Catalogue


Italian industrialists from liberalism to fascism : the political development of the industrial bourgeoisie, 1906-1934 /
Franklin Hugh Adler.
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York, NY : Cambridge University Press, 1995.
description
xv, 458 p.
ISBN
0521434068
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York, NY : Cambridge University Press, 1995.
isbn
0521434068
catalogue key
1629424
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1996-10-01:
Adler's important new study of Italian industrialists focuses on the period from late-19th-century liberalism to the rise of Fascism in the 1920s. Unlike the dispute in the 1980s over business complicity in the rise of German Fascism, Adler avoids the structuralism of David Abraham (The Collapse of the Weimar Republic, CH, Oct'81; 2nd ed., 1986), or the antitheoretical position of Henry Turner (German Big Business and the Rise of Hitler, CH, May'85), and does not deal with the idiosyncratic behavior and disproportionate influence of the industrialists' politics. Instead, he locates the proper study of business politics in class organizations, lobbying groups, and industrial associations that created a general class attitude or position. These broader agencies, he argues, provide surer insight into the Giolitti era and the crises of WW I, the postwar period, and the early Fascist era--a period of international crisis, the rise of large labor organizations, war production, and the threat of Fascist intrusion. The monograph furnishes a deep picture of the Italian business class and its institutions. It is an unusual history useful for general readers interested in one of modern Italy's most crucial periods, as well as a theoretical and methodological work of value to scholars and graduate students trying to puzzle out the "new political history." R. W. Kern University of New Mexico
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Adler's rich historical account...succeeds in stripping the debate over the relation between industrialists and fascism of many of the facile assumptions that have often clouded the issue." Dwayne Woods, Telos
"The monograph furnishes a deep picture of the Italian business class and its institutions. It is an unusual history useful for general readers interested in one of modern Italy's most crucial periods, as well as a theoretical and methodological work of value to scholars and graduate students trying to puzzle out the 'new political history.'" Choice
"...there is quite a wealth of thought-provoking material in this fascinating and very well-written book." Brian A'Hearn, The Journal of Economic History
"Adler's monumental study makes several unique and original contributions to our understanding of the role of Italy's industrial associations in the coming to power of fascism in that country....[his] lucid, richly detailed, and compelling account will stand as the benchmark study of this topic for years to come; it also makes a major contribution to the general field of comparative political development." Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 1996
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Summaries
Main Description
The Croix de Feu and its successor the Parti Social Fran├žais stood at the centre of political conflict in the turbulent final years of the French Third Republic. Membership peaked at 750,000 in 1937, and at the time the movement was widely regarded as the counterpart of fascism in Germany and Italy. However, only recently has the view that fascism also has roots in France become a serious topic for debate. From Liberalism to Fascism is based largely on archival research, and shows that contemporary perceptions of the Croix de Feu and the PSF as fascist were in fact correct. Dr Passmore places French fascism in the wider context of the history of French conservatism through a micro-study of a crisis of the liberal-conservative tradition in Lyon. This book is the first to place the emergence of French fascism in the wider political and social context. In the process, received views of the nature of French society and politics are contested.
Description for Bookstore
In tracing the development of industrial associations in Italy from 1906 to 1934, this study challenges traditional interpretations of the rise of fascism. Unlike other studies on industrialists and fascism which begin with the post-World War One crisis, Professor Adler reconstitutes the prior relations between industrialists and Italian liberalism, and then situates industrialists within the liberal crisis and the transition to fascism. Adler's study is theoretically informed by current interests in assessing interpretations of fascism, relating corporatism to crises in liberalism, and applying hermeneutics to historical analysis.
Description for Bookstore
This study traces the development of industrial associations in Italy from 1906 to 1934. The account begins in the formative liberal period which preceded World War I, and then analyses how industrialists responded in the post-war period to the crisis of liberalism and the rise of fascism.
Description for Library
In tracing the development of industrial associations in Italy from 1906 to 1934, this study challenges traditional interpretations of the rise of fascism. Unlike other studies on industrialists and fascism which begin with the post-World War I crisis, Professor Adler reconstitutes the prior relations between industrialists and Italian liberalism, and then situates industrialists within the liberal crisis and the transition to fascism. Adler's study is theoretically informed by current interests in assessing interpretations of fascism, relating corporatism to crises in liberalism, and applying hermeneutics to historical analysis.
Main Description
In tracing the development of industrial associations in Italy from 1906 to 1934, this study challenges traditional interpretations of the rise of fascism. Unlike other studies of industrialists and fascism that begin with the post-World War I crisis, Professor Adler reconstitutes the prior relations between industrialists and Italian liberalism, and then situates industrialists within the liberal crisis and the transition to fascism. Adler's study is theoretically informed by current interests in assessing interpretations of fascism, relating corporatism to crises in liberalism, and applying hermeneutics to historical analysis.
Main Description
The Croix de Feu and its successor the Parti Social Fran ais stood at the centre of political conflict in the turbulent final years of the French Third Republic. Membership peaked at 750,000 in 1937, and at the time the movement was widely regarded as the counterpart of fascism in Germany and Italy. However, only recently has the view that fascism also has roots in France become a serious topic for debate. From Liberalism to Fascism is based largely on archival research, and shows that contemporary perceptions of the Croix de Feu and the PSF as fascist were in fact correct. Dr Passmore places French fascism in the wider context of the history of French conservatism through a micro-study of a crisis of the liberal-conservative tradition in Lyon. This book is the first to place the emergence of French fascism in the wider political and social context. In the process, received views of the nature of French society and politics are contested.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Associational development during the Giolitti era
The First World War: a precorporatist experience
The post-war crisis and the rise of Fascism
Liberal-Fascism
Industrialists and non-integral corporatism
Conclusion
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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