Catalogue


Founding the Republic : a documentary history /
edited by John J. Patrick.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 1995.
description
xxiii, 272 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0313292264 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 1995.
isbn
0313292264 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
1795342
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...the thoughtful readable essays which put the documents and issues in perspective make this a worthwhile addition to U.S. history reference collection. Recommended for all high school and public libraries."- VOYA
'œ...the thoughtful readable essays which put the documents and issues in perspective make this a worthwhile addition to U.S. history reference collection. Recommended for all high school and public libraries.'' VOYA
'œPatrick...offers an excellent resource for high schools with limited access to primary materials. His book contains selected documents, complete or in excerpt, from the debate surrounding America's founding in the years 1775-1792...a teacher who wants students to understand today's rights debates by looking at their roots could use selected documents for any class... Highly recommended.'' The Book Report
"Patrick...offers an excellent resource for high schools with limited access to primary materials. His book contains selected documents, complete or in excerpt, from the debate surrounding America's founding in the years 1775-1792...a teacher who wants students to understand today's rights debates by looking at their roots could use selected documents for any class... Highly recommended."- The Book Report
'œ...perfect one volume text that not only provides both the famous and not-so-famous writings, but includes introductory paragraphs that put each work in perspective to the shaping of the laws of the country.....This text is perfect for anyone studying American History, particularly high school and college students. Living historians will find it beneficial in the coverage of documents that, while of little importance today, were of great importance during a time period that we reenact. For anyone interested in seeing how the constitutions of Massachusetts, Virginia, and other commonwealths parelell the United States Cocstitution while predating it, this book is a must...should be on the shelves of most Rev. War reenactors, as well as public libraries.'' Smoke and Fire News
"...perfect one volume text that not only provides both the famous and not-so-famous writings, but includes introductory paragraphs that put each work in perspective to the shaping of the laws of the country.....This text is perfect for anyone studying American History, particularly high school and college students. Living historians will find it beneficial in the coverage of documents that, while of little importance today, were of great importance during a time period that we reenact. For anyone interested in seeing how the constitutions of Massachusetts, Virginia, and other commonwealths parelell the United States Cocstitution while predating it, this book is a must...should be on the shelves of most Rev. War reenactors, as well as public libraries."- Smoke and Fire News
This item was reviewed in:
Voice of Youth Advocates, April 1996
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
An important library and classroom tool for research and student debate on the core political ideas and issues of the founding period.
Long Description
This important library and classroom tool will make it easy for students to research and debate the core political ideas and issues of the founding period. The profound arguments regarding republicanism, federalism, constitutionalism, and individual rights come to life here, contextualized with introductory explanations to stimulate analysis and appraisal of the positions. Unique to this collection are documents relating to the establishment of constitutional governments in the original 13 states, debate over the Bill of Rights, and documents reflecting a variety of alternative voices, including letters and petitions from women and African-American and Native-American leaders. This presents a broader picture of the issues that confronted those who framed our government than has ever before been available. An advisory board of distinguished historians and teachers assisted Patrick with the selection of documents. This collection shows how the founding fathers arrived at consensus from the many conflicting viewpoints that characterized the debate on founding our extraordinary constitutional republic. The political debates on independence and original state constitutions are connected systematically to the subsequent debates on the ratification of the Federal Constitution and the Bill of Rights. Political grievances of dispossessed groups such as women, African Americans, and Native Americans, are connected to core ideas of the founding documents, such as the Declaration of Independence. Letters, petitions, sermons, court proceedings, Thomas Jefferson's notes, a selection of Federalist and anti-Federalist papers, even the Northwest Ordinance, are among the documents included. The work is organized topically into seven parts, each which is prefaced by an introductory essay which presents the main theme, ideas, and issues, and establishes a context for the documents that follow. Each document is preceded by an explanatory headnote, which includes questions to guide the reader's analysis and appraisal of the primary source. Each part ends with a select bibliography. A chronology of major events concludes the work. This collection is a basic research and debate tool that will be invaluable to school and public libraries and secondary school classrooms.
