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Hayek on Hayek : an autobiographical dialogue /
F.A. Hayek ; edited by Stephen Kresge and Leif Wenar.
imprint
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, c1994.
description
xi, 170 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0226320626 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, c1994.
isbn
0226320626 (alk. paper)
general note
Supplement to: The collected works of F. A. Hayek. Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 1989-
catalogue key
1507696
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 157-159) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1994-05-01:
Economist, social and political theorist, and intellectual historian, Hayek has condemned state control of economies and societies throughout his 60-year career. Best known for his popular book, The Road to Serfdom (1945), which denounced central planning, Hayek was also a pioneer in monetary theory and a principal proponent of the libertarian philosophy. Ignored by many economists during the post- World War II era when Keynesianism was the dominant intellectual force, Hayek finally came into his own again in 1974 when he was awarded the Nobel Prize in economics. His life and views are depicted in a series of oral history interviews and in Hayek's own autobiographical notes. Recommended for large academic libraries.- Harry Frumerman, formerly with Hunter Coll., CUNY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Choice on 1994-11:
Nobelist F.A. von Hayek (d. 1992) became widely known for his The Road to Serfdom (1944) and for his vigorous opposition (over the middle decades of the century) to British economist J.M. Keynes. Both were unpopular at midcentury with most economists, more political scientists, and virtually all planners. Yet the deeper strata of Hayekean thought--in economics, psychology, and philosophy--went almost unnoticed and unappreciated. Widespread collapse of socialist economies (c. 1990)--which Hayek had argued a half-century earlier would be inevitable--recently brought popular attention to him once again. Still, the root elements of Hayekean thought remain overlooked by most. Hayek recognized and delineated conceptual constraints that flaw orthodox economic theory. And he mounted a fundamental (and successful) challenge to both psychological behaviorism and, in philosophy, logical positivism. Hayek on Hayek reveals the profoundness of Hayek's thought while providing a personal account of the human side of this outstanding intellectual. Kresge's brilliant introduction gives an excellent frame for the autobiographical dialogue that follows. Of modest size, this book is rich in content and will constitute a highly valuable addition to the holdings of any academic library. All levels. J. Murdock; emeritus, University of Missouri--Columbia
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 1994-03-28:
Champion of a free-market economy as a prerequisite to a free society, Friedrich August von Hayek (1899-1992) fought a losing battle against the centralizing policies of John Maynard Keynes. Nevertheless, the Vienna-born libertarian economist and political philosopher, who moved to London in 1931 and taught at the University of Chicago from 1950 to 1962, saw some of his ideas vindicated by the collapse of communism. Hayek's tough-minded approach to welfare reform and his belief that private enterprises should be allowed to compete with government make his views timely. In this feisty self-portrait, splicing autobiographical sketches and selected interviews, the 1974 Nobel Prize winner settles scores with Keynes and Harold Laski, discusses his affinity for his adopted country, Britain, and delves into monetary policy. Kresge is general editor of Hayek's collected works; Wenar is a Ph.D. candidate at Harvard. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews, March 1994
Publishers Weekly, March 1994
Library Journal, May 1994
Choice, November 1994
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The crumbling of the Berlin Wall, the fall of the iron curtain, and the Reagan and Thatcher "revolutions" all owe a tremendous debt to F. A. Hayek. Economist, social and political theorist, and intellectual historian, Hayek passionately championed individual liberty and condemned the dangers of state control. Now Hayek at last tells the story of his long and controversial career, during which his fortunes rose, fell, and finally rose again. Through a complete collection of previously unpublished autobiographical sketches and a wide selection of interviews, Hayek on Hayek provides the first detailed chronology of Hayek's early life and education, his intellectual progress, and the academic and public reception of his ideas. His discussions range from economic methodology and the question of religious faith to the atmosphere of post-World War I Vienna and the British character. Born in 1899 into a Viennese family of academics and civil servants, Hayek was educated at the University of Vienna, fought in the Great War, and later moved to London, where, as he watched liberty vanish under fascism and communism across Europe, he wrote The Road to Serfdom. Although this book attracted great public attention, Hayek was ignored by other economists for thirty years after World War II, when European social democracies boomed and Keynesianism became the dominant intellectual force. However, the award of the Nobel Prize in economics for 1974 signaled a reversal in Hayek's fortunes, and before his death in 1992 he saw his life's work vindicated in the collapse of the planned economies of Eastern Europe. Hayek on Hayek is as close to an autobiography of Hayek as we will ever have. In his own eloquent words, Hayek reveals the remarkable life of a revolutionary thinker in revolutionary times. "One of the great thinkers of our age who explored the promise and contours of liberty....[Hayek] revolutionized the world's intellectual and political life"--President George Bush, on awarding F. A. Hayek the Medal of Freedom F. A. Hayek, recipient of the Medal of Freedom 1991 and the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics in 1974, was a pioneer in monetary theory and the principal proponent of the libertarian philosophy. Hayek is the author of numerous books in economics, as well as books in political philosophy and psychology.
Main Description
The crumbling of the Berlin Wall, the fall of the iron curtain, and the Reagan and Thatcher "revolutions" all owe a tremendous debt to F. A. Hayek. Economist, social and political theorist, and intellectual historian, Hayek passionately championed individual liberty and condemned the dangers of state control. Now Hayek at last tells the story of his long and controversial career, during which his fortunes rose, fell, and finally rose again. Through a complete collection of previously unpublished autobiographical sketches and a wide selection of interviews, Hayek on Hayek provides the first detailed chronology of Hayek's early life and education, his intellectual progress, and the academic and public reception of his ideas. His discussions range from economic methodology and the question of religious faith to the atmosphere of post-World War I Vienna and the British character. Born in 1899 into a Viennese family of academics and civil servants, Hayek was educated at the University of Vienna, fought in the Great War, and later moved to London, where, as he watched liberty vanish under fascism and communism across Europe, he wrote The Road to Serfdom. Although this book attracted great public attention, Hayek was ignored by other economists for thirty years after World War II, when European social democracies boomed and Keynesianism became the dominant intellectual force. However, the award of the Nobel Prize in economics for 1974 signaled a reversal in Hayek's fortunes, and before his death in 1992 he saw his life's work vindicated in the collapse of the planned economies of Eastern Europe. Hayek on Hayek is as close to an autobiography of Hayek as we will ever have. In his own eloquent words, Hayek reveals the remarkable life of a revolutionary thinker in revolutionary times. "One of the great thinkers of our age who explored the promise and contours of liberty....[Hayek] revolutionized the world's intellectual and political life"President George Bush, on awarding F. A. Hayek the Medal of Freedom F. A. Hayek, recipient of the Medal of Freedom 1991 and the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics in 1974, was a pioneer in monetary theory and the principal proponent of the libertarian philosophy. Hayek is the author of numerous books in economics, as well as books in political philosophy and psychology.
Table of Contents
Editorial
Foreword
Introduction
Vienna-New York-Vienna
London
A Parting in the Road
Chicago-Freiburg Publications and Letters Mentioned in Text
Index of Persons and Places
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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