Catalogue


New novel, new wave, new politics : fiction and the representation of history in postwar France /
Lynn A. Higgins.
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c1996.
description
ix, 259 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0803223773 (cl : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
series title
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c1996.
isbn
0803223773 (cl : alk. paper)
catalogue key
1631476
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 219-250) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1996-10-01:
Higgins (Dartmouth College), author of Parables of Theory: Jean Ricardou's Metafiction (1984), has written an important book. With its perceptive analysis of works by Duras, Malle, Robbe-Grillet, Simon, and Truffaut, the volume will serve as an excellent resource for courses in literature and film; it should, however, also be read by those interested in contemporary French society. Higgins posits that, beyond their "shared ecriture," the "new novel" and New Wave have in common an interest in the workings of historiography. She shows how the "retreat into formalism" may be attributed to the censorship of the early 1960s, when France was fighting its war of decolonization in Algeria. Higgins analyzes the May '68 crisis in France for "what it made it possible to say." Finally, she tackles the discourse on WW II, emphasizing the issue of personal responsibility. She looks at France's "murky role" in the war and the obstacle to reflection posed by the "official myth of the Resistance." Her extensive notes reveal that Higgins has read widely in politics, psychoanalysis, and history as well as in literature and film theory. Her prose remains, nonetheless, thoroughly accessible through the use of concrete examples and the avoidance of jargon. No comparable study exists. A must for all academic collections. A. M. Rea Occidental College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"An important book . . . No comparable study exists."- Choice
"An important book . . . No comparable study exists."Choice
"An important book . . . No comparable study exists." Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 1996
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Until now, writings on the celebrated movements in literature and film that emerged in France in the mid-1950sthe New Novel and New Wavehave concentrated on their formal innovations, not on their engagement with history or politics.New Novel, New Wave, New Politicsoverturns this traditional approach. Lynn A. Higgins argues that the New Novelists (e.g., Alain Robbe-Grillet, Claude Simon, Marguerite Duras) and New Wave filmmakers (e.g., Francois Truffaut, Jean-Luc Godard, Alain Resnais) "engage in a kind of historiography. . . . They enact the conflicts, the double binds of postwar history and representation." Higgins claims that what art historian Serge Guilbaut has said of American Abstract Expressionism is equally true of the New Novel and New Wavethat its aesthetic innovations "provided a way for avant-garde artists to preserve their sense of social 'commitment' . . . while eschewing the art of propaganda and illustration. It was in a sense a political apoliticism." This lively account dramatically revises our view of a generation of important, influential artists.
Main Description
Until now, writings on the celebrated movements in literature and film that emerged in France in the mid-1950sthe New Novel and New Wavehave concentrated on their formal innovations, not on their engagement with history or politics. New Novel, New Wave, New Politicsoverturns this traditional approach. Lynn A. Higgins argues that the New Novelists (e.g., Alain Robbe-Grillet, Claude Simon, Marguerite Duras) and New Wave filmmakers (e.g., Francois Truffaut, Jean-Luc Godard, Alain Resnais) "engage in a kind of historiography. . . . They enact the conflicts, the double binds of postwar history and representation." Higgins claims that what art historian Serge Guilbaut has said of American Abstract Expressionism is equally true of the New Novel and New Wavethat its aesthetic innovations "provided a way for avant-garde artists to preserve their sense of social 'commitment' . . . while eschewing the art of propaganda and illustration. It was in a sense a political apoliticism." This lively account dramatically revises our view of a generation of important, influential artists.
Table of Contents
Illustrations
Preface
Introduction: The Politics of Stylep. 1
1959-1964
Myths of Textual Autonomy: From Psychoanalysis to Historiography in Hiroshima mon amourp. 19
Problems of Plotting: La Route des Flandresp. 55
Figuring Out: L'Annee derniere a Marienbadp. 83
After 1968
Signs of the Times: Fictions of May 1968p. 115
Primal Scenes: The Occupation Viewed from the Eighties
Truffaut's Otohistoriographyp. 143
Durasian (Pre)Occupationsp. 169
Looks That Kill: Louis Malle's Portraits of Collaborationp. 186
Conclusion: The New Novel, the New Wave, and National Identityp. 207
Notesp. 219
Indexp. 251
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem