Catalogue


Film, horror, and the body fantastic /
Linda Badley.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 1995.
description
199 p.
ISBN
0313275238 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 1995.
isbn
0313275238 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
1514235
 
Filmography: p. [187]-192.
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1996-04:
Badley (Middle Tennessee State Univ.) carefully looks at the anatomy and significance of horror and its impact on concepts of the self. She extends her study beyond horror films and literature to the broad cultural landscape that encompasses music, art, and even children's toys and cereals. The author uses the popular iconography of the monstrous and fantastic to suggest motifs or archetypes that relate the horror genre to a "body language." Her handling of popular culture is encyclopedic, even dense: her scholarly surgeries range from a postmodern deconstruction of Freud and his theories--with Thanatos as the contemporary cultural repressed--through a precise analysis of the spectatorship of the horror film (where she argues for the dominance of a male sadistic or female gothic gaze). Although Badley's treatment of the body is thorough and exhaustive, the many scholarly and cultural references become oppressive. Ironically, the work needs an embodiment of its own--the flesh with which each chapter begins, rather than the busy acknowledgment of every relevant source. The fascinating and frequently fresh cross-pollinations of concepts and media tend to exhaust the reader. Graduates; researchers. T. Lindvall; Regent University
Reviews
Review Quotes
'œ....Badley makes a good case for the confluence of contemporary horror films and contemporary theorists of the body....she establishes an interesting relationship between the represented body in contemporary horror films and contemporay theoretical discourses on the body...offers interesting readings...largely useful as a reference tool.'' Science-Fiction Studies
'œBadley carefully looks at the anatomy and significance of horror and its impact on concepts of the self. She extends her study beyond horror films and literature to the broad cultural landscape that encompasses music, art, and even childrens' toys and cereals...Her handling of popular culture is encyclopedic, even dense: her scholarly surgeries range from a postmodern deconstruction of Freud and his theories...through a precise analysis of the spectatorship of the horror film...'' Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 1996
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
This fascinating study relates horror film to recent interpretations of the body and the self, drawing from feminist film theory, psychoanalytic theory, cultural criticism and gender studies. Applying the term "horror" broadly, this work includes discussions of black comedy, thrillers, science fiction, and slasher films. Central to this book is the view of horror as a modern iconography and "discourse" of the body. Badley's thought-provoking analysis of films by directors Tim Burton, Tobe Hooper, George Romero, Ridley Scott, Brian De Palma, David Lynch, David Cronenberg, Jonathan Demme, and Clive Barker, will be of interest to both scholars and students.
Long Description
This fascinating study relates horror film to recent interpretations of the body and the self, drawing from feminist film theory, psychoanalytic theory, cultural criticism and gender studies. Applying the term horror broadly, this work includes discussions of black comedy, thrillers, science fiction, and slasher films. Central to this book is the view of horror as a modern iconography and discourse of the body. Badley's thought-provoking analysis of films by directors Tim Burton, Tobe Hooper, George Romero, Ridley Scott, Brian De Palma, David Lynch, David Cronenberg, Jonathan Demme, and Clive Barker, will be of interest to both scholars and students.
Table of Contents
Introduction
The Body Fantastic Spectral Effects: Postmodern Ghosts
Progeny Deconstructions of the Gaze
Anatomy Lessons Looking for the Mother in The Silence of the Lambs
Afterword
Notes
Bibliography
Filmography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem