Catalogue


Crafting a class : college admissions and financial aid, 1955-1994 /
Elizabeth A. Duffy and Idana Goldberg.
imprint
Princeton : Princeton University Press, c1997.
description
xxi, 296 p. : ill.
ISBN
0691016836 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Princeton : Princeton University Press, c1997.
isbn
0691016836 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
1501188
 
Includes bibliographical references ([277]-285) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1998-04-01:
Duffy and Goldberg (Mellon Foundation) study the experiences of 16 liberal arts colleges in two states--Massachusetts and Ohio--in recruiting, admitting, and enrolling successive cohorts of students. They begin their study at "a point in time after the temporary bulge in applicants from the GI Bill but before the prolonged enrollment surge in the early 1960s," a period that set the standards for admissions and financial aid since. Part 1 studies trends in enrollment and admissions: when and why institutions expanded their enrollments; changed policies and purposes of admissions; the quality of matriculated students. Part 2 examines the colleges' responses to the Civil Rights Movement and the women's movement (the push to coeducation and recruitment and enrollment of minority students). Part 3 looks at patterns of financial aid. This is not simply a statistical compendium; the data indicate questions to be asked to explain empirical phenomena, all placed in a multidimensional context of national developments. This is especially evident in the investigation of the Civil Rights Movement and the analysis of how the colleges' commitments to increased access and diversity differ in the 1990s from policies of the 1960s and '70s. The authors note the "strongest lesson": "institutional actions matter" because, external forces aside, they influence "an institution's ability to craft a class." This important study complements David Breneman's Liberal Arts Colleges (CH, Nov'94). Invaluable to graduate students and researchers. F. Cordasco emeritus, Montclair State University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 1998
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
An excellent, interesting, well-written book.... It is a significant contribution to the history of higher education, and in particular, to the history of liberal arts colleges.DLDavid W. Breneman, University of Virginia Admissions and financial aid policies at liberal arts colleges have changed dramatically since 1955. Through the 1950s, most colleges in the United States enrolled fewer than 1000 students, nearly all of whom were white. Few colleges were truly selective in their admissions; they accepted most students who applied. In the 1960s, as the children of the baby boom reached college age and both federal and institutional financial aid programs expanded, many more students began to apply to college. For the first time, liberal arts colleges were faced with an abundance of applicants, which raised new questions. What criteria would they use to select students? How would they award financial aid? The answers to these questions were shaped by financial and educational considerations as well as by the struggles for civil rights and gender equality that swept across the nation. The colleges' answers also proved crucial to their futures, as the years since the mid-1970s have shown. When the influx of baby boom students slowed, colleges began to recruit aggressively in order to maintain their class sizes. In the past decade, financial aid has become another tool that colleges use to compete for the best students. By tracing the development of competitive admission and financial aid policies at a selected group of liberal arts colleges, Crafting a Class explores how institutional decisions reflect and respond to broad demographic, economic, political, and social forces. Elizabeth Duffy and Idana Goldberg closely studied sixteen liberal arts colleges in Massachusetts and Ohio. At each college, they not only collected empirical data on admissions, enrollment, and financial aid trends, but they also examined archival materials and interviewed current and former administrators. Duffy and Goldberg have produced an authoritative and highly readable account of some of the most important changes that have taken place in American higher education during the tumultuous decades since the mid-1950s. Crafting a Class will interest all readers who are concerned with the past and future directions of higher education in the United States.
Unpaid Annotation
Admissions and financial aid policies at liberal arts colleges have changed dramatically since 1955. Through the 1950s, most colleges in the United States enrolled fewer than 1000 students, nearly all of whom were white. Few colleges were truly selective in their admissions; they accepted most students who applied. In the 1960s, as the children of the baby boom reached college age and both federal and institutional financial aid programs expanded, many more students began to apply to college. For the first time, liberal arts colleges were faced with an abundance of applicants, which raised new questions. What criteria would they use to select students? How would they award financial aid? The answers to these questions were shaped by financial and educational considerations as well as by the struggles for civil rights and gender equality that swept across the nation. The colleges' answers also proved crucial to their futures, as the years since the mid-1970s have shown. When the influx of baby boom students slowed, colleges began to recruit aggressively in order to maintain their class sizes. In the past decade, financial aid has becom
Table of Contents
List of Figures and Tables
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments
Enrollment, Admissions, and Qualityp. 1
Enrollment Pressures: Ebbs and Flowsp. 3
The Admissions Processp. 34
Student Qualityp. 76
Responses to Social Forcesp. 103
The Coeducation Movementp. 105
Minority Recruitmentp. 137
The Evolution of Financial Aidp. 167
The Development of Need-Based Aidp. 169
The Growth of Merit Aidp. 205
Conclusionp. 228
Notesp. 233
Survey Formsp. 267
Interviewsp. 273
Bibliographyp. 277
Indexp. 286
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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