Catalogue


The carnivalization of politics : Quebec cartoons on relations with Canada, England and France, 1960-1979 /
Raymond N. Morris.
imprint
Montreal : McGill-Queen's University Press, 1995.
description
xii, 148 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0773513183
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Montreal : McGill-Queen's University Press, 1995.
isbn
0773513183
catalogue key
1547647
 
Includes bibliographic references (p. [137]-142) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1996-06-01:
Canadian cartoonists are arguably among the very best in the world. The late Duncan Macpherson of the Toronto Star produced superb, biting images every day for years, and Aislin, the Montreal Gazette's long-time resident genius, does the same. There are a least six more artists of near-equal brilliance, who daily inform and infuriate readers. But how much analysis can their work sustain? Can it resist the semiotic analysis of academic sociologists? Apparently not, as this book demonstrates. Morris (Glendon College, York Univ.) observes that the reader "seeks to negotiate" the cartoon's meaning "in the light of certain social expectations and conventions." His own Marxist expectations are clear: cartoons further the interests of capital by attacking politicians and thus stressing that power lies with business. In this context, Morris examines Quebec cartoons on relations between Quebec and Canada, and Quebec and England and France. The result is the carnivalization of politics, with so much mocking of politicians and political events that they become ridiculous. That all cartoonists do this, wherever they are located, seems not to have occurred to Morris. What we have here is the carnivalization of scholarship, enough so as to make this reader "anti-Semiotic." J. L. Granatstein York University
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This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 1996
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Summaries
Main Description
Examining cartoons published between 1960 and 1979, Morris shows how the artists dealt with particular aspects of Quebec's political experience. He looks at Berthio's drawings on Queen Elizabeth's visit and Dupras's on President de Gaulle's; Girerd's and Berthio's on Quebec-Ottawa relations; Girerd's on the referendum campaign; and Girerd's and Aislin's on the English minority in Quebec. He points out recurring tensions, oppositions, and associations and analyses them from a sociological perspective. One of Morris's major objectives is to better understand the framework through which ideas presented in cartoons are filtered to their audience, focusing on the metaphors that underlie the frame, message, content, and form of the cartoons. Morris argues that the carnivalization of political figures and events, whereby the social structure is mockingly inverted and society's values and taboos are exaggerated until they become ridiculous, is a central metaphor governing Quebec cartoons of this period. He also explores the metaphor of the family, with England and France as grandparents, Canada and Quebec as parents, and the official-language minorities as children.
Unpaid Annotation
Examining cartoons published between 1960 and 1979, Raymond Morris shows how artists dealt with particular aspects of Quebec's political experience. He looks at Berthio's drawings on Queen Elizabeth's visit and Dupras's on President de Gaulle's; Girerd's and Berthio's on Quebec-Ottawa relations; Girerd's on the referendum campaign; and Girerd's and Aislin's on the English minority in Quebec. He points out recurring tensions, oppositions, and associations and analyses them from a sociological perspective. One of Morris's major objectives is to better understand the framework through which ideas presented in cartoons are filtered to their audience, particularly the metaphors that underlie the frame, message, content, and form of the cartoons. Morris argues that the carnivalization of political figures and events, whereby the social structure is mockingly inverted and society's values and taboos are exaggerated until they become ridiculous, is a central metaphor governing Quebec cartoons of this period. He also explores the metaphor of the family, with England and France as grandparents, Canada and Quebec as parents, and the official-language minorities as children.
Table of Contents
Figures
Acknowledgments
Editorial Cartoons as Social Documentsp. 3
Relations with In-Laws: Berthio Greets the Queenp. 13
Relations with Parents: Dupras Welcomes President de Gaullep. 37
Quebec and Ottawa as Spouses: Can They Live Together?p. 60
Ottawa and Quebec: Can They Live Apart?p. 83
Between Parent and Child: Quebec and its Language Minorityp. 107
Conclusionsp. 126
Referencesp. 137
Indexp. 143
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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