Catalogue


Realism, representation, and the arts in nineteenth-century literature /
Alison Byerly.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1997.
description
x, 231 p. : ill.
ISBN
0521581168
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1997.
isbn
0521581168
catalogue key
1611332
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1998-12:
Byerly's 16 pages of bibliography reflect the considerable scholarship of the past 25 years on Victorian theatrical and musical performance, art as painting or illustration, and architecture as cultural record. Victorian novelists used the arts as a "metatext," creating fictional descriptions of performances, narrative commentary on them, and descriptions of paintings or allusions to them. For Thackeray and Charlotte Bront"e, theatrical and other arts can overcome authenticity. In Eliot's novels, theater dissembles, visual art detaches its fictional viewers from reality, and music alone represents truth--though, paradoxically, references to pictorialism and theatrical staging are part of her way of representing "reality" (a distinction foreseen by J. Hillis Miller in his "Optic and Semiotic in Middlemarch," Harvard English Studies 6, 1975). Hardy sees painting as truthfully representing surfaces, whereas music reflects a character's responsiveness, and architecture gives form to cultural memory. Wilde and Pater use the arts for aesthetic pleasure. "Realism" is a perplexing term, and readers may wish to first consult Realism and Representation, ed. George Levine (1993). And Byerly (Middlebury College) needs to ground the "metatext" and distinguish between descriptions of art, including performances, and allusions to them and characters' feelings about them. Actual art receives limited mention. Recommended for graduate students, researchers, and faculty. R. E. Wiehe; University of Massachusetts at Lowell
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Alison Byerly's rich, stimulating, wide-ranging, and admirably compact new book raises a provocative set of questions." Australasian Victorian Studies Journal
' ... an impressive study of the representation of painting, music and the theatre in the works of Charlotte Bronte, William Thackeray, George Eliot, Thomas Hardy ... a significant work in interdisciplinary studies of literature.' Andrew Brown, Magdalene College, Cambridge University
'... an impressive study of the representation of painting, music and the theatre in the works of Charlotte Brontë, William Thackeray, George Eliot, Thomas Hardy ... a significant work in interdisciplinary studies of literature.'Andrew Brown, Magdalene College, Cambridge University
‘… an impressive study of the representation of painting, music and the theatre in the works of Charlotte Brontë, William Thackeray, George Eliot, Thomas Hardy … a significant work in interdisciplinary studies of literature.’Andrew Brown, Magdalene College, Cambridge University
'… an impressive study of the representation of painting, music and the theatre in the works of Charlotte Bront, William Thackeray, George Eliot, Thomas Hardy … a significant work in interdisciplinary studies of literature.' Andrew Brown, Magdalene College, Cambridge University
"... a persuasive, thoroughly readable, and well-constructed book." Jennifer Green-Lewis, Victorian Studies
"...a useful and stimulating contribution to studies of the interrelations among the arts in Victorian England...All students will enjoy and, one hopes, learn something from Byerly's clear thinking and writing." Modern Philology
"Byerly's 16 pages of bibliography reflect the considerable scholarship of the past 25 years on Victorian theatrical and musical performance, art as painting or illustration, and architecture as cultural record." Choice
"...makes an important contribution to the study of Victorian culture." Victorian Periodicals Review
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 1998
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In this volume, Alison Byerly combines close textual analysis with discussion of relevant ancillary topics to examine the place of different arts within 19th century British culture.
Description for Bookstore
This book examines the representation of a variety of arts SH primarily painting, theatre, and music SH within the work of major nineteenth-century novelists. It charts a historical progression, from Romantic poetry, through mid-century Realism, to Aestheticism, showing how authors used references to other forms of art to illuminate their own aesthetic ideals. Examining the aesthetic theory and cultural practice of different arts, Alison Byerly demonstrates the importance of artistic representation to the development of Victorian Realism.
Description for Bookstore
This book examines the representation of painting, theatre, and music within the work of major nineteenth-century novelists. Examining the aesthetic theory and cultural practice of different arts, Alison Byerly demonstrates the importance of artistic representation to the development of Victorian Realism.
Description for Library
This book examines the representation of a variety of arts - primarily painting, theatre, and music - within the work of major nineteenth-century novelists. It charts a historical progression, from Romantic poetry, through mid-century Realism, to Aestheticism, showing how authors used references to other forms of art to illuminate their own aesthetic ideals. Examining the aesthetic theory and cultural practice of different arts, Alison Byerly demonstrates the importance of artistic representation to the development of Victorian Realism.
Main Description
This book confronts a significant paradox in the development of literary realism: the very novels that present themselves as purveyors and celebrants of direct, ordinary human experience also manifest an obsession with art that threatens to sabotage their Realist claims. Unlike previous studies of the role of visual art, or music, or theatre in Victorian literature, Realism, Representation, and the Arts in Nineteenth-Century Literature examines the juxtaposition of all of these arts in the works of Charlotte Brontë, William Thackeray, George Eliot, Thomas Hardy, and others. Alison Byerly combines close textual analysis with discussion of relevant ancillary topics to illuminate the place of different arts within nineteenth-century British culture. Her book, which also contains sixteen illustrations, represents an effort to bridge the growing gap between aesthetics and cultural studies.
Main Description
This book confronts a significant paradox in the development of literary realism: the very novels that present themselves as purveyors and celebrants of direct, ordinary human experience also manifest an obsession with art that threatens to sabotage their Realist claims. Unlike previous studies of the role of visual art, or music, or theatre in Victorian literature, Realism, Representation, and the Arts in Nineteenth-Century Literature examines the juxtaposition of all of these arts in the works of Charlotte Bront, William Thackeray, George Eliot, Thomas Hardy, and others. Alison Byerly combines close textual analysis with discussion of relevant ancillary topics to illuminate the place of different arts within nineteenth-century British culture. Her book, which also contains sixteen illustrations, represents an effort to bridge the growing gap between aesthetics and cultural studies.
Main Description
This book examines the representation of a variety of arts--primarily painting, theater, and music--within the work of major nineteenth-century novelists. It charts a historical progression, from Romantic poetry, through mid-century Realism, to Aestheticism, showing how authors used references to other forms of art to illuminate their own aesthetic ideals. Examining the aesthetic theory and cultural practice of different arts, Alison Byerly demonstrates the importance of artistic representation to the development of Victorian Realism.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Introduction
The picturesque aesthetic and the natural art of song
Masterpiece theatres: art as spectacle in William Thackeray and Charlotte Brontd
George Eliot's hierarchy of representation
Art works: Thomas Hardy and the labor of creation
Coda: aestheticism: the erasure of the real
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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