Catalogue


The foreign policy of Pakistan : ethnic impacts on diplomacy, 1971-1994 /
Mehtab Ali Shah.
imprint
London ; New York : I.B. Tauris ; New York : Distributed in the United States and Canada by St. Martin's Press, 1997.
description
xx, 267 p. : map ; 22 cm.
ISBN
1860641695
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
London ; New York : I.B. Tauris ; New York : Distributed in the United States and Canada by St. Martin's Press, 1997.
isbn
1860641695
catalogue key
1469842
 
Includes bibliographical references ( p. [235]-251) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1998-05-01:
The foreign policy of Pakistan since 1971, insists Mehtab Ali Shah (Univ. of Sindh, Pakistan), has failed to reflect a national consensus. Each of Pakistan's ethnic groups has a different perception of the country's security based on its geostrategic location and level of participation in decision making. Official policy, however, does not reflect this diversity because decision making is dominated by a Punjabi, Pashtun, and Urdu speaking elite that excludes the views of Sindhi, Baloch, and Siraiki elites. In contrast to official policy, Shah insists, minority elites support self-determination for Kashmir, closer trade ties with India, and a nonnuclear Pakistan. These minority elites also oppose interference in Afghanistan, disapprove of links to the Middle East, are suspicious of ties to Central Asia, and oppose close relations with the US. The author believes that a national consensus requires greater power sharing. Despite Shah's critique, however, he appears to be uncertain whether greater inclusion of ethnic minorities in decision making would result in reform or acceptance of the country's foreign policy. The book will be of interest to graduate students and scholars of foreign policy, ethnic politics, and Pakistan. S. A. Kochanek Pennsylvania State University, University Park Campus
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This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 1998
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Shah argues that Pakistan's foreign policy is formulated and driven largely by domestic policies, especially ethnicity, and shows how the ethnicity of the various policy-making elites affects issues such as the relationship with India.
Main Description
Arguing that Pakistan's foreign policy is formulated and driven largely by domestic policies, and especially by ethnicity, this work looks at the multi-ethnic and multilingual structure of Pakistan and at the four main provinces - Sindh, Baluchistan, Punjab and the North-West Frontier Province. The author sets out to show how powerful cross-border relationships and distinct historical, linguistic, cultural and family links determine the way in the which the country's ethnic groups see their region and the world at large. He believes that it is the ethnicity of the various policy-making elites which affects the principal issues in Pakistani foreign policy - the relationship with India, nuclear policy, and Kashmir as a flashpoint in Indo-Pakistan relationships, as well as relationships with Islamic states and with the USA, Russia, China and other powers.
Table of Contents
Abbreviations and Acronyms
Glossary
Map of Pakistan
Some Significant Dates
Acknowledgements
Introductionp. 1
Pakistan's Changing Geopolitical Situation Between 1971 and 1994
Conceptual Frameworkp. 8
Overview: 1947-94p. 9
Changes around Pakistan since 1971p. 15
The Indian Dimensionp. 15
Pakistan and the Gulf Regionp. 26
Pakistan and the Central Asian Knotp. 33
Pakistan's Geopolitical Situation in the 1990sp. 36
Sindh
Location and Geopolitical Featuresp. 42
Demographic Features and the Sindhi Ethosp. 45
Why and How Sindhis Joined the Union of Pakistanp. 47
Experience of the Union of Pakistanp. 50
Perceptions of the State, Security and Foreign Policyp. 60
Foreign Policy Perceptions and Influence on Policyp. 64
Foreign Policy Preferencesp. 82
Balochistan
Location and Geopolitical Featuresp. 89
Demographic Features and the Baloch Ethosp. 91
Why and How Balochs Joined the Union of Pakistanp. 93
Experience of the Union of Pakistanp. 95
Perceptions of the State, Security and Foreign Policyp. 103
Foreign Policy Perceptions and Influence on Policyp. 105
Foreign Policy Preferencesp. 117
Punjab
Location and Geopolitical Featuresp. 121
Demographic Features and the Punjabi Ethosp. 123
Why and How Punjabis Joined the Union of Pakistanp. 129
Experience of the Union of Pakistanp. 132
Perceptions of the State, Security and Foreign Policyp. 140
Foreign Policy Perceptions and Influence on Policyp. 142
Foreign Policy Preferencesp. 157
North-West Frontier Province (NWFP)
Location and Geopolitical Featuresp. 159
Demographic Features and the Pashtun Ethosp. 162
Why and How Pashtuns Joined the Union of Pakistanp. 165
Experience of the Union of Pakistanp. 168
Perceptions of the State, Security and Foreign Policyp. 175
Foreign Policy Perceptions and Influence on Policyp. 178
Foreign Policy Preferencesp. 195
Conclusionp. 197
Epilogue: Ethnicity and Foreign Policy in the Late 1990sp. 212
Ethnic Origins of Federal Government Functionariesp. 219
Ethnic Origins of Senior Diplomats Posted Abroadp. 222
Ethnic Origins of Functionaries of the Province of Sindhp. 227
Ethnic Origins of Functionaries of the Province of Balochistanp. 229
Ethnic Origins of Functionaries of the Province of Punjabp. 231
Ethnic Origins of Functionaries of the North West Frontier Provincep. 233
Selected Bibliographyp. 235
Indexp. 253
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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