Catalogue


Migration and ethnicity in Chinese history: Hakkas, Pengmin, and their neighbors /
Sow-Theng Leong ; edited by Tim Wright, with an introduction and maps by G. William Skinner.
imprint
Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, 1997.
description
xix, 234 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0804728577 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, 1997.
isbn
0804728577 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
1517471
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [203]-219) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
This book analyzes the emergence of ethnic consciousness among Hakka-speaking people in late imperial China in the context of their migrations in search of economic opportunities. It poses three central questions: What determined the temporal and geographic pattern of Hakka and Pengmin (a largely Hakka-speaking people) migration in this era? In what circumstances and over what issues did ethnic conflict emerge? How did the Chinese state react to the phenomena of migration and ethnic conflict? To answer these questions, a model is developed that brings together three ideas and types of data: the analytical concept of ethnicity; the history of internal migration in China; and the regional systems methodology of G. William Skinner, which has been both a breakthrough in the study of Chinese society and an approach of broad social-scientific application. Professor Skinner has also prepared eleven maps for the book, as well as the Introduction. The book is in two parts. Part I describes the spread of the Hakka throughout the Lingnan, and to a lesser extent the Southeast Coast, macroregions. It argues that this migration occurred because of upswings in the macroregional economies in the sixteenth century and in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. As long as economic opportunities were expanding, ethnic antagonisms were held in check. When, however, the macroregional economies declined, in the mid-seventeenth and late eighteenth centuries, ethnic tensions came to the fore, notably in the Hakka-Punti War of the mid-nineteenth century. Part II broadens the analysis to take into account other Hakka-speaking people, notably the Pengmin, or "shack people." When new economic opportunities opened up, the Pengmin moved to the peripheries of most of the macroregions along the Yangzi valley, particularly to the highland areas close to major trading centers. As with the Hakka, ethnic antagonisms, albeit differently expressed, emerged as a result of a declining economy and increased competition for limited resources in the main areas of Pengmin concentration.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1998-05-01:
Wright (Murdoch Univ., Australia) has thoughtfully edited the writings of his late colleague Sow-Theng Leong (1939-87). The study consists of two parts: the first deals with the Hakkas; the second concerns the Pengmin (shack-people, including but not limited to Hakkas). Based on copious research in gazetteers, government documents, and other sources, the work analyzes geographic and temporal patterns of migration, the formation of ethnic identity, interactions with local populations, government policies, and other topics. Rich in detail, it is informed by ethnographic theory and the regional systems methodology of G. William Skinner, whose brilliant introduction and careful maps enhance the study's value. Because it deals with major themes (and these minorities are major minorities!), the book will be widely consulted by students of traditional and modern China. Upper-division undergraduates and above. C. Schirokauer Columbia University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Overall, this is an excellent book... a very important reminder to specialists on ethnicity in China that it is not only state-recognized minority nationalities who are worthy of research."Asian Ethnicity
"Overall, this is an excellent book... a very important reminder to specialists on ethnicity in China that it is not only state-recognized minority nationalities who are worthy of research." Asian Ethnicity
"Overall, this is an excellent book... a very important reminder to specialists on ethnicity in China that it is not only state-recognized minority nationalities who are worthy of research."-- Asian Ethnicity
"A fascinating story of migration, ethnic warfare, economic expansion and disintegration, technological and agricultural innovation, and political response over the course of over 1,000 years of Chinese history. . . . This is the kind of work that makes one appreciate how truly illuminating a work of painstaking scholarship can be. Not only should this work be required reading for anyone in the China field, but, in addition, it provides a model for anyone interested in the historical emergence of ethnic identities in other parts of the world as well. " American Anthropologist
"A fascinating story of migration, ethnic warfare, economic expansion and disintegration, technological and agricultural innovation, and political response over the course of over 1,000 years of Chinese history. . . . This is the kind of work that makes one appreciate how truly illuminating a work of painstaking scholarship can be. Not only should this work be required reading for anyone in the China field, but, in addition, it provides a model for anyone interested in the historical emergence of ethnic identities in other parts of the world as well. " -- American Anthropologist
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 1998
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Summaries
Back Cover Copy
"A fascinating story of migration, ethnic warfare, economic expansion and disintegration, technological and agricultural innovation, and political response over the course of over 1,000 years of Chinese history. . . . This is the kind of work that makes one appreciate how truly illuminating a work of painstaking scholarship can be. Not only should this work be required reading for anyone in the China field, but, in addition, it provides a model for anyone interested in the historical emergence of ethnic identities in other parts of the world as well. " --American Anthropologist "Overall, this is an excellent book... a very important reminder to specialists on ethnicity in China that it is not only state-recognized minority nationalities who are worthy of research."-- Asian Ethnicity
Bowker Data Service Summary
This book analyses the emergence of ethnic consciousness among Hakka-speaking people in late imperial China in the context of their migration in search of economic opportunities.
Back Cover Copy
"A fascinating story of migration, ethnic warfare, economic expansion and disintegration, technological and agricultural innovation, and political response over the course of over 1,000 years of Chinese history. . . . This is the kind of work that makes one appreciate how truly illuminating a work of painstaking scholarship can be. Not only should this work be required reading for anyone in the China field, but, in addition, it provides a model for anyone interested in the historical emergence of ethnic identities in other parts of the world as well. " American Anthropologist "Overall, this is an excellent book... a very important reminder to specialists on ethnicity in China that it is not only state-recognized minority nationalities who are worthy of research." Asian Ethnicity
Table of Contents
A Note on Conventions in the Text, Tables, and Maps
Introductionp. 1
The Origins and Historiography of the Hakkasp. 19
Hakka Migrations in Lingnan and the Southeast Coastp. 39
The Formation of the Hakka Ethos in the Nineteenth Centuryp. 69
Ethnicity and Nationalism in the Twentieth Centuryp. 83
The Pengmin and Government Policies Toward Migrationp. 97
Pengmin Migration to the Gan Yangzi Regionp. 109
Ethnic Conflict in the Gan Yangzip. 129
Environmental Degradation: Tbe Pengmin in the Lower Yangzip. 147
Frontier Society: The Pengmin in the Hanshui Basinp. 163
Notesp. 181
Publications by Sow-Theng Leongp. 201
Bibliographyp. 203
Character Listp. 211
Indexp. 227
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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