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The frontier in the colonial South : South Carolina backcountry, 1736-1800 /
George Lloyd Johnson, Jr.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 1997.
description
xvi, 200 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0313301794 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 1997.
isbn
0313301794 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
1591284
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [171]-184) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1998-03-01:
The title of this brief work is a bit misleading, but the topic is important. Johnson has produced a case study of the Pee Dee River region of South Carolina, not of the entire backcountry. He organizes the study around three central themes: the importance of religion, particularly of the Baptist Church; the advance of commercial agriculture through the cultivation of indigo; and a developing transportation network that changed personal and commercial relations in the backcountry by the beginning of the 19th century. In the process he examines the Regulator movement of the 1760s, the emergence of a slaveholding elite, and the impact of church communities in the settlement of the region. The forces behind these changes led the Pee Dee River region to be more closely attached to urban Charleston or Georgetown than to the rural backcountry. Although searches for parallels with other studies of the Colonial frontier, Johnson also indicates that since most of the South Carolina backcountry regions were unique, more studies of this sort are very much needed. Replete with tables and maps documenting economic growth and geographic expansion, this work should appeal particularly to specialists in the Colonial period, the South, or the frontier experience. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. Andrew Franklin and Marshall College
Reviews
Review Quotes
'œJohnson's excellent account, served by his easily readable style and supported by the generous use of graphs, tables, and several of his won photographs, is about life in one rural backcountry area of South Carolina, namely the Welsh Tract of the upper Pee Dee. Johnson's rich history is highly recommended to all who are eager to read further about our social roots in the eighteenth century.'' South Carolins Historical Magazine
"Johnson's excellent account, served by his easily readable style and supported by the generous use of graphs, tables, and several of his won photographs, is about life in one rural backcountry area of South Carolina, namely the Welsh Tract of the upper Pee Dee. Johnson's rich history is highly recommended to all who are eager to read further about our social roots in the eighteenth century."- South Carolins Historical Magazine
'œReplete with tables and maps documenting economic growth and geographic expansion, this work should appeal particularly to specialists in the Colonial period, the South, or the frontier experience.'' Choice
"Replete with tables and maps documenting economic growth and geographic expansion, this work should appeal particularly to specialists in the Colonial period, the South, or the frontier experience."- Choice
'œ[T]he strength of this book is in its details and in the sensitivity of its discussions of such individual subjects as "Religious Diversity" and "Material Culture and Slaves"....Johnson's book represents a piece of valuable research, and this reviewer commends it to anyone who has a serious interest in the early history of the Pee Dee or in the backcountry in general.'' The Journal of Southern History
"[T]he strength of this book is in its details and in the sensitivity of its discussions of such individual subjects as "Religious Diversity" and "Material Culture and Slaves"....Johnson's book represents a piece of valuable research, and this reviewer commends it to anyone who has a serious interest in the early history of the Pee Dee or in the backcountry in general."- The Journal of Southern History
'œThis is a well-documented, carefully argued book written in lively and engaging prose. It deserves a wide audience of scholars in history, anthropology, Native American studies, women's studies, southern history, and culture studies and, most certainly, of interested lay persons. It is an exceptional piece of scholarship that I highly recommend.'' William and Mary Quarterly
"This is a well-documented, carefully argued book written in lively and engaging prose. It deserves a wide audience of scholars in history, anthropology, Native American studies, women's studies, southern history, and culture studies and, most certainly, of interested lay persons. It is an exceptional piece of scholarship that I highly recommend."- William and Mary Quarterly
'œThis is a well-done local study that has effectively mined available sources to provide an interesting picture of an eighteenth-century South Carolina community.'' The Journal of American History
"This is a well-done local study that has effectively mined available sources to provide an interesting picture of an eighteenth-century South Carolina community."- The Journal of American History
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 1998
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
Using the New Social History method and examining nearly every document produced over the years covered, this study examines the growth of communities in the Upper Pee Dee region of the South Carolina backcountry in the 18th century. The study considers the emergence of a landed elite, slavery, and a mobile population, plus the disestablishment of the Anglican Church. Inhabitants of the Cheraws District had access to a river that flowed to the coast, allowing them to transport their agricultural produce to the market at Georgetown. This ease of transportation enabled the district to become more developed than other regions of the South Carolina backcountry. In the 1770s, local inhabitants built a courthouse and a jail, and members of the rising planter class formed St. David's Society to educate parish youth. Records from two of the oldest Baptist churches in the South provide clues to communal cohesion and ethnicity. These accounts, combined with land and probate records, provide information concerning settlement, wealth, and slaveholding patterns in the region.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations
List of Abbreviations
Acknowledgments
Introduction
The Early Settlers Yeomen Farmers, Planters, Storekeepers, Merchants, and the Local
Economy Material Culture and Slaves
Transportation, Communication, and Education
The Regulator Movement and the American Revolution
Religious Diversity and Reconciliation among the Baptists
Conclusion
Selected Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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