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Wordsworth and the geologists /
John Wyatt.
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1995.
description
xiv, 268 p. : ill.
ISBN
0521472598
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1995.
isbn
0521472598
catalogue key
1482255
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 251-264) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'... an absorbing and important book.' Stephen Gill, Romanticism
'... an absorbing and important book.'Stephen Gill, Romanticism
‘… an absorbing and important book.’Stephen Gill, Romanticism
"This is a straightforward historical study....Wyatt's research is unimpeded by abstract theoretical claims....is a significant contribution to our knowledge of the complex links between poetic and scientific thought in the first half of the nineteenth century in England." Albion
"Wyatt has mastered and presented a broad array of scholarship about Romantic literature, Wordsworth, theology, geology, and natural science in a critical, thoughtful, and scholarly, but readable manner." Thomas McGeary, Journal of Geoscience Education
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In this book John Wyatt explores the unexpectedly close relationship between a major Romanitc poet and a group of scientists inthe formative years of a new discipline, geology.
Description for Bookstore
In this 1995 book, John Wyatt explores the relationship between literary history and science, through study of the friendship between Wordsworth and a group of scientists in the formative years of the new science of geology, and challenges the simplistic opposition between Romantic-literary and scientific-materialist cultures.
Description for Bookstore
John Wyatt explores the relationship between literary history and science, through study of the friendship between Wordsworth and a group of scientists in the formative years of the new science of geology, and challenges the simplistic opposition between Romantic-literary and scientific-materialist cultures.
Description for Library
Examination of the links between literary history and science provides valuable new insights for scholars across a range of disciplines. John Wyatt explores the unexpectedly close relationship between William Wordsworth and a group of scientists in the formative years of the new science of geology. Wyatt's study of this personal and intellectual friendship challenges the simplistic opposition between Romantic-literary and scientific-materialist cultures, and shows how discourses were affected by the network of influences between poetry and geology.
Main Description
Examination of the links between science and literary history is providing new insight for scholars across a range of disciplines. In Wordsworth and the Geologists, first published in 1995, John Wyatt explores the relationship between a major Romantic poet and a group of scientists in the formative years of a new discipline, geology. Wordsworth's later poems and prose display unexpected knowledge of contemporary geology and a preoccupation with many of the philosophical issues concerned with the developing science of geology. Letters and diaries of a group of leading geologists reveal that they knew Wordsworth, and discussed their subject with him. Wyatt shows how the implications of such discussions challenge the simplistic version of 'two cultures', the Romantic-literary against the scientific-materialistic; and he reminds us of the variety of interrelating discourses current between 1807 (the year of the foundation of the Geological Society of London) and 1850 (the year of Wordsworth's death).
Main Description
Examination of the links between science and literary history is providing new insight for scholars across a range of disciplines. In Wordsworth and the Geologists John Wyatt explores the hitherto unexamined relationship between a major Romantic poet and a group of scientists in the formative years of a new discipline, geology. Wordsworth's later poems and prose display unexpected knowledge of contemporary geology and a preoccupation with many of the philosophical issues concerned with the developing science of geology. Letters and diaries of a group of leading geologists reveal that they knew Wordsworth, and discussed their subject with him. Wyatt shows how the implications of such discussions challenge the simplistic version of 'two cultures', the Romantic-literary against the scientific-materialistic; and he reminds us of the variety of interrelating discourses current between 1807 (the year of the foundation of the Geological Society of London) and 1850 (the year of Wordsworth's death).
Table of Contents
Introduction
Wordsworth-s geology: references and allusions
-Pronounce their benediction; speak of them as powers-: the wider context of geological information
Trinity men
Order, clarity, distinctness
-The universality of nature-s kingdom-?
Duration and decay: the abyss of time
Geology: the poetic discipline
Geologists and humanity
Conclusion
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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