Catalogue


Mr. Kaiser goes to Washington : the rise of a government entrepreneur /
Stephen B. Adams.
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c1997.
description
xii, 239 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0807823589 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c1997.
isbn
0807823589 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
1512890
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [219]-228) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1997-11-15:
In an expansion of his doctoral dissertation, Adams focuses on the relationship between the government and Henry Kaiser, noted shipbuilder during World War II. The government, wishing to open markets and increase production during the Great Depression, looked for businessmen willing to enter fields that needed large capital investments. Adams argues that Kaiser took advantage of the situation to become a government entrepreneur during the period. Kaiser would send proposals to key government people and secure loans and grants for entering those fields the government was interested in. This book discloses the fine line Kaiser walked to gain government support while maintaining the myth of the "self-made man." It would best serve as a text for academic collections exploring government and business relations. Recommended.‘Patricia Hatch, Inst. for Bus. & Home Safety, Boston (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Choice on 1998-02:
Kaiser embodied "the production miracle" during WW II. Relatively unknown outside the West before the war, he became the personification of the wartime industrial leader with his forays into steel, shipbuilding, aircraft, and magnesium. His success depended on cultivating government for contracts, loans, and relief from regulations. This book highlights the symbiotic relationship between the Roosevelt administration and Kaiser. Often the initiative came from government; the nation needed the additional capacity, but the firm given the contracts was the one that could meet Roosevelt's preferences for antimonopoly, good labor relations, and far western development. Kaiser succeeded in part because he had learned of these preferences during his New Deal public works contracting, but also because he had the best connected lawyer lobbyists in Washington. Adams amply demonstrates this by drawing upon the Kaiser papers, especially the correspondence between Tommy Corcoran and Henry Kaiser. A case study of government entrepreneurship, this fascinating book provides an excellent introduction to government-business relations at that point in time when the federal government became a major purchaser of goods and services. Amply footnoted, with bibliography and illustrations. All levels. D. Lindstrom; University of Wisconsin--Madison
Reviews
Review Quotes
[T]his fascinating book provides an excellent introduction to government-business relations [duing this period]. Choice
Adams's study is an exceptionally valuable addition to the history of American business and of the New Deal. Diana Davids Olien, University of Texas of the Permian Basin
[T]his fascinating book provides an excellent introduction to government-business relations [duing this period].Choice
[Adams] approaches Kaiser from a fresh angle.Technology & Culture
[Adams] approaches Kaiser from a fresh angle. Technology & Culture
Adams does an excellent job of recounting the history of Kaiser's economic rise.Naomi R. Lamoreaux, University of California, Los Angeles
Adams does an excellent job of recounting the history of Kaiser's economic rise. Naomi R. Lamoreaux, University of California, Los Angeles
Adams has written an important book. He probed in depth issues that others, myself included, passed over lightly.Journal of American History
Adams has written an important book. He probed in depth issues that others, myself included, passed over lightly. Journal of American History
Adams's study is an exceptionally valuable addition to the history of American business and of the New Deal.Diana Davids Olien, University of Texas of the Permian Basin
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, November 1997
Choice, February 1998
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
In this book, Stephen Adams offers Kaiser's story as the first detailed case study of "government entrepreneurship". The quintessential government entrepreneur, Kaiser built an empire in construction, shipbuilding, cement, magnesium, steel, and aluminum - all based on government contracts, government loans, and changes in government regulations. Exploring the symbiotic relationship forged between Roosevelt and Kaiser, Adams shows that while Kaiser capitalized on opportunities provided by the growth of the federal government, FDR found in Kaiser an industrial partner whose enterprises embodied his own political goals.
Main Description
In the 1940s, the name Henry J. Kaiser was magic. Based on the success of his shipyards, Kaiser was hailed by the national media as the force behind a 'can-do' production miracle and credited by the American public with doing more to help President Roosevelt win World War II than any other civilian. Kaiser also built an empire in construction, cement, magnesium, steel, and aluminum--all based on government contracts, government loans, and changes in government regulations. In this book, Stephen Adams offers Kaiser's story as the first detailed case study of 'government entrepreneurship.' Taking a fresh look at the birth of modern business-government relations, he explores the symbiotic connection forged between FDR and Kaiser. Adams shows that while Kaiser capitalized on opportunities provided by the growth of the federal government, FDR found in Kaiser an industrial partner whose enterprises embodied New Deal goals. The result of a confluence of administration policy and entrepreneurial zeal, Kaiser's dramatic rise illustrates the important role of governmental relations in American entrepreneurial success.
Main Description
In the 1940s, the name Henry J. Kaiser was magic. Based on the success of his shipyards, Kaiser was hailed by the national media as the force behind a 'can-do' production miracle and credited by the American public with doing more to help President Roosevelt win World War II than any other civilian. Kaiser also built an empire in construction, cement, magnesium, steel, and aluminum_all based on government contracts, government loans, and changes in government regulations. In this book, Stephen Adams offers Kaiser's story as the first detailed case study of 'government entrepreneurship.' Taking a fresh look at the birth of modern business-government relations, he explores the symbiotic connection forged between FDR and Kaiser. Adams shows that while Kaiser capitalized on opportunities provided by the growth of the federal government, FDR found in Kaiser an industrial partner whose enterprises embodied New Deal goals. The result of a confluence of administration policy and entrepreneurial zeal, Kaiser's dramatic rise illustrates the important role of governmental relations in American entrepreneurial success.
Long Description
In the 1940s, the name Henry J. Kaiser was magic. Based on the success of his shipyards, Kaiser was hailed by the national media as the force behind a 'can-do' production miracle and credited by the American public with doing more to help President Roosevelt win World War II than any other civilian. Kaiser also built an empire in construction, cement, magnesium, steel, and aluminum--all based on government contracts, government loans, and changes in government regulations.In this book, Stephen Adams offers Kaiser's story as the first detailed case study of 'government entrepreneurship.' Taking a fresh look at the birth of modern business-government relations, he explores the symbiotic connection forged between FDR and Kaiser. Adams shows that while Kaiser capitalized on opportunities provided by the growth of the federal government, FDR found in Kaiser an industrial partner whose enterprises embodied New Deal goals. The result of a confluence of administration policy and entrepreneurial zeal, Kaiser's dramatic rise illustrates the important role of governmental relations in American entrepreneurial success.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Abbreviations
Introduction to a Government Entrepreneur
The Education of Henry Kaiser
Government Entrepreneurship Comes of Age
A Rendezvous with Bureaucracy
Good Old American Know-Who
""Fabulous"" Kaiser
To Mars and Back
Send for Kaiser
Epilogue. A Reversal of Fortune
Conclusion
Notes
Bibliography
Index
A section of illustrations follows
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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