; and Sandra Gilbert studies her caritas, her empathic love that redeems pain.
Main Description
Ruth Stone has always eschewed self-promotion and, in the words of Leslie Fiedler, "has never been a member of any school or clique or gaggle of mutual admirers." But her poems speak so vibrantly for her that she cannot be ignored.In her preface to this volume, Sandra M. Gilbert declares that Stone's "intense attention to the ordinary transforms it into (or reveals it as) the extraordinary. Her passionate verses evoke impassioned responses." At the same time, Gilbert continues, the essays collected here "consistently testify to Stone's radical unworldliness, in particular her insouciant contempt for the ‘floor walkers and straw bosses' who sometimes seem to control the poetry ‘factory' both inside and outside the university."Wendy Barker and Sandra Gilbert have organized the book into three sections: "Knowing Ruth Stone," "A Life of Art," and "Reading Ruth Stone." In "Knowing Ruth Stone," writers of different generations who have known the poet over the years provide memoirs. Noting Stone's singularity, Fiedler points out that "she resists all labels" and is "one of the few contemporaries whom it is possible to think of simply as a ‘poet.'" Sharon Olds defines her vitality ("A Ruth Stone poem feels alive in the hands"), and Jan Freeman praises her aesthetic intensity ("Everything in the life of Ruth Stone is integrated with poetry")."A Life of Art" sketches the outlines of Stone's career and traces her evolution as a poet. Barker and Norman Friedman, for example, trace her development from the "high spirits and elegant craft" of her first volume--Inan Iridescent Time--through the "deepening shadows," "poignant wit," and "bittersweet meditations" of her later work. In interviews separated by decades (one in the 1970s and one in the 1990s), Sandra Gilbert and Robert Bradley discuss with Stone her own sense of her aesthetic origins and literary growth."Reading Ruth Stone" is an examination of Stone's key themes and modes. Diane Wakoski and Diana O'Hehir focus on the tragicomic vision that colors much of her work; Kevin Clark and Elyse Blankley explore the political aspects of her poetry; Roger Gilbert analyzes her "often uncannily astute insights into the ‘otherness' of other lives"; Janet Lowery and Kandace Brill Lombart draw on the biographical background of Stone's "grief work"; and Sandra Gilbert studies hercaritas,her empathic love that redeems pain.
Table of Contents
Ad Feminam: Women and Literaturep. vii
Preface: Outside the Poetry Factoryp. ix
Abbreviations of Collections of Poetry by Ruth Stonep. xv
Knowing Ruth Stonep. 1
On Ruth Stonep. 3
Ruth Stone and Her Poemsp. 5
Poetry and Life, Poetry and Ruthp. 9
Like a Laser Beamp. 17
A Life of Artp. 31
Mapping Ruth Stone's Life and Art Wendy Barkerp. 33
The Poetry of Ruth Stonep. 46
An Interview with Ruth Stone: 1973p. 52
An Interview with Ruth Stone: 1990 Robert Bradleyp. 67
Poet in the Mountainsp. 78
Reading Ruth Stonep. 99
The Comedic Art of Ruth Stonep. 101
Ruth Stone's Magic Mixture Diana O'Hehirp. 106
"The Wife's Went Bazook" Comedic Feminism in the Poetry of Ruth Stonep. 112
Violence and War, Ethics and Erotics: Ruth Stone's "Miraculous Translations"p. 127
Experiencing Otherness Ruth Stone's Art of Inference Roger Gilbertp. 140
The Clever Widow: Grief-Work, Humor, and Narrative in Ruth Stone's Poetry Janet Loweryp. 151
"Who Is the Widow's Muse?": A Memoir and Reading of Ruth Stonep. 163
"Under the Seal of My Widowhood" Kandace Brill Lombartp. 180
Definitions of Love: Ruth Stone's Feminist Caritasp. 202
Contributorsp. 207
Indexp. 211
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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