Catalogue


Religious convictions and political choice /
Kent Greenawalt.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1988.
description
xii, 266 p.
ISBN
0195049136 (alk. paper) :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1988.
isbn
0195049136 (alk. paper) :
catalogue key
1772702
 
Includes bibliographies and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Kent Greenawalt, University Professor at Columbia University, has been Cardozo Professor of Jurisprudence at Columbia University Law School
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1988-04:
With this book, Greenawalt shows himself to be very much a participant in current American church-state discussions. Some such as John Rawls and Bruce Ackerman have argued that both citizens and elected officials in a democracy such as the US should not use religious principles to arrive at political secular judgments precisely because the two areas are so different. Greenawalt's argument is a double one: first, he agrees that political decisions should not be made on the basis of someone's determination that they are ``sinful.'' Second, he argues that using religious convictions as a basis for decision in matters where purely secular ideas and morals offer no particular or conclusive insight is something not only allowable but necessary for the health of the democratic process. Many political decisions, he feels, because of their personal implications, cannot be based on empirical determination alone. They need the added insight of value judgments, which thus make a positive contribution to the process. He also examines a number of the legal, constitutional questions involved in all of this. This sensible position is repeated and developed at such length and with such nuance, however, as to make the reading a bit heavy going for undergraduates. Recommended for graduate libraries especially.-R.W. Rousseau, University of Scranton
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A sane book for an election year, and for decades to come."--The Christian Century
"A sane book for an election year, and for decades to come."--TheChristian Century
"A searching, well argued, and richly suggestive treatment of the ethics of citizenship in a liberal democracy....The book contains much that is of value in basic social-political philosophy. It is also lucid, forthright, and concretely written. Given the quality of its argumentation and theimportance of the issue, it is essential reading for anyone seriously interested in the appropriate relation between religion and politics."--Ethics
"A searching, well argued, and richly suggestive treatment of the ethicsof citizenship in a liberal democracy....The book contains much that is of valuein basic social-political philosophy. It is also lucid, forthright, andconcretely written. Given the quality of its argumentation and the importanceof the issue, it is essential reading for anyone seriously interested in theappropriate relation between religion and politics."--Ethics
"A searching, well argued, and richly suggestive treatment of the ethics of citizenship in a liberal democracy....The book contains much that is of value in basic social-political philosophy. It is also lucid, forthright, and concretely written. Given the quality of its argumentation and the importance of the issue, it is essential reading for anyone seriously interested in the appropriate relation between religion and politics."--Ethics "Lucid and important...Greenawalt has a fine way of clarifying issues and staying strictly within the limits he has set himself....The argument of the book is impressive and important for theologians and others concerned for an effective theological contribution to public debate."--Journal of Theological Studies "Deserves its rightful place alongside the works of Rawls and Dworkin."--Northern Illinois University Law Review "A sane book for an election year, and for decades to come."--The Christian Century
"A searching, well argued, and richly suggestive treatment of the ethics of citizenship in a liberal democracy....The book contains much that is of value in basic social-political philosophy. It is also lucid, forthright, and concretely written. Given the quality of its argumentation and the importance of the issue, it is essential reading for anyone seriously interested in the appropriate relation between religion and politics."-- Ethics "Lucid and important...Greenawalt has a fine way of clarifying issues and staying strictly within the limits he has set himself....The argument of the book is impressive and important for theologians and others concerned for an effective theological contribution to public debate."-- Journal of Theological Studies "Deserves its rightful place alongside the works of Rawls and Dworkin."-- Northern Illinois University Law Review "A sane book for an election year, and for decades to come."-- The Christian Century
"A searching, well argued, and richly suggestive treatment of the ethics of citizenship in a liberal democracy....The book contains much that is of value in basic social-political philosophy. It is also lucid, forthright, and concretely written. Given the quality of its argumentation and the importance of the issue, it is essential reading for anyone seriously interested in the appropriate relation between religion and politics."--Ethics "Lucid and important...Greenawalt has a fine way of clarifying issues and staying strictly within the limits he has set himself....The argument of the book is impressive and important for theologians and others concerned for an effective theological contribution to public debate."--Journal ofTheological Studies "Deserves its rightful place alongside the works of Rawls and Dworkin."--Northern Illinois University Law Review "A sane book for an election year, and for decades to come."--The Christian Century
"Deserves its rightful place alongside the works of Rawls and Dworkin."--Northern Illinois University Law Review
"Deserves its rightful place alongside the works of Rawls andDworkin."--Northern Illinois University Law Review
"Lucid and important...Greenawalt has a fine way of clarifying issues and staying strictly within the limits he has set himself....The argument of the book is impressive and important for theologians and others concerned for an effective theological contribution to public debate."--Journal ofTheological Studies
"Lucid and important...Greenawalt has a fine way of clarifying issues andstaying strictly within the limits he has set himself....The argument of thebook is impressive and important for theologians and others concerned for aneffective theological contribution to public debate."--Journal of TheologicalStudies
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 1988
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
How far may Americans properly rely on their religious beliefs when they make and defend political decisions? For example, are ordinary citizens or legislators doing something wrong when they consciously allow their decisions respecting abortion laws to be determined by their religious views? Despite its intense contemporary relevance, the full dimensions of this issue have until now not been thoroughly examined. Religious Convictions and Political Choice represents thefirst attempt to fill this gap. Beginning with an account of the basic premises of our liberal democracy, Greenawalt moves to a comparison between rational secular grounds of decision and grounds based on religious convictions. He discusses particular issues such as animal rights and abortion, showing howreligious convictions can bear on an individual's decisions about them, and inquires whether reliance on such convictions is compatible with liberal democratic premises. In conclusion, he argues that citizens cannot be expected to rely exclusively on rational, secular grounds.
