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Betrayals : Fort William Henry and the massacre /
Ian K. Steele.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1990.
description
viii, 250 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0195058933 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1990.
isbn
0195058933 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
1464116
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 200-240) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Ian K. Steele is Professor of History at the University of Western Ontario. His books include Politics of Colonial Policy, Guerillas and Grenadiers, and the award-winning The English Atlantic, 1675-1740: An Exploration of Communication and Community.
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Wallace K. Ferguson Award, CAN, 1991 : Nominated
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1991-02:
Steele's in-depth analysis of the events concerning the "massacre" of the British and Colonial prisoners after the fall of Fort William Henry argues that the killings resulted from differing concepts of war held by Montcalm and by his Native American allies. Imbued with European notions of "noble" and "civilized" warfare, Montcalm failed to comprehend that most of the warriors fought for personal glory, revenge, or booty. Montcalm's decision to parole the captured British garrison and to allow them to retain their personal possessions denied the Indians the fruits of the victory. The warriors' attempts to seize the British property as the prisoners marched toward Fort Edward precipitated the slaughter. Well written, this heavily documented account provides the most comprehensive discussion available in print of the warfare along the Lake Champlain-Lake George waterway. Highly recommended for a broad spectrum of readers. -R. D. Edmunds, Indiana University--Bloomington
Reviews
Review Quotes
"An interesting reinterpretation of the events surrounding the fall of Fort William Henry. Steele's history of the fort provides an excellent case study of diplomacy and warfare on the northern colonial frontier."--William and Mary Quarterly "An intriguing account of the intricacies of one relatively small episode which had a profound impact on both the outcome of the French-English war in North America and on the actions and attitudes of American generations later.... Short, detailed, and finely textured....Fascinating and well written....Well worth the read."--International History Review "Provides the most comprehensive discussion available in print of the warfare along the Lake Champlain-Lake George waterway. Highly recommended for a broad spectrum of readers."--Choice "A thoughtful, thoroughly rsearched and very well written book which deserves a wide readership."--Journal of the Soviety for Army Historical Research "Betrayals is a compelling narrative of special interest to readers of early Canadian, American, military, and Amer-Indian history."--Loyalist Gazette
"An interesting reinterpretation of the events surrounding the fall of Fort William Henry. Steele's history of the fort provides an excellent case study of diplomacy and warfare on the northern colonial frontier."-- William and Mary Quarterly "An intriguing account of the intricacies of one relatively small episode which had a profound impact on both the outcome of the French-English war in North America and on the actions and attitudes of American generations later.... Short, detailed, and finely textured....Fascinating and well written....Well worth the read."-- International History Review "Provides the most comprehensive discussion available in print of the warfare along the Lake Champlain-Lake George waterway. Highly recommended for a broad spectrum of readers."-- Choice "A thoughtful, thoroughly rsearched and very well written book which deserves a wide readership."-- Journal of the Soviety for Army Historical Research " Betrayals is a compelling narrative of special interest to readers of early Canadian, American, military, and Amer-Indian history."-- Loyalist Gazette
"An interesting reinterpretation of the events surrounding the fall of Fort William Henry. Steele's history of the fort provides an excellent case study of diplomacy and warfare on the northern colonial frontier."--William and Mary Quarterly "An intriguing account of the intricacies of one relatively small episode which had a profound impact on both the outcome of the French-English war in North America and on the actions and attitudes of American generations later.... Short, detailed, and finely textured....Fascinating and well written....Well worth the read."--International History Review "Provides the most comprehensive discussion available in print of the warfare along the Lake Champlain-Lake George waterway. Highly recommended for a broad spectrum of readers."--Choice "A thoughtful, thoroughly rsearched and very well written book which deserves a wide readership."--Journal of the Soviety for Army Historical Research "Betrayalsis a compelling narrative of special interest to readers of early Canadian, American, military, and Amer-Indian history."--Loyalist Gazette
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 1991
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
On the morning of August 9, 1757, British and colonial officers defending the besieged Fort William Henry surrendered to French forces, accepting the generous "parole of honor" offered by General Montcalm. As the column of British and colonials marched with their families and servants to Fort Edward some miles south, they were set upon by the Indian allies of the French. The resulting "massacre," thought to be one of the bloodiest days of the French and Indian War, became forever ingrained in American myth by James Fenimore Cooper's classic novel The Last of the Mohicans. In Betrayals, historian Ian K. Steele gives us the true story behind Cooper's famous book, bringing to life men such as British commander of Fort William Henry George Monro, English General Webb, his French counterpart Montcalm, and the wild frontier world of Natty Bumppo. The Battle of Lake George and the building of the fort marked the return of European military involvement in intercolonial wars, producing an explosive mixture of the contending martial values of Indians, colonials, and European regulars. The Americans and British who were attacked after surrendering, as well as French officers and their Indian allies (the latter enraged by the small amount of English booty allowed them by the French), all felt deeply betrayed. Contemporary accounts of the victims--whose identities Steele has carefully reconstructed from newly discovered sources--helped to create a powerful, racist American folk memory that still resonates today. Survivors included men and women who were adopted into Indian tribes, sold to Canadians in a well-established white servant trade, or jailed in Canada or France as prisoners of war. Explaining the motives for the most notorious massacre of the colonial period, Steele offers a gripping tale of a fledgling America, one which places the tragic events of the Seven Years' War in a fresh historical context. Anyone interested in the fact behind the fiction will find it fascinating reading.
