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China's transition /
Andrew J. Nathan ; with contributions by Tianjian Shi and Helena V.S. Ho.
imprint
New York : Columbia University Press, 1997.
description
xiv, 313 p. : ill.
ISBN
0231110227 (cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Columbia University Press, 1997.
isbn
0231110227 (cloth)
catalogue key
1806285
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Andrew J. Nathan is professor of politics at Columbia University
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1998-06:
This collection of articles and reviews previously published by well-known China scholar Andrew Nathan presents a hodgepodge of topics. Included is an analysis of an election in Taiwan six years ago. The results of the 1996 elections render this article a quaint historical document. The book reviews and review articles force the reader to refer to footnotes at the back to discover what books are being reviewed. Other items deal with Maoist China, Chinese culture, human rights, Hong Kong, and the prospects for constitutionalism in China. Some are rigorously academic, suitable for advanced students and faculty only, while others are general interest items from The New Republic. The latter are generally outdated. These materials can be accessed easily by any automated library search engines. Why Nathan or Columbia University Press felt these items were worth combining into a book baffles this reviewer. H. Nelsen; University of South Florida
Appeared in Library Journal on 1998-01-01:
In this collection of 16 essays, Nathan (East Asian Inst., Columbia Univ.) provides several different approaches to analyzing present-day Chinese politics and political culture. Written for an academic audience, the essays contain abstract concepts such as "cultural relativism," "conservative modernization," and "hermeneutic versus positivistic approaches to distinctiveness"; provide detailed data on, for example, Taiwan's legislature and political party system; and present the results of (groundbreaking) survey research on political efficacy in China. This is in sharp contrast to Andrew J. Nathan and Robert S. Ross's The Great Wall and the Empty Fortress (LJ 7/97), in which the authors addressed the broader spectrum of informed readers. On the other hand, Nathan's main points should interest informed readers as well as academics‘that absolute power allowed Mao to be corrupt; that nothing inherent in Chinese culture renders it incapable of evolving into a democracy; and that the United States should not apologize for addressing human rights issues in China and should respond appropriately to abuses.‘Peggy Spitzer Christoff, Oak Park, Ill. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
[A] deeply perceptive and eloquent collection of essays.... What distinguishes Nathan's approach is that he takes up the political question of how to negotiate with Beijing about human rights.
"[A] deeply perceptive and eloquent collection of essays.... What distinguishes Nathan's approach is that he takes up the political question of how to negotiate with Beijing about human rights." -- New York Review of Books
"A remarkable contribution to scholarship on China by a very distinguished China-watcher whose analyses of Chinese politics have stood the test of time." -- American Asian Review
Glitters with refreshing analyses on a wide range of literary, political, and ideological issues in recent PRC history... Packed with great insights and excellent analyses, it should be considered indispensable reading for any serious student of contemporary Chinese politics.
"Glitters with refreshing analyses on a wide range of literary, political, and ideological issues in recent PRC history... Packed with great insights and excellent analyses, it should be considered indispensable reading for any serious student of contemporary Chinese politics." -- Journal of Oriental Studies
Reading this excellent work by Andrew Nathan on the potential for a Chinese transition to democracy compels one to probe one's own unexamined presuppositions and unconscious cultural prejudices.
"Reading this excellent work by Andrew Nathan on the potential for a Chinese transition to democracy compels one to probe one's own unexamined presuppositions and unconscious cultural prejudices." -- Edward Friedman, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Philosophy East & West
Such rich, thoughtful, and rigorous analysis makes China's Transition an important book in the study of contemporary Chinese politics. It represents a remarkable methodological achievement that should be the envy of all students of Chinese politics.
"Such rich, thoughtful, and rigorous analysis makes China's Transitionan important book in the study of contemporary Chinese politics. It represents a remarkable methodological achievement that should be the envy of all students of Chinese politics." -- Minxin Pei, Princeton University, Political Science Quarterly
"Such rich, thoughtful, and rigorous analysis makes China's Transition an important book in the study of contemporary Chinese politics. It represents a remarkable methodological achievement that should be the envy of all students of Chinese politics." -- Minxin Pei, Princeton University, Political Science Quarterly
Nathan has provided us with a fascinating lens through which to view China's evolving political future.
"Nathan has provided us with a fascinating lens through which to view China's evolving political future." -- Orville Schell, University of California, Berkeley
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, January 1998
Choice, June 1998
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
-- American Asian Review
Main Description
With more than one billion people, China represents both an ocean of economic opportunity and a frustrating backwater of continuing brutal political repression. What are the prospects for democratic evolution in a nation with one of the world's poorest human rights records? How have other nations responded to China since the recent, dramatic opening of its economic system-and how should they respond in the future? These are some of the most important questions confronting both the United States and the international community. On democracy, human rights, and the move to integrate China into the international economy; on Mao Zedong's regime and the reform since his death; and on the Taiwan experiment and Hong Kong's reintegration with China, Nathan offers an accessible introduction to the intricate web of contemporary Chinese politics and China's changing place in the global system.
Main Description
With more than one billion people, China represents both an ocean of economic opportunity and a frustrating backwater of continuing brutal political repression. What are the prospects for democratic evolution in a nation with one of the world's poorest human rights records? How have other nations responded to China since the recent, dramatic opening of its economic system-and how should they respond in the future? These are some of the most important questions confronting both the United States and the international community.On democracy, human rights, and the move to integrate China into the international economy; on Mao Zedong's regime and the reform since his death; and on the Taiwan experiment and Hong Kong's reintegration with China, Nathan offers an accessible introduction to the intricate web of contemporary Chinese politics and China's changing place in the global system.
Table of Contents
Tables and Figuresp. XIII
China Bites Backp. 1
A History of Crueltyp. 15
Mao and His Courtp. 26
Maoist Institutions and Post-Mao Reformp. 49
Chinese Democracy: The Lessons of Failurep. 63
The Democratic Visionp. 77
The Decision for Reform in Taiwanp. 90
Electing Taiwan's Legislaturep. 112
The Struggle for Hong Kong's Futurep. 127
Is Chinese Culture Distinctive?p. 136
Cultural Requisites for Democracy in Chinap. 152
Left and Right in Deng's Chinap. 174
The Place of Values in Cross-Cultural Studiesp. 198
The Chinese Volcanop. 217
The Constitutionalist Optionp. 231
Human Rights and American China Policyp. 246
Notesp. 263
Indexp. 295
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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