Catalogue


Scottish highlanders in colonial Georgia : the recruitment, emigration, and settlement at Darien, 1735-1748 /
Anthony W. Parker.
imprint
Athens : University of Georgia Press, c1997.
description
xiv, 182 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0820319155 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Athens : University of Georgia Press, c1997.
isbn
0820319155 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
1451727
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [167]-178) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Parker's book is to be warmly welcomed, especially in the light of its obvious determination to place the pre-Culloden population flow to Georgia in an explicitly imperial context. . . . Those interested in the much larger scale departures in the years after 1763 will certainly find it rewarding, not least because the author highlights the irony that just as the value of Highland populations was beginning to be undermined within the region itself, the notion of their utility within a broader imperial framework was in the process of steady confirmation."--Scottish Historical Review
"Anthony Parker's study of Scottish Highlanders in Georgia fills a gap in Georgia history. Parker gives a complete account of their background in Scotland and their adventures in Georgia. He writes in a clear, straightforward style that carries the reader through the complexities of life in the Highlands."--Edward J. Cashin, author ofGovernor Henry Ellis and the Transformation of British North America
"A useful addition to our store of knowledge of Highlanders in eighteenth-century America."--Journal of American History
"Parker's book is to be warmly welcomed, especially in the light of its obvious determination to place the pre-Culloden population flow to Georgia in an explicitly imperial context. . . . Those interested in the much larger scale departures in the years after 1763 will certainly find it rewarding, not least because the author highlights the irony that just as the value of Highland populations was beginning to be undermined within the region itself, the notion of their utility within a broader imperial framework was in the process of steady confirmation."-- Scottish Historical Review
"Very well written and informative . . . Parker succeeds in establishing the importance of the Highland Scots at Darien in relation to their impact on other colonies, as well as the state of Georgia's history."-- Journal of Southern History
"Very well written and informative . . . Parker succeeds in establishing the importance of the Highland Scots at Darien in relation to their impact on other colonies, as well as the state of Georgia's history."--Journal of Southern History
"Anthony Parker's study of Scottish Highlanders in Georgia fills a gap in Georgia history. Parker gives a complete account of their background in Scotland and their adventures in Georgia. He writes in a clear, straightforward style that carries the reader through the complexities of life in the Highlands."--Edward J. Cashin, author of Governor Henry Ellis and the Transformation of British North America
"A useful addition to our store of knowledge of Highlanders in eighteenth-century America."-- Journal of American History
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Between 1735 and 1748 hundreds of young men and their families emigrated from the Scottish Highlands to the Georgia coast to settle and protect the new British colony. These men were recruited by the trustees of the colony and military governor James Oglethorpe, who wanted settlers who were accustomed to hardship, militant in nature, and willing to become frontier farmer-soldiers. In this respect, the Highlanders fit the bill perfectly through training and tradition.Recruiting and settling the Scottish Highlanders as the first line of defense on the southern frontier in Georgia was an important decision on the part of the trustees and crucial for the survival of the colony, but this portion of Georgia's history has been sadly neglected until now. By focusing on the Scots themselves, Anthony W. Parker explains what factors motivated the Highlanders to leave their native glens of Scotland for the pine barrens of Georgia and attempts to account for the reasons their cultural distinctiveness and "old world" experience aptly prepared them to play a vital role in the survival of Georgia in this early and precarious moment in its history.
Main Description
Between 1735 and 1748 hundreds of young men and their families emigrated from the Scottish Highlands to the Georgia coast to settle and protect the new British colony. These men were recruited by the trustees of the colony and military governor James Oglethorpe, who wanted settlers who were accustomed to hardship, militant in nature, and willing to become frontier farmer-soldiers. In this respect, the Highlanders fit the bill perfectly through training and tradition. Recruiting and settling the Scottish Highlanders as the first line of defense on the southern frontier in Georgia was an important decision on the part of the trustees and crucial for the survival of the colony, but this portion of Georgia's history has been sadly neglected until now. By focusing on the Scots themselves, Anthony W. Parker explains what factors motivated the Highlanders to leave their native glens of Scotland for the pine barrens of Georgia and attempts to account for the reasons their cultural distinctiveness and "old world" experience aptly prepared them to play a vital role in the survival of Georgia in this early and precarious moment in its history.
Unpaid Annotation
Between 1735 and 1748 hundreds of young men and their families emigrated from the Scottish Highlands to the Georgia coast to settle and protect the new British colony. These men were recruited by the trustees of the colony and military governor James Oglethorpe, who wanted settlers who were accustomed to hardship, militant in nature, and willing to become frontier farmer-soldiers. In this respect, the Highlanders fit the bill perfectly through training and tradition.Recruiting and settling the Scottish Highlanders as the first line of defense on the southern frontier in Georgia was an important decision on the part of the trustees and crucial for the survial of the colony, but this portion of Georgia's history has been sadly neglected until now. By focusing on the Scots themselves, Anthony W. Parker explains what factors motivated the Highlanders to leave their native glens of Scotland for the pine barrens of Georgia and attempts to account for the reasons their cultural distinctiveness and"old world" experience aptly prepared them to play a vital role in the survival of Georgia in this early and precarious moment in its history."Anthony Parker's study of Scottish Highlanders in Georgia fills a gap in Georgia history. Parker gives a complete account of their background in Scotland and their adventures in Georgia. He writes in a clear, straightforward style that carries the reader through the complexities of life in the Highlands". -- Edward J. Cashin, author of Governor Henry Ellis and the Transformation of British North America
Table of Contents
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introductionp. 1
Discovery, Exploration, and First Contests in the Debatable Land Called Georgiap. 5
Changing Conditions in the Highlands of Scotlandp. 23
Highland Recruitment: Fertile Fields for Georgia Settlersp. 38
The Founding of Darienp. 52
War Comes to Darien: The Battle at Fort Mosap. 68
Darien and the Aftermath of Fort Mosa, 1740-1748p. 82
Conclusionp. 94
List of Jacobite Prisoners Sent to South Carolina, 1716p. 101
List of Scottish Settlers to Georgia to 1741p. 106
Petition of the Inhabitants of New Inverness to His Excellency General Oglethorpep. 126
List of Highlanders on the Loyal Judith, 17 September 1741p. 128
Summons to Disarm to the Mackintosh Clan in the Highlands of Scotland, 1725p. 130
Abbreviationsp. 131
Notesp. 133
Selected Bibliographyp. 167
Indexp. 179
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem