Catalogue


Civilization and Black progress : selected writings of Alexander Crummell on the South /
edited by J.R. Oldfield.
imprint
Charlottesville : Published for the Southern Texts Society by the University Press of Virginia, 1995.
description
x, 265 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
081391602X (cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Charlottesville : Published for the Southern Texts Society by the University Press of Virginia, 1995.
isbn
081391602X (cloth)
catalogue key
1707042
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [232]-255) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1996-06-01:
Alexander Crummell (1819-1898), one of the most significant 19th-century African American intellectuals, believed fervently in the capabilities of blacks and the power of racial solidarity. He was an uncompromising critic of conditions for blacks in post-Reconstruction America and a vigorous opponent of Booker T. Washington's accommodationist philosophy. He had tremendous influence on W.E.B. Du Bois, who was inspired by Crummell's strident insistence on racial integrity and black rights. Crummell was educated at Yale Theological Seminary and at Cambridge; he was an influential Episcopal minister and the founder of the American Negro Academy, an organization of the black intellectual elite. He was clearly a leader within that small circle of educated, prosperous, and intellectually powerful African Americans, and his speeches and writings remained influential in the stream of black thought and leadership after the turn of the 20th century. This is the first scholarly collection of Crummell's most important writings, some 18 texts. Oldfield, who has written extensively on Crummell, has done an expert job of editing and annotating the selections. His 26-page introduction to this volume is excellent. Highly recommended for research libraries and those with special collection emphasis in African American culture and thought. R. Detweiler California State University, Dominguez Hills
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 1996
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Summaries
Main Description
Founder of the American Negro Academy, Alexander Crummell (1819--1898) played a pivotal role in later nineteenth-century debates over race and black intellect. Yet compared with the work of Du Bois and Washington, his speeches and publications have remained relatively inaccessible until now. Here are eighteen texts, along with a thorough biography and valuable source list. As this collection makes clear, Crummell's writings speak of a transitional figure who bridged two radically different worlds separated by the bloodshed and upheaval of the Civil War.
Unpaid Annotation
Friend and mentor to W. E. B. Du Bois, outspoken critic of Booker T. Washington, and founder of the American Negro Academy, Alexander Crummell (1819-1898) played a pivotal role in later nineteenth-century debates over race and black intellect. Yet compared with the widely available texts of Du Bois and Washington, Crummell's speeches and publications remain relatively inaccessible. Here, for the first time, is a full scholarly edition of Crummell's most significant writings on the South. The eighteen texts that J. R. Oldfield has assembled cover the last twenty-three years of Crummell's life, when he was at the height of his influence as both an Episcopal minister and president of the ANA. All of the pieces, directly or indirectly, are concerned with the fate of Southern blacks in the areas of politics, education, religion, gender, and race relations. Oldfield provides a thorough biography of Crummell in his introduction, as well as detailed annotations to the text, tracking down often-obscure sources for Crummell's numerous quotations. Additionally, Oldfield prefaces each address with a concise statement of its immediate context and its importance to Crummell's work as a whole. More specific publication information is listed in an Appendix. As this collection makes clear, Crummell's writings speak in the elegant and scholarly voice of a transitional figure who bridged two radically different worlds separated by the bloodshed and upheaval of the Civil War.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Introductionp. 1
Editorial Methodp. 27
The Social Principle among a People and Its Bearing on Their Progressp. 29
The Destined Superiority of the Negrop. 43
The Assassination of President Garfieldp. 54
The Dignity of Labour; and Its Value to a New Peoplep. 65
A Defence of the Negro Race and America from the Assaults on Charges of Rev. J. L. Tucker, D. D., of Jackson, Mississippip. 78
The Black Woman of the South: Her Neglects and Her Needsp. 101
Excellence, an End of the Trained Intellectp. 114
The Need of New Ideas and New Aims for a New Erap. 120
Common Sense in Common Schoolingp. 134
Right-Mindedness: An Address before the Garnet Lyceum, of Lincoln Universityp. 143
The Best Methods of Church Work among the Colored Peoplep. 155
The Race-Problem in Americap. 163
Incidents of Hope for the Negro Race in Americap. 174
At Hampton Institute, 1896p. 185
Civilization the Primal Need of the Racep. 195
The Prime Need of the Negro Racep. 200
The Attitude of the American Mind toward the Negro Intellectp. 204
Tracts for the Negro Racep. 215
Appendixp. 229
Notesp. 232
Indexp. 257
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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