Catalogue


A people's history of the United States : 1492-present /
Howard Zinn.
edition
Rev. and updated ed.
imprint
New York : HarperPerennial, 1995.
description
675 p. ; 21 cm.
ISBN
0060926430
format(s)
Book
Holdings
Subjects
More Details
imprint
New York : HarperPerennial, 1995.
isbn
0060926430
general note
"First HarperPerennial edition"--T.p. verso.
catalogue key
1468175
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [635]-653) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Howard Zinn is a historian, playwright, and social activist. He was a shipyard worker and Air Force bombardier before he went to college under the GI Bill and received his Ph.D. from Columbia University. He has taught at Spelman College and Boston University, and has been a visiting professor at the University of Paris and the University of Bologna. He has received the Thomas Merton Award, the Eugene V. Debs Award, the Upton Sinclair Award, and the Lannan Literary Award. He lives in Auburndale, Massachusetts.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2003-02-15:
According to this classic of revisionist American history, narratives of national unity and progress are a smoke screen disguising the ceaseless conflict between elites and the masses whom they oppress and exploit. Historian Zinn sides with the latter group in chronicling Indians' struggle against Europeans, blacks' struggle against racism, women's struggle against patriarchy, and workers' struggle against capitalists. First published in 1980, the volume sums up decades of post-war scholarship into a definitive statement of leftist, multicultural, anti-imperialist historiography. This edition updates that project with new chapters on the Clinton and Bush presidencies, which deplore Clinton's pro-business agenda, celebrate the 1999 Seattle anti-globalization protests and apologize for previous editions' slighting of the struggles of Latinos and gays. Zinn's work is an vital corrective to triumphalist accounts, but his uncompromising radicalism shades, at times, into cynicism. Zinn views the Bill of Rights, universal suffrage, affirmative action and collective bargaining not as fundamental (albeit imperfect) extensions of freedom, but as tactical concessions by monied elites to defuse and contain more revolutionary impulses; voting, in fact, is but the most insidious of the "controls." It's too bad that Zinn dismisses two centuries of talk about "patriotism, democracy, national interest" as mere "slogans" and "pretense," because the history he recounts is in large part the effort of downtrodden people to claim these ideals for their own. (Feb. 16) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Washington Post, November 2011
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Summaries
Main Description
Since its original landmark publication in 1980, A People's History of the United States has been chronicling American history from the bottom up, throwing out the official version of history taught in schools -- with its emphasis on great men in high places -- to focus on the street, the home, and the, workplace. Known for its lively, clear prose as well as its scholarly research, A People's History is the only volume to tell America's story from the point of view of -- and in the words of -- America's women, factory workers, African-Americans, Native Americans, the working poor, and immigrant laborers. As historian Howard Zinn shows, many of our country's greatest battles -- the fights for a fair wage, an eight-hour workday, child-labor laws, health and safety standards, universal suffrage, women's rights, racial equality -- were carried out at the grassroots level, against bloody resistance. Covering Christopher Columbus's arrival through President Clinton's first term, A People's History of the United States, which was nominated for the American Book Award in 1981, features insightful analysis of the most important events in our history. Revised, updated, and featuring a new after, word by the author, this special twentieth anniversary edition continues Zinn's important contribution to a complete and balanced understanding of American history.
Table of Contents
Columbus, the Indians, and Human Progress
Drawing the Color Line
Persons of Mean and Vile Condition
Tyranny is Tyranny
A Kind of Revolution
The Intimately Oppressed
As Long as Grass Grows or Water Runs
We Take Nothing by Conquest, Thank God
Slavery Without Submission, Emancipation Without Freedom
The Other Civil War
Robber Barons and Rebels
The Empire and the People
The Socialist Challenge
War is the Health of the State
Self-help in Hard Times
A People's War?
"Or Does It Explode?"
The Impossible Victory: Vietnam
Surprises
The Seventies: Under Control?
Carter-Reagan-Bush: The Bipartisan Consensus
The Unreported Resistance
The Coming Revolt of the Guards
The Clinton Presidency
Afterword
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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