Long Description
This is the first thorough examination of what has become an intensely relevant contemporary issue. Beginning with an account of the basic premises of liberal democracy, it moves on to a comparison between rational, secular grounds of decision and grounds based on religious convictions. The author discusses particular issues such as animal rights and abortion, showing how religious convictions can bear on an individual's decisions about them, and enquires whether reliance on such convictions is compatible with liberal democratic premises. He disputes the claim that human beings can be expected to rely exclusively on rational, secular grounds, given their limited capacities.
Main Description
How far may Americans properly rely on their religious beliefs when they make and defend political decisions? For example, are ordinary citizens or legislators doing something wrong when they consciously allow their decisions respecting abortion laws to be determined by their religious views? Despite its intense contemporary relevance, the full dimensions of this issue have until now not been thoroughly examined. Religious Convictions and Political Choice represents the first attempt to fill this gap. Beginning with an account of the basic premises of our liberal democracy, Greenawaltmoves to a comparison between rational secular grounds of decision and grounds based on religious convictions. He discusses particular issues such as animal rights and abortion, showing how religious convictions can bear on an individual's decisions about them, and inquires whether reliance on suchconvictions is compatible with liberal democratic premises. In conclusion, he argues that citizens cannot be expected to rely exclusively on rational, secular grounds.
Main Description
How far may Americans properly rely on their religious beliefs when they make and defend political decisions? For example, are ordinary citizens or legislators doing something wrong when they consciously allow their decisions respecting abortion laws to be determined by their religious views? Despite its intense contemporary relevance, the full dimensions of this issue have until now not been thoroughly examined. Religious Convictions and Political Choice represents the first attempt to fill this gap. Beginning with an account of the basic premises of our liberal democracy, Greenawalt moves to a comparison between rational secular grounds of decision and grounds based on religious convictions. He discusses particular issues such as animal rights and abortion, showing how religious convictions can bear on an individual's decisions about them, and inquires whether reliance on such convictions is compatible with liberal democratic premises. In conclusion, he argues that citizens cannot be expected to rely exclusively on rational, secular grounds.
Unpaid Annotation
In Religious Convictions and Political Choice, Kent Greenawalt challenges the theories of such political thinkers as John Rawls and Bruce Ackerman, who argue that citizens and officials in a liberal democracy should eschew religiously based premises in developing political judgments and limit themselves to secular conceptions of justice and publicly accessible methods of determining facts. Beginning with an account of the basic premises of our political system, Religious Convictions and Political Choice examines the full dimensions of this issue of intense contemporary relevance, and compels a fundamental reexamination of the place of religion in the political life of a liberal democracy.
Table of Contents
Liberal Democracy and Publicly Accessible Reasons
The Aim and Scope of the Inquiryp. 3
Premises of Liberal Democracy and the Place of Religionp. 14
The Relevance of Religious Convictions for Political Choicep. 30
Publicly Accessible Grounds of Decision and Religious Convictionsp. 49
Political Choices and Religious Convictions
Inappropriate Grounds of Restriction: Consenting Sexual Acts as Sinsp. 87
Borderlines of Status I: Animal Rights and Environmental Policyp. 98
Borderlines of Status II: Abortionp. 120
Borderlines of Status III: Religious Convictions and the Limits of Publicly Accessible Reasonsp. 144
Moral Standards, Evaluative Comparisons, and Facts: Welfare Assistance and Other Issuesp. 173
Church-State Problemsp. 196
Religious Bases That Conflict with Common Forms of Reasoningp. 203
Dialogue, Official Action, and Constitutionality
Appropriate Political Discourse in a Liberal Societyp. 215
Religious Convictions and Official Actionp. 231
The Boundaries of Unconstitutionalityp. 244
Indexp. 261
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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