Table of Contents
Series Forewordp. xi
Introductionp. xiii
Chronology of Key Events in the Founding of the United States of Americap. xix
The Decision for Independence: Reasons for and against Separation from Britain, 1775-1776p. 1
Notesp. 5
Declaration of the Causes and Necessity of Taking Up Arms (Kuly 6, 1775)p. 7
Proclamation by the King for Suppressing Rebellion and Sedition (August 23, 1775)p. 12
Common Sense (Thomas Paine, January 10, 1776)p. 14
The True Interest of America Impartially Stated (published Anonymously by the Reverend Charles Inglis, March 1776)p. 19
Resolution for Independence (June 7, 1776)p. 24
Notes on the Debate in Congress on Independence (Thomas Jefferson, June 7-july 4, 1776)p. 25
The Declaration of Independence (July 4, 1776)p. 29
Making Constitutions for the New American States: Debates on Models of Good Government, 1776-1780p. 35
The People the Best Governors: or a Plan of Government Founded on the Just Principles of Natural Freedom (published Anonymously in New Hampshire, 1776)p. 41
Thoughts on Government: Applicable to the Present State of the American Colonies (in a Letter from a Gentleman [John Adams] to His Friend, April 1776)p. 45
The Virginia Declaration of Rights (June 12, 1776)p. 52
Preamble to the Pennsylvania Constitution (August 1776)p. 56
Pennsylvania Declaration of Rights (August 1776)p. 58
The Essex Result (Theophilus Parsons, Newburyport, Massachusetts, 1778)p. 61
Preamble to the Massachusetts Constitution (1780)p. 65
The Massachusetts Declaration of Rights (1780)p. 67
Problems of Equality and Liberty in the New American States, 1776-1792p. 73
Letter to John Adams (Abigail Adams, March 31, 1776)p. 79
Letter to James Sullivan (John Adams, May 26, 1776)p. 81
Petition against Slavery to the General Court of Massachusetts (January 13, 1777)p. 85
Quock Walker's Case (1783)p. 87
Memorial and Remonstrance against Religious Assessments (James Madison, June 20, 1785)p. 89
The Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom (Thomas Jefferson, January 16, 1786)p. 94
Letter from Three Seneca Leaders to President George Washington (1790)p. 97
A Sermon against Slavery (The Reverend James Dana, September 9, 1791)p. 99
Letter to Thomas Jefferson (Benjamin Banneker, August 19, 1791)p. 102
Letters to Benjamin Banneker and to the Marquis de Condorcet (Thomas Jefferson, August 30, 1791)p. 106
The Crisis of Government under the Articles of Confederation, 1781-1787p. 109
The Articles of Confederation (1781)p. 115
Circular Letter to the State Governors (George Washington, June 8, 1783)p. 125
Letter to Samuel Adams (Richard Henry Lee, March 14, 1785)p. 127
Letter to George Washington (John Jay, June 27, 1786)p. 129
Letter to John Jay (George Washington, August 1, 1786)p. 131
Proceedings of the State Commissioners at Annapolis, Maryland (september 11-14, 1786)p. 133
Letter to Edward Carrington (Thomas Jefferson, January 16, 1787)p. 136
Letter to James Madison (Thomas Jefferson, January 30, 1787)p. 138
Northwest Ordinance (July 13, 1787)p. 140
Further Readingp. 146
The Federal Convention and the Constitution, 1787p. 147
Letter to George Washington (James Madison, April 16, 1787)p. 155
Virginia Plan (reported by James Madison, May 29, 1787)p. 159
Debate on the Virginia Plan (June 6, 1787)p. 163
Report of the Committee of the Whole (June 13, 1787)p. 167
New Jersey Plan (June 15, 1787)p. 170
Debate on the New Jersey and Virginia Plans (June 16, 1787)p. 173
Debate on Slavery (August 21-22, 1787)p. 177
Signing the Constitution and Concluding the Convention (september 17, 1787)p. 181
The Constitution of the United States of America, Signed by Thirty-Nine Delegates to the Federal Convention (september 17, 1787)p. 184
Debate on the Constitution: Federalists versus Anti-Federalists, 1787-1788p. 197
Essay I (Brutus, October 18, 1787)p. 203
The Federalist 1 (publius [Alexander Hamilton], October 27, 1787)p. 207
Letter to the General Court of Massachusetts (Elbridge Gerry, November 3, 1787)p. 210
Objections to the Constitution (George Mason, November 22, 1787)p. 213
The Federalist 10 (Publius [James Madison], November 22, 1787)p. 216
Letter IV (Agrippa [James Winthrop], December 4, 1787)p. 222
The Federalist 39 (Publius [James Madison], January 16, 1788)p. 225
The Federalist 51 (Publius [James Madison], February 6, 1788)p. 229
Essay XV (Brutus, March 20, 1788)p. 233
The Federalist 78 (Publius [Alexander Hamilton], May 28, 1788)p. 237
Further Readingp. 241
The First Federal Congress and the Bill of Rights, 1788-1792p. 243
Letter to James Madison (Thomas Jefferson, December 20, 1787)p. 249
Amendments to the U.S. Constitution Proposed by the Massachusetts Ratifying Convention (February 6, 1788)p. 251
Amendments to the U.S. Constitution Proposed by the New York Ratifying Convention (July 26, 1788)p. 253
Letter to Thomas Jefferson (James Madison, October 17, 1788)p. 255
Speech in the U.S. House of Representatives (James Madison, June 8, 1789)p. 258
Amendments Passed by the U.S. Congress (september 25, 1789)p. 262
The Bill of Rights, Amendments I-X to the U.S. Constitution (Ratified December 15, 1791 and Certified by Thomas Jefferson, Secretary of State, in a Letter to the State Governors, March 1, 1792)p. 265
Indexp. 269
About the Editorp. 273
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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