Catalogue


Who owns learning? : questions of autonomy, choice, and control /
edited by Curt Dudley-Marling and Dennis Searle.
imprint
Portsmouth, NH : Heinemann, c1995.
description
x, 213 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0435088270 (acid-free paper)
format(s)
Other
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Portsmouth, NH : Heinemann, c1995.
isbn
0435088270 (acid-free paper)
catalogue key
1675000
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Students who do not have opportunities to control their lives in school may find it more difficult to control their lives outside of school. Ultimately, ownership isn't about learning, but about living. Creating a more just and democratic society depends on citizens who are willing and able to examine and, if necessary, to challenge the conditions of their lives and the lives of their fellow citizens."-from the Introduction
'¬úStudents who do not have opportunities to control their lives in school may find it more difficult to control their lives outside of school. Ultimately, ownership isn't about learning, but about living. Creating a more just and democratic society depends on citizens who are willing and able to examine and, if necessary, to challenge the conditions of their lives and the lives of their fellow citizens.'¬Ě' from the Introduction
"Students who do not have opportunities to control their lives in school may find it more difficult to control their lives outside of school. Ultimately, ownership isn't about learning, but about living. Creating a more just and democratic society depends on citizens who are willing and able to examine and, if necessary, to challenge the conditions of their lives and the lives of their fellow citizens."- from the Introduction
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Clearly ownership cannot mean that teachers withdraw their support for students, but how do teachers strike a balance without threatening students' personal investment?
Long Description
The concept of student ownership has provoked considerable debate in current language arts theory and practice. Clearly ownership cannot mean that teachers withdraw their support for students, but how do teachers strike a balance without threatening students' personal investment? And how do individual and cultural differences figure into this equation?To answer these and other questions about ownership, Curt Dudley-Marling and Dennis Searle have asked outstanding teachers and scholars to share their own thoughts and experiences. The result is a remarkable collection of essays on a range of views. Some of the contributors reflect on practice, illustrating how they support student intentions without abdicating their responsibility to "teach." Others offer a more theoretical perspective, arguing that ownership is a more subtle and complex notion than previously imagined.
Long Description
The concept of student ownership has provoked considerable debate in current language arts theory and practice. Clearly ownership cannot mean that teachers withdraw their support for students, but how do teachers strike a balance without threatening students' personal investment? And how do individual and cultural differences figure into this equation? To answer these and other questions about ownership, Curt Dudley-Marling and Dennis Searle have asked outstanding teachers and scholars to share their own thoughts and experiences. The result is a remarkable collection of essays on a range of views. Some of the contributors reflect on practice, illustrating how they support student intentions without abdicating their responsibility to "teach." Others offer a more theoretical perspective, arguing that ownership is a more subtle and complex notion than previously imagined.
Long Description
Students who do not have opportunities to control their lives in school may find it more difficult to control their lives outside of school. Ultimately, ownership isn't about learning, but about living. Creating a more just and democratic society depends on citizens who are willing and able to examine and, if necessary, to challenge the conditions of their lives and the lives of their fellow citizens. - from the Introduction The concept of student ownership has provoked considerable debate in current language arts theory and practice. Clearly ownership cannot mean that teachers withdraw their support for students, but how do teachers strike a balance without threatening students' personal investment? And how do individual and cultural differences figure into this equation? To answer these and other questions about ownership, Curt Dudley-Marling and Dennis Searle have asked outstanding teachers and scholars to share their own thoughts and experiences. The result is a remarkable collection of essays on a range of views. Some of the contributors reflect on practice, illustrating how they support student intentions without abdicating their responsibility to "teach." Others offer a more theoretical perspective, arguing that ownership is a more subtle and complex notion than previously imagined.
Table of Contents
Complicating Ownership
Understanding Ownership in Classroom Interaction
Students and Teachers: Sharing Ownership and Responsibility in Reading
Reading with Friends: A Peer-Tutored Reading Program
Self-Reflection: Supporting Students in Taking Ownership of Evaluation
Integrating Social Studies and Whole Language in a Middle School: Finding a Core in Chore
Lessons from Little Bear
Ownership for the Special Needs Child: Individual and Educational Dilemmas
The Power of Influence: Effecting Change by Developing Ownership
Dialectics of Ownership: Language as Property
Writing a Difference in the World: Beyond Ownership and Authorship
Liberating Student Intention and Association: Toward What Ends?
Scaffolding: Who's Building Whose Building?
Teaching and Learning Together in Teacher Education: "Making Easter,"
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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