Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Aristocrats in Bourgeois Italy : the Piedmontese nobility, 1861-1930 /
Anthony L. Cardoza.
imprint
Cambridge : New York : Cambridge University Press, 1997.
description
xiv, 248 p. : ill.
ISBN
0521593034
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge : New York : Cambridge University Press, 1997.
isbn
0521593034
catalogue key
1757740
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1998-09-01:
Interpretation of the survival of aristocratic power in an age of bourgeois ascendancy in 19th-century Europe is marked by complexity and controversy. Some historians argue that the march of French Revolutionary ideas effectively obliterated Europe's aristocrats as commanding political, economic, and social forces, save in Britain. Others have discerned a convergence of aristocratic and bourgeois interests and groups during the course of the century; still others have pointed to the persistence of habits and to pockets of aristocratic power, such as the German military. Resting on an impressive array of sources from probate records to those of private schools and clubs, Cardoza's study of the Piedmontese nobility firmly indicates that its day did not end until after WW I. Piedmont was the effective unifier of Italy, and its institutions and preferences were incorporated into the new state. Its nobility continued to occupy positions of power, held places of prestige, and maintained its distance from the bourgeoisie for several decades, through intricate patterns of social networking and informal mechanisms. Essential to its survival was the aristocracy's ability to draw on deeply embedded social patterns and cultural values. An important contribution to Italian history and useful generally to historians of modern Europe. Upper-division undergraduates and above. N. Greene Wesleyan University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...a fine piece of scholarship." Rudolph M. Bell, American Historical Review
"An important contribution to Italian history and useful generally to historians of modern Europe. Upper-division undergraduates and above." Choice
"Anthony L. Cardoza of Loyola University of Chicago is the winner of the American Historical Association's Helen and Howard F. Marrano Prize. The book has been praised as a major contribution to our understanding of both the Italian and wider European nobility." The Historian
"...a valuable contribution to modern Italian historiography....another piece of the puzzle that is the unification and formation of the Italian nation....willprove useful to scholars who study either the history of railways or the European nobility." Charles L. Bertrand, Canadian Journal of History
"...Cardoza has produced a splendid account of an important component of Italian life. This book is recommended for college and university libraries, especially where graduate courses are offered." Andrew Rolle, History
'... clearly written, illustrated with vivid detail, and backed up by excellent quantitative research'. Economic History Review
'... clearly written, illustrated with vivid detail, and backed up by excellent quantitative research'.Economic History Review
‘… clearly written, illustrated with vivid detail, and backed up by excellent quantitative research.’Economic History Review
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 1998
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Challenging recent scholarship which stresses the marginality of the nobility from 1861, Cardoza highlights the continuing economic strength, social power and political influence of Italy's most prominent regional aristocracy after unification.
Description for Bookstore
This book provides the first full account of the Italian nobility in the post-unification era, and challenges recent interpretations that have stressed the rapid fusion of old and new elites by highlighting the continuing economic strength, social power and political influence of Italy's most prominent regional aristocracy. In Piedmont nobles developed more indirect forms of influence, while remaining a separate and exclusive group with limited social contacts with industrial or managerial elites, until World War I transformed their old way of life.
Description for Bookstore
This is a full account of the Italian nobility in the post-unification era. It challenges interpretations which have stressed the rapid fusion of old and new elites by highlighting the continuing economic strength, social power and political influence of Italy’s most prominent regional aristocracy.
Description for Bookstore
This is a full account of the Italian nobility in the post-unification era. It challenges interpretations which have stressed the rapid fusion of old and new elites by highlighting the continuing economic strength, social power and political influence of Italy's most prominent regional aristocracy.
Description for Library
This book provides a full account of the Italian nobility in the post-unification era. It challenges interpretations which have stressed the rapid fusion of old and new elites by highlighting the continuing economic strength, social power and political influence of Italy's most prominent regional aristocracy. In Piedmont, the nobles were able to develop more indirect forms of influence, while remaining a separate and exclusive group with limited social contacts with industrial or managerial elites, until World War I transformed their old way of life.
Main Description
This book provides a full account of the Italian nobility in the post-unification era. It challenges interpretations which have stressed the rapid fusion of old and new elites in Italy and the marginality of the nobility after 1861, and instead highlights the continuing economic strength, social power and political influence of Italy’s most prominent regional aristocracy. In Piedmont, the nobles were able to develop more indirect forms of influence to satisfy their hunger for leadership based on something older than constitutions or electoral politics. They remained a largely separate group within local society, distinguished by their attachment to the values of lineage, military service, landownership, and social exclusivity. This aristocratic exclusivity and influence survived the agricultural depression of the nineteenth century, before succumbing finally to the devastating effects of World War I.
Main Description
This book provides a full account of the Italian nobility in the post-unification era. It challenges interpretations which have stressed the rapid fusion of old and new elites in Italy and the marginality of the nobility after 1861, and instead highlights the continuing economic strength, social power and political influence of Italy's most prominent regional aristocracy. In Piedmont, the nobles were able to develop more indirect forms of influence to satisfy their hunger for leadership based on something older than constitutions or electoral politics. They remained a largely separate group within local society, distinguished by their attachment to the values of lineage, military service, landownership, and social exclusivity. This aristocratic exclusivity and influence survived the agricultural depression of the nineteenth century, before succumbing finally to the devastating effects of World War I.
Main Description
This book provides the first full account of the Italian Sobility in the post-unification era, and challenges recent interpretations that have stressed the rapid fusion of old and new elites by highlighting the continuing economic strength, social power and political influence of Italy's most prominent regional aristocracy. In Piedmont, the nobles developed more indirect forms of influence, while remaining a separate and exclusive group with limited social contacts with industrial or managerial elites, until World War I transformed their old way of life.
Table of Contents
List of tables
Acknowledgements
Introduction
The making of the Piedmontese nobility, 16001848
The long goodbye: aristocrats in politics and public life, 18481914
Old money: the scale and structure of aristocratic wealth
Perpetuating an aristocratic social elite
The limits of fusion: aristocratic-bourgeois relations in nineteenth-century Piedmont
Retreat and adaptation in the twentieth century
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem