Catalogue

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Eighteenth-century English society : shuttles and swords /
Douglas Hay and Nicholas Rogers.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1997.
description
x, 253 p. : ill., maps ; 20 cm.
ISBN
0192891944
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
added author
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1997.
isbn
0192891944
general note
"OPUS."
catalogue key
1426557
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [232]-245) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Written from a left-wing perspective, this text offers a unique focus on the experiences of the lower social classes in the long eighteenth century.
Long Description
The period from 1688-1820 was marked throughout with riots and rebellions, seditions and strikes, as the lower classes rebelled against the state bias towards the interests of higher social groups. Drawing on recent work on demography, labor, and law, this readable history of the period focuses on the experience of the eighty percent of the population who made up England's "lower orders." Hay and Rogers provide fresh insights into food shortages, changes in poor relief, use of the criminal law, and the shifts in social power caused by industrialization that would bring about the birth of working-class radicalism.
Main Description
The period from 1688-1820 was marked throughout with riots and rebellions, seditions and strikes. Yet it began with the welcoming of Prince William of Orange, whose coronation was widely celebrated as a move towards a more democratic state. Parliament and the courts were set to become acentral feature of political life. But in 1819, fifteen men, women, and children were killed and over 400 injured when the yeomanry, directed by the magistracy, attacked the mass meeting for parliamentary reform at St Peter's Field, Manchester. The long eighteenth century was characterized by the gradual erosion of consensual politics: the transfer from a cross-class consensus based on the Whig/Tory divide to divisions based instead on the notion that the state privileged the interests of certain social groups over others. This book drawstogether the implications of recent work on demography, labour, and law to assess their importance for defining those moments and places where class interests met and conflicted. By focusing on the experiences of the eighty percent of the population who made up England's 'lower orders', Douglas Hayand Nicholas Rogers accord new significance to food shortages, changes in poor relief, use of the criminal law, and the shifts in social power caused by industrialization which would bring about the birth of working-class radicalism.
Table of Contents
Preface
Landscapes
Hierarchy
The Politics of Love and Marriage
Political Order
Harvests and Dearth
Custom
The Disruption of Custom, the Triumph of Law
New Populations
The Power of the People
War and Peace
Popular Beliefs and Popular Politics
Class and Power in Hanoverian England
Further Reading
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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