Long Description
This tragic history, which inspired James Fenimore Cooper's The Last of the Mohicans, was an explosive mixture of the contending martial values of Indians, colonials, and European regulars. The conquest of Fort William Henry and the subsequent massacre of English prisoners by Indians, while under French command, is considered by historians to be a turning point in the Seven Years' War (known as the French and Indian War in the United States). Victims of tomahawk,cannibalism, or captivity, whose identities are carefully recovered from new sources, helped create a powerful racist American folk memory. In assembling and analysing the full story for the first time from original sources, Betrayals is a compelling narrative.
Main Description
On the morning of August 9, 1757, British and colonial officers defending the besieged Fort William Henry surrendered to French forces, accepting the generous "parole of honor" offered by General Montcalm. As the column of British and colonials marched with their families and servants to FortEdward some miles south, they were set upon by the Indian allies of the French. The resulting "massacre," thought to be one of the bloodiest days of the French and Indian War, became forever ingrained in American myth by James Fenimore Cooper's classic novel The Last of the Mohicans. In Betrayals, historian Ian K. Steele gives us the true story behind Cooper's famous book, bringing to life men such as British commander of Fort William Henry George Monro, English General Webb, his French counterpart Montcalm, and the wild frontier world of Natty Bumppo. The Battle of LakeGeorge and the building of the fort marked the return of European military involvement in intercolonial wars, producing an explosive mixture of the contending martial values of Indians, colonials, and European regulars. The Americans and British who were attacked after surrendering, as well asFrench officers and their Indian allies (the latter enraged by the small amount of English booty allowed them by the French), all felt deeply betrayed. Contemporary accounts of the victims--whose identities Steele has carefully reconstructed from newly discovered sources--helped to create apowerful, racist American folk memory that still resonates today. Survivors included men and women who were adopted into Indian tribes, sold to Canadians in a well-established white servant trade, or jailed in Canada or France as prisoners of war. Explaining the motives for the most notorious massacre of the colonial period, Steele offers a gripping tale of a fledgling America, one which places the tragic events of the Seven Years' War in a fresh historical context. Anyone interested in the fact behind the fiction will find itfascinating reading.
Main Description
On the morning of August 9, 1757, British and colonial officers defending the besieged Fort William Henry surrendered to French forces, accepting the generous "parole of honor" offered by General Montcalm. As the column of British and colonials marched with their families and servants to Fort Edward some miles south, they were set upon by the Indian allies of the French. The resulting "massacre," thought to be one of the bloodiest days of the French and Indian War, became forever ingrained in American myth by James Fenimore Cooper's classic novelThe Last of the Mohicans. InBetrayals, historian Ian K. Steele gives us the true story behind Cooper's famous book, bringing to life men such as British commander of Fort William Henry George Monro, English General Webb, his French counterpart Montcalm, and the wild frontier world of Natty Bumppo. The Battle of Lake George and the building of the fort marked the return of European military involvement in intercolonial wars, producing an explosive mixture of the contending martial values of Indians, colonials, and European regulars. The Americans and British who were attacked after surrendering, as well as French officers and their Indian allies (the latter enraged by the small amount of English booty allowed them by the French), all felt deeply betrayed. Contemporary accounts of the victims--whose identities Steele has carefully reconstructed from newly discovered sources--helped to create a powerful, racist American folk memory that still resonates today. Survivors included men and women who were adopted into Indian tribes, sold to Canadians in a well-established white servant trade, or jailed in Canada or France as prisoners of war. Explaining the motives for the most notorious massacre of the colonial period, Steele offers a gripping tale of a fledgling America, one which places the tragic events of the Seven Years' War in a fresh historical context. Anyone interested in the fact behind the fiction will find it fascinating reading.
Unpaid Annotation
On the morning of August 9, 1757, British and colonial officers defending the besieged Fort William Henry surrendered to French forces, accepting the generous "parole of honor" offered by General Montcalm. As the column of British and colonials marched with their families and servants to Fort Edward some miles south, they were set upon by the Indian allies of the French. The resulting "massacre," thought to be one of the bloodiest days of the French and Indian War, became forever ingrained in American myth by James Fenimore Cooper's classic novel The Last of the Mohicans.In Betrayals, historian Ian K. Steele gives us the true story behind Cooper's famous book, bringing to life men such as British commander of Fort William Henry George Monro, English General Webb, his French counterpart Montcalm, and the wild frontier world of Natty Bumppo. The Battle of Lake George and the building of the fort marked the return of European military involvement in intercolonial wars, producing an explosive mixture of the contending martial values of Indians, colonials, and European regulars. The Americans and British who were attacked after surrendering, as well as French officers and their Indian allies (the latter enraged by the small amount of English booty allowed them by the French), all felt deeply betrayed. Contemporary accounts of the victims--whose identities Steele has carefully reconstructed from newly discovered sources--helped to create a powerful, racist American folk memory that still resonates today. Survivors included men and women who were adopted into Indian tribes, sold to Canadians in a well-established white servant trade, or jailed in Canada or France as prisoners of war.Explaining the motives for the most notorious massacre of the colonial period, Steele offers a gripping tale of a fledgling America, one which places the tragic events of the Seven Years' War in a fresh historical context. Anyone interested in the fact behind the fiction will find it fascinating reading.
Table of Contents
Approachesp. 3
To Battle for Lake Georgep. 28
Fort William Henry, 1755-1757p. 57
Siegep. 78
"Massacre"p. 109
Aftermathp. 129
Perceptionsp. 149
Missing New England Paroleesp. 187
Notesp. 200
Indexp. 241
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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