Catalogue


Concord and conflict : the United States and Russia, 1867-1914 /
Norman E. Saul.
imprint
Lawrence, Kan. : University Press of Kansas, c1996.
description
xviii, 654 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0700607544 (hardback : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lawrence, Kan. : University Press of Kansas, c1996.
isbn
0700607544 (hardback : alk. paper)
general note
"Continues the history of the Russian-American experience begun in Distant friends"--Pref.
catalogue key
1673837
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 601-634) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1996-07-01:
The second of a proposed three-volume series on Russian-American relations, Saul's book covers the nexus from 1867 to 1914 in exquisitely detailed fashion. Examining topics ranging from immigration, famine relief, antisemitism and pogroms, and the revolutionary movement to the Russo-Japanese War, agriculture, cultural contacts, and business, Saul has captured a significant portion of the context of American-Russian relations. However, readers are left on the eve of WW I with no insight into the diplomatic constructs that brought Russia there, including the Dual Alliance, the Franco-Russian Alliance, the retirement of Bismarck, and both the Franco-Prussian and Russo-Turkish War, although American ministers provided detailed analyses. Further, although Saul correctly perceives that antisemitism, the Siberian exile system, the growing reactionary stance of the imperial family and key advisors, and the apparent pro-Japanese American attitude in the Russo-Japanese War helped cool Russian-American amity, he does not note that the common bond of hostility toward Britain so visible as part of the "concord" of the first half of the 19th century was diminished by growing Anglo-American rapprochement. Nonetheless, this book is both the most comprehensive treatment and the best incorporation of all voices in the Russian-American story from the Alaska purchase to the eve of WW I. All levels. C. W. Haury Piedmont Virginia Community College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, June 1996
Choice, July 1996
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Between 1867 - the year of the Alaskan purchase - and the beginning of World War I, Russian and American dignitaries, diplomats, businessmen, writers, tourists, and entertainers crossed between the two countries in surprisingly great numbers. Concord and Conflict provides the first comprehensive investigation of this highly transformational and fateful era in Russian-American relations. Excavating previously unmined Russian and American archives, Norman Saul illuminates these fifty significant - and open - years of association between the two countries. He explores the flow and fluctuation of economic, diplomatic, social, and cultural affairs; the personal and professional conflicts and scandals; and the evolution of each nation's perception of the other.
Main Description
In 1867 Mark Twain cruised into the Black Sea on the first American tourist ship to visit in Russia. Just a few years later Russian Grand Duke Alexis in turn was hunting buffalo and drinking champagne on the Nebraska prairie. Both were taking advantage of a growing, if precarious, alliance between two of the worlds most influential nations. In fact, as Norman Saul reveals, between 1867-the year of the Alaskan purchase-and the beginning of World War I, Russian and American dignitaries, diplomats, businessmen, writers, tourists, and entertainers crossed between the two countries in far greater numbers than was previously known. Following the widely praised Distant Friends, volume one of Sauls trilogy on Russian American relations, Concord and Conflict provides the first comprehensive investigation of this highly transformational and fateful era in Russian-American relations. Excavating previously unmined Russian and American archives, he explores the flow and fluctuation of economic, diplomatic, social, and cultural affairs; personal and professional conflicts and scandals; and the evolution of each nations perception of the other. At first concentrating on their similarities following the American Civil War, Saul contends, the Russian and American people established a tradition of friendship in the absence of major controversy. In many ways, they felt bound by a sense of common destiny, corresponding periods of reform and progress, and a mutual hostility toward the "older" European powers. Throughout Russia, American trademarks became familiar as U.S. companies such as Singer, New York Life, Westinghouse, and International Harvester took root. Hard winter wheat-today a vital American crop-was introduced by Russian immigrants. The Smithsonian established an information exchange with the Russian government. War and Peace was translated into English and widely distributed in the United States. And the first YMCA was established in Russia. As progressive reform waned in 1880s Russia, however, Americans became increasingly leery of Russias repressive internal tactics, hostility toward Jews, open-door policy toward China, and expansion in the Far East while Russians found Americas actions and attitudes hypocritical and equally confusing. Yet despite deterioration of diplomatic ties, Saul shows, a semblance of kinship endured into the twentieth century as cultural exchanges and business opportunities continued to escalated. Illuminating fifty of the most significant-and surprisingly open-years of this frequently tumultuous and contradictory association, Concord and Conflict reaffirms Sauls status as "the leading American authority on Russian-American relations before 1917" (Journal of American History).
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations
Preface
Note on Transliteration and Spelling
Abbreviations Used in Notes
Innocents Abroad, 1867-1874p. 1
War and Technology, 1870sp. 87
Close Encounters, 1867-1880p. 167
Crime and Punishment, 1880sp. 233
Bread and Sympathy, 1890-1898p. 311
Disharmony and War, 1898-1905p. 421
Hopes and Fears, 1905-1914p. 509
Conclusion: Concord or Conflictp. 589
Appendix A: American Ministers and Ambassadors in Russiap. 593
Appendix B: Russian Ministers and Ambassadors to the United Statesp. 595
Appendix C: Foreign Ministers/Secretaries of State, 1867-1914p. 596
Appendix D: Secretaries of Legation and Consuls in Russiap. 597
Bibliographyp. 601
Indexp. 635
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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