Catalogue


Warriors into traders : the power of the market in early Greece /
David W. Tandy.
imprint
Berkeley, CA. : University of California Press, c1997.
description
xv, 296 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520202694 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley, CA. : University of California Press, c1997.
isbn
0520202694 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
1500885
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 235-279) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
David W. Tandy is Distinguished Professor of Humanities in the departments of Classics and anthropology at the University of Tennessee.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1998-04-01:
A few years ago Tandy discovered the work of the economic historian Karl Polanyi. Exposure to this powerful intellectual virus seems to have hit him as hard as measles struck when first introduced among the Fiji islanders. The historical developments he investigates in Warriors into Traders are familiar to all ancient historians: the increase in population, trade (maritime trade in particular), and Mediterranean colonization that heralded the emergence into daylight of the Greek city-state (polis) at the close of the Dark Age (c. 800 BCE). What is new is Tandy's interpretation. Those scholars who saw this institution slowly evolving in local communities, where warriors on a limestone acropolis protected the outlying peasantry in return for maintenance, will be brought up short to learn that "the polis came into existence when a newly institutionalized political and economic center undertook to exclude the peripheral members of the community from the economic mainstream." Tandy could have shed light on kingship and tribal development; instead he applies Roussel's and Bourriot's antitribal theories positing evolution from "egalitarian" through "stratified" societies to the (nonkinship-based) state. Fascinating for experts; beginners stay clear. P. M. Green University of Iowa
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 1998
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
The eighth century dawned on a Greek world that had remained substantially unchanged during the centuries of stagnation known as the Dark Age. This book is a study of the economic and cultural upheaval that shook mainland Greece and the Aegean area in the eighth century, and the role that poetry played in this upheaval. Using tools from political and economic anthropology, David Tandy argues that between about 800 and 700 B.C., a great transformation of dominant economic institutions took place involving wrenching adjustments in the way status and wealth were distributed within the Greek communities.Tandy explores the economic organization of preindustrial societies, both ancient and contemporary, to shed light on the Greek experience. He argues that the sudden shift in Greek economic formations led to new social behaviors and to new social structures such as the "polis, itself a by-product of economic change. Unraveling the dialectic between the material record and epic poetry, Tandy showsthat the epic tradition mirrored these new social behaviors and that it portrayed the stresses that economic change brought to the ancient Aegean world.Tandy brings in comparative evidence from other small-scale communities beset by changes, spotlighting the specific plight of one community, Ascra in Boeotia, on whose behalf Hesiod sang his "Works and Days. The result is a lively, moving account of a human dilemma that, many centuries later, is all too familiar.
Main Description
The eighth century dawned on a Greek world that had remained substantially unchanged during the centuries of stagnation known as the Dark Age. This book is a study of the economic and cultural upheaval that shook mainland Greece and the Aegean area in the eighth century, and the role that poetry played in this upheaval. Using tools from political and economic anthropology, David Tandy argues that between about 800 and 700 B.C., a great transformation of dominant economic institutions took place involving wrenching adjustments in the way status and wealth were distributed within the Greek communities. Tandy explores the economic organization of preindustrial societies, both ancient and contemporary, to shed light on the Greek experience. He argues that the sudden shift in Greek economic formations led to new social behaviors and to new social structures such as the polis, itself a by-product of economic change. Unraveling the dialectic between the material record and epic poetry, Tandy shows that the epic tradition mirrored these new social behaviors and that it portrayed the stresses that economic change brought to the ancient Aegean world. Tandy brings in comparative evidence from other small-scale communities beset by changes, spotlighting the specific plight of one community, Ascra in Boeotia, on whose behalf Hesiod sang his Works and Days. The result is a lively, moving account of a human dilemma that, many centuries later, is all too familiar.
Long Description
The eighth century dawned on a Greek world that had remained substantially unchanged during the centuries of stagnation known as the Dark Age. This book is a study of the economic and cultural upheaval that shook mainland Greece and the Aegean area in the eighth century, and the role that poetry played in this upheaval. Using tools from political and economic anthropology, David Tandy argues that between about 800 and 700 B.C., a great transformation of dominant economic institutions took place involving wrenching adjustments in the way status and wealth were distributed within the Greek communities. Tandy explores the economic organization of preindustrial societies, both ancient and contemporary, to shed light on the Greek experience. He argues that the sudden shift in Greek economic formations led to new social behaviors and to new social structures such as thepolis, itself a by-product of economic change. Unraveling the dialectic between the material record and epic poetry, Tandy shows that the epic tradition mirrored these new social behaviors and that it portrayed the stresses that economic change brought to the ancient Aegean world. Tandy brings in comparative evidence from other small-scale communities beset by changes, spotlighting the specific plight of one community, Ascra in Boeotia, on whose behalf Hesiod sang hisWorks and Days. The result is a lively, moving account of a human dilemma that, many centuries later, is all too familiar.
Table of Contents
Tables
Datable burials in Athens, Attica, and the Argolidp. 47
Annual increase in burials in Athens, Attica, and the Argolidp. 48
Datable burials in the Argolidp. 50
Annual increase in burials in the Argolidp. 50
Burials in Athens and Attica, by agep. 51
Deaths in Athens and Atticap. 52
Annual increase in deaths in Athens and Atticap. 52
Offerings to Zeus Ombrios on Mt. Hymettusp. 54
Offerings to Zeus Ombrios, by vessel typep. 54
Population growth in North Americap. 56
Population growth in select regions of the worldp. 57
Greek colonies in the westp. 77
Figures
Renfrew's growth modelp. 34
Burials per annum in Athens, Attica, and the Argolidp. 49
Burials in Athensp. 53
The symmetry of reciprocityp. 95
External reciprocity between "nations"p. 97
The centricity of redistributionp. 102
The centricity and simplicity of householdingp. 105
Introduction of marketsp. 115
Simultaneous reciprocity, redistribution, and marketsp. 117
Limited market systemp. 126
Zagora on Androsp. 146
Emporio on Chiosp. 147
Koukounaries on Parosp. 148
Maps
Greece and the Aegeanp. 3
The Greeks in the westp. 60
The eastern Mediterraneanp. 61
Boeotiap. 204
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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