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British foreign policy in the age of the American Revolution /
H.M. Scott.
imprint
Oxford [England] : Clarendon Press ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1990.
description
xiii, 377 p.
ISBN
0198201958 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford [England] : Clarendon Press ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1990.
isbn
0198201958 :
catalogue key
1504728
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1991-07:
Scott's book covers what was until recently a neglected topic. As Scott (University of St. Andrews) points out, the historians' neglect echoes the weakness of British foreign policy during much of the American Revolutionary period. Britain's triumph in the Seven Years War was vitiated by shifting diplomatic patterns in the postwar period. France's decline and the emergence of Prussia and Russia as great powers undermined British ability to secure continental allies. Naval strength mitigated but did not compensate for Britain's isolation. Lethargy and divisiveness in policy-making added to Britain's problem, but were marginal to them. Despite renewed diplomatic vigor in the 1770s, Britain faced its enemies alone. Scott draws extensively on European archives, and one of the book's strengths is that it roots British policy in the context of European geopolitics. The richness of detail in this excellent work never obscures its significant themes. Footnotes; good bibliography. Upper-division undergraduates and above. -J. Sainsbury, Brock University
Reviews
Review Quotes
'a sober, scholarly and fair-minded account of British foreign policy in this period'John Cannon, University of Newcastle Upon Tyne, Albion
'based on impressive archival research in both British and foreign repositories and on an extensive grasp of printed primary material ... This book will be required reading for all those interested in 18th-century British foreign policy for many years.'Times Higher Education Supplement
'Dr Scott has produced a well-written, and refreshing objective account of British policy-making, which casts much interesting new light on the thought processes of its leaders, and pays due attention to the influence of domestic policy and the pressure of public opinion.'Isabel de Madariaga, British Journal of Eighteenth Century Studies, Spring 1993
'solid and worthy study ... This book will be required reading for all those interested in eighteenth-century British foreign policy for many years.'Jeremy Black, University of Durham, History, June 1992
'This excellent book fills a major gap in the historiography of eighteenth-century Britain.'History Today
"This is a valuable addition to scholarship."--Journal of Modern History "A work that should stand the test of time even as it inspires other scholars to challenge some of his findings....a valuable addition to scholarship, particularly for the years 1763-73."--Journal of Modern History "Will long be used as a key reference to the complexities and subtleties of British diplomacy in the critical middle years of George III's reign."--American Historical Review "[A] splendid book....So provocative and well written as to be one of the most exciting works of history I have read in a long time....American colonial, military, and political historians will find much to ponder and all lovers of good historical writing much to enjoy."--William and Mary Quarterly "This work is a masterful analysis of British diplomacy during the last half of the eighteenth century and undoubtedly will be recognized as the authoritative study in the field."--Pennsylvania History
"This is a valuable addition to scholarship."-- Journal of Modern History "A work that should stand the test of time even as it inspires other scholars to challenge some of his findings....a valuable addition to scholarship, particularly for the years 1763-73."-- Journal of Modern History "Will long be used as a key reference to the complexities and subtleties of British diplomacy in the critical middle years of George III's reign."-- American Historical Review "[A] splendid book....So provocative and well written as to be one of the most exciting works of history I have read in a long time....American colonial, military, and political historians will find much to ponder and all lovers of good historical writing much to enjoy."-- William and Mary Quarterly "This work is a masterful analysis of British diplomacy during the last half of the eighteenth century and undoubtedly will be recognized as the authoritative study in the field."-- Pennsylvania History
"This is a valuable addition to scholarship."--Journal of Modern History "A work that should stand the test of time even as it inspires other scholars to challenge some of his findings....a valuable addition to scholarship, particularly for the years 1763-73."--Journal of Modern History "Will long be used as a key reference to the complexities and subtleties of British diplomacy in the critical middle years of George III's reign."--American Historical Review "[A] splendid book....So provocative and well written as to be one of the most exciting works of history I have read in a long time....American colonial, military, and political historians will find much to ponder and all lovers of good historical writing much to enjoy."--William and MaryQuarterly "This work is a masterful analysis of British diplomacy during the last half of the eighteenth century and undoubtedly will be recognized as the authoritative study in the field."--Pennsylvania History
'This volume will long be used as a key reference to the complexities and subtleties of British diplomacy in the critical middle years of George III's reign.'Charles R. Middleton, University of Colorado, American Historical Review, June 1992
