Catalogue

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Sophiatown : coming of age in South Africa /
Don Mattera.
imprint
Boston : Beacon Press, 1989, c1987.
description
xxii, 151 p. ; 21 cm.
ISBN
0807002062 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
uniform title
imprint
Boston : Beacon Press, 1989, c1987.
isbn
0807002062 :
general note
British ed. published under title: Gone with the twilight.
catalogue key
1751086
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 1988-12-23:
This is the first-person account of the rise to political consciousness and activism of a notorious Coloured gang leader from the turbulent ghetto near Johannesburg, where blacks and whites lived side by side and created a vibrant culture, until the South African government razed it to the ground. Grandson of an Italian sailor who jumped ship and married a Xhosa woman, Mattera served several jail terms for public violence, joined the African National Congress, was put under house arrest for more than eight years and became a founder of the Union of Black Journalists and the Congress of South African Writers. In this short, inconclusive, evocative memoir, the poet-dramatist writes powerfully of his wretched life as a wild young man, of his people's struggle for liberation and of his own conversion from violence to the use of peaceful methods. He provides a searing view of a troubled land. (Feb.)
Appeared in Library Journal on 1989-02-15:
In South Africa the Coloureds stand between the whites and the natives in the government's racial spectrum. Although formally tagged as a Coloured, Mattera stood with the black native throughout the development of his political consciousness. Mattera's autobiography addresses his youth in a mixed-race suburb of Johannesburg from 1948 to 1962 and the destruction of his roots when Sophiatown was destroyed and its population moved. The pain and humiliation of apartheid sparked his rebellion against white and black police authority, and he became a powerful gang leader. With the growth of his politicization, however, he turned to drama and poetry to express his anger and despair in the face of white South African rule. A powerful memoir.-- John F. Riddick, Central Michigan Univ . , Mt. Pleasant
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews,
Publishers Weekly, December 1988
Booklist, February 1989
Library Journal, February 1989
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