Catalogue


Greeks bearing gifts : the public use of private relationships in the Greek world, 435-323 B.C. /
Lynette G. Mitchell.
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 1997.
description
xiv, 248 p.
ISBN
0521554357
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 1997.
isbn
0521554357
catalogue key
1642454
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Along with classical scholars, the book will be especially valuable for biblicists interested in the Persian Period and early Hellinism. It clarifies the Hellenistic moorings of what it meant to be a 'friend of Caesal' or to call Abraham 'the friend of God'." Religious Studies Review
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Summaries
Main Description
Using models from social anthropology as its basis, this book looks at the role of personal relationships in classical Greece and their bearing on interstate politics. It begins with a discussion of what friendship meant in the Greek world of the classical period, and then shows how the models for friendship in the private sphere were mirrored in the public sphere at both domestic and interstate level. As well as relations between Greeks (in particular those in Athens and Sparta), Dr Mitchell looks at Greek relations with those on the margins of the Greek world, particularly the state of Macedon, and with neighbouring non-Greeks such as the Thracians and the Persians. She finds that these other cultures did not always have the same understanding of what friendship was, and that this led to misunderstandings and difficulties in the relations between non-Greeks and Greeks.
Description for Library
Using models from social anthropology as its basis, this book looks at the political role of personal relationships in classical Greece. It examines what friendship and exchange meant in classical Greece, how this differed from gift-giving and exchange in non-Greek societies, and what the impact of friends and friendship was on domestic and interstate politics and how the differences in understanding affected Greek relations with their non-Greek neighbours.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Mitchell begins with a discussion of what friendship meant in the Greek world of the classical period, then shows how models for friendship in the private sphere were mirrored in the public sphere at both domestic and interstate level.
Description for Bookstore
Using models from social anthropology as its basis, this book looks at the role of personal relationships in classical Greece and their bearing on interstate politics. It begins with a discussion of what friendship meant in the Greek world of the classical period, and then shows how the models for friendship in the private sphere were mirrored in the public sphere at both domestic and interstate level.
Description for Bookstore
Using models from social anthropology as its basis, this book takes a new look at the political role of personal relationships in classical Greece. It examines what friendship and exchange meant in classical Greece, how this differed from gift-giving and exchange in non-Greek societies, and what the impact of friends and friendship was on domestic and interstate politics and how the differences in understanding affected Greek relations with their non-Greek neighbours.
Main Description
Using models from social anthropology as its basis, this book takes a new look at the political role of personal relationships in classical Greece. It examines what friendship and exchange meant in classical Greece, how this differed from gift giving and exchange in non-Greek societies, and what the impact of friends and friendship was on domestic and interstate politics and how the differences in understanding affected Greek relations with their non-Greek neighbors.
Table of Contents
Philia
Philia and the polis
Philia and political activity
Magisterial appointments: Sparta
Magisterial appointments: Athens
Persia and the Greeks
Athenians and Thracians
Philip and the Greeks
Alexander
Friendship and ideology
Magistrates with connections
Notes on magistrates for the years 435-323 BC
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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