'With this splendid book, H.M. Scott joins one of the great traditions in historical scholarship, the study of eighteenth-century British diplomacy. Scott's topic is huge ... His range of sources is correspondingly wide ... It is impressive that he is able to compress his results into fewerthan 350 pages of text. Scott's thesis is convincingly argued, and his judgment about both eighteenth-century diplomats and twentieth-century historians usually is superb. American colonial, military, and political historians will find much to ponder and all lovers of good historical writing much toenjoy.'Jonathan R. Dull, William and Mary Quarterly
'based on impressive archival research in both British and foreign repositories and on an extensive grasp of printed primary material ... This book will be required reading for all those interested in 18th-century British foreign policy for many years.'Times Higher Education Supplement'This excellent book fills a major gap in the historiography of eighteenth-century Britain.'History Today'With this splendid book, H.M. Scott joins one of the great traditions in historical scholarship, the study of eighteenth-century British diplomacy. Scott's topic is huge ... His range of sources is correspondingly wide ... It is impressive that he is able to compress his results into fewer than 350 pages of text. Scott's thesis is convincingly argued, and his judgment about both eighteenth-century diplomats and twentieth-century historians usually issuperb. American colonial, military, and political historians will find much to ponder and all lovers of good historical writing much to enjoy.'Jonathan R. Dull, William and Mary Quarterly'solid and worthy study ... This book will be required reading for all those interested in eighteenth-century British foreign policy for many years.'Jeremy Black, University of Durham, History, June 1992'This volume will long be used as a key reference to the complexities and subtleties of British diplomacy in the critical middle years of George III's reign.'Charles R. Middleton, University of Colorado, American Historical Review, June 1992'Dr Scott has produced a well-written, and refreshing objective account of British policy-making, which casts much interesting new light on the thought processes of its leaders, and pays due attention to the influence of domestic policy and the pressure of public opinion.'Isabel de Madariaga, British Journal of Eighteenth Century Studies, Spring 1993'a sober, scholarly and fair-minded account of British foreign policy in this period'John Cannon, University of Newcastle Upon Tyne, Albion
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 1991
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
This is the first detailed and comprehensive study of British foreign policy before and during the war which led to the loss of the American colonies, a period from 1756 to 1783 in which Britain's position in Europe was transformed. H. M. Scott examines the nature and the role of British diplomacy in the age of the American Revolution in the context of Britain's other eighteenth-century conflicts. Two themes receive particular attention: Britain's continuing rivalry with the Bourbons, exemplified by the great crisis over the Falkland Islands in 1770-1, and the unsuccessful efforts to strengthen Britain diplomatically by concluding alliances with major Continental powers. Dr Scott has provided a major scholarly reassessment of British diplomacy in this period, analysing both the impact of the personalities involved, and the successes and failures of their policies.
Long Description
This is the first detailed and comprehensive study of the British foreign policy before and during the war that led to the loss of the American colonies. Using a wide range of sources, Scott examines the problems faced by Britain after the Seven Years War and the way in which they were exacerbated during the mid-1760s by its British statesmen. He proceeds to chart the limited recovery started later in the decade, the renewed setbacks following the American revolt in 1775, and the subsequent intervention of France and Spain. The resulting isolation is shown to have been the result of a realignment of the European powers which undermined many of the traditional premises of British diplomacy. A scholarly reassessment of British diplomacy, this volume analyzes both the impact of the personalities involved and the successes and failures of their policies.
Main Description
The first detailed and comprehensive study of British foreign policy the the age of the American Revolution in the context of Britain's other eighteenth-century conflicts, including the continuing rivalry with the Bourbons.
Main Description
This is the first detailed and comprehensive study of British foreign policy before and during the war which led to the loss of the American colonies, a period from 1756 to 1783 in which Britain's position in Europe was transformed. H. M. Scott examines the nature and the role of Britishdiplomacy in the age of the American Revolution in the context of Britain's other eighteenth-century conflicts. Two themes receive particular attention: Britain's continuing rivalry with the Bourbons, exemplified by the great crisis over the Falkland Islands in 1770-1, and the unsuccessful efforts to strengthen Britain diplomatically by concluding alliances with major Continental powers. Dr Scott hasprovided a major scholarly reassessment of British diplomacy in this period, analysing both the impact of the personalities involved, and the successes and failures of their policies.
Table of Contents
Abbreviations; A note on dates
The study of British foreign policy in the age of the American revolution
The making of British foreign policy
The legacies of the Seven Years War
The failure of the old system 1763-1765
The decline of British diplomacy 1765-1768
The beginnings of recovery 1768-1771
The ascendancy of the Eastern powers 1771-1773
Splendid isolation 1773-1775
Peace with the Bourbons 1777-1779
War in Europe 1778-1780
The coming of peace 1781-1783
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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