Catalogue

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Literary patronage in England, 1650-1800 /
Dustin Griffin.
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1996.
description
x, 317 p. : ill.
ISBN
0521560853 (hc)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1996.
isbn
0521560853 (hc)
catalogue key
1800232
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...clearly written, substantive, and well-argued...." "...Griffin's important book...will inevitably testify to the considerable strength of the case it makes." Robert C. Evans, Albion
"Dustin Griffin's admirable and exemplary study conveys good news to the scholarly community....it opens a discussion of the real influences on the patronage system on eighteenth-century letters and invites further analysis. Such an analysis of how the system affected the myriad minor and women authors remains to be considered, but Griffin has provided the necessary framework and set an exemplary critical standard." Betty Rizzo, Eighteenth-Century Fiction
"Dustin Griffin's necessary and welcome book on literary patronage in England's aggrandized eighteenth century is now the most thoughtful and important account of its subject." Robert Folkenflik, Bibliographical Society of America
"Dutin Griffin's Literary Patronage in England thoroughly examines patronage practices throughout the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries and concludes with a chapter tracing the continuance of patronage into the careers of Crabbe and Burns." John Kandl, The Wordsworth Circle
"Explores boldly and intelligently the complex relationships among various forms of monetary reward and symbolic capital....Rigorously argued and well-researched, this study offers a compelling rereading of the culture of late-seventeenth and eighteenth-century patronage." Studies in English Literature
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Griffin lays out the workings of the patronage system, arguing that it persisted throughout the 18th century and that authors wrote within that system, manipulating it to their advantage or resisting the claims of patrons by advancing counter-claims.
Description for Bookstore
Dustin Griffin offers the first comprehensive study of the system of literary patronage in early modern England. Combining the perspectives of literary, social and political history, he lays out the workings of the system and shows how authors resisted the claims of patrons by advancing counterclaims of their own.
Description for Library
Before the development of a full-blown literary 'market' in which an author might hope to make an independent living, books were brought to readers with considerable assistance from patronage. Dustin Griffin offers the first comprehensive study of the system of literary patronage in early modern England. Combining the perspectives of literary, social and political history, he lays out the workings of the system and shows how authors either wrote within it, manipulating it to their advantage or resisted the claims of patrons by advancing counterclaims of their own.
Main Description
Before the development of a full-blown literary "market" in which an author might hope to make an independent living, books were brought to readers with considerable assistance from patronage. Dustin Griffin offers the first comprehensive study of the system of literary patronage in early modern England. Combining the perspectives of literary, social, and political history, he lays out the workings of the system and shows how authors wrote within it, manipulating it to their advantage or resisting the claims of patrons by advancing counterclaims of their own.
Main Description
This is the first comprehensive study of the system of literary patronage in early modern England and it demonstrates that far from declining by 1750 - as many commentators have suggested - the system persisted, albeit in altered forms, throughout the eighteenth century. Combining the perspectives of literary, social and political history, Dustin Griffin lays out the workings of the patronage system and shows how authors wrote within that system, manipulating it to their advantage or resisting the claims of patrons by advancing counterclaims of their own. Professor Griffin describes the cultural economics of patronage and argues that literary patronage was in effect always 'political'. Chapters on individual authors, including Dryden, Swift, Pope and Johnson, as well as Edward Young, Richard Savage, Mary Leapor and Charlotte Lennox, address the author's role in the system, the rhetoric of dedications and the larger poetics of patronage.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Introduction
The cultural economics of literary patronage
The politics of patronage
John Dryden
Jonathan Swift
Alexander Pope
Edward Young and Richard Savage
Mary Leapor and Charlotte Lennox
Samuel Johnson
The persistence of patronage
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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