Catalogue


Thanks to God and the Revolution : the oral history of a Nicaraguan family /
Dianne Walta Hart.
imprint
Madison, Wis. : University of Wisconsin Press, c1990.
description
xxii, 306 p.
ISBN
0299126102 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Madison, Wis. : University of Wisconsin Press, c1990.
isbn
0299126102 :
catalogue key
1390512
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 1990-09-21:
Members of a pseudonymous Nicaraguan family here talk about their lives, beginning with accounts of the late Somoza years through the triumph of the 1979 revolution, and ending in 1987. The family consists of elderly Dona Maria Lopez, essentially apolitical but sympathetic to her children's political passions; her daughter Leticia, a Sandinista collaborator and the most articulate, least ingenuous subject; and Leticia's half-sister and half-brother, Marta and Omar, active in the revolution, now employed in Sandinista agencies. Amid occasional squabbling and political grandstanding, a compelling human panorama emerges, and one of tragic dimensions, as family members come to realize the fragility of the revolutionary culture that matters so deeply to them. Hart, a language instructor at Oregon State University who spent 1983 to 1987 meeting with her subjects, makes no claim to objectivity, yet her portrayal conveys great force and her subjects' eloquence. (Nov.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Choice on 1991-07:
From 1984 to 1987, Hart (Oregon State University) conducted a series of interviews with a family from Esteli, Nicaragua. This book consists of the edited transcripts of those interviews, plus introductions and appendixes to provide context. For two reasons the subtitle describes the book more accurately than the title. First, much of the book concerns matters that have little to do with the revolution: an old woman's sickness, the quarrels of a husband and wife, troubles with an in-law. Second, most of the book describes the period when the exhilarating triumph of the insurrection against the dictator Somoza was eclipsed by the bloodshed and impoverishment during the war against the U.S.-sponsored Contras--a time of increasing despair rather than thanks. The family remained loyal to the revolution; but by 1988 they were so worn down by terror, shortages, inflation, and corruption that they were ready to flee to, of all places, the US. Shirely Christian's Nicaragua: Revolution in the Family (1985) portrays Sandinistas as ruthless opportunists motivated chiefly by the will to power. Hart's history of an actual Sandinista family in the revolution shows them as imperfect people who struggle for a fairer world. This book presents the poignant reality of everyday life, violent death, and thwarted revolution. All levels. -J. A. Hijiya, Southeastern Massachusetts University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, September 1990
Choice, July 1991
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Summaries
Main Description
Winner of the 1991 Chicago Women in Publishing Award In a restaurant in Estel, Nicaragua, Dianne Walta Hart, a visiting American scholar, and Marta Lopez, member of a Nicaraguan women's organization, began to talk of the Sandinista revolution and of the changes it had brought, especially for women. Their conversation was to continue at intervals over the next four years; it expanded to include Marta's mother, Doa Mara, her sister, Leticia, and her brother, Omar, a Sandinista soldier. From these conversations has come the powerful and moving oral history of a Nicaraguan family in the twentieth century: a testimonial by ordinary people caught up in civil strife and living in a country devastated by war and inflation. Laying bare the inner workings of the Lopez family, Dianne Walta Hart evokes a picture of a close-knit and loving family. Tracing their story from the years of repression and guerrilla activity under Somoza through an era of personal and political revolution in the 1970s and 1980s, she shows people persevering against every kind of adversity.
Main Description
Winner of the 1991 Chicago Women in Publishing Award In a restaurant in Estelí, Nicaragua, Dianne Walta Hart, a visiting American scholar, and Marta Lopez, member of a Nicaraguan women's organization, began to talk of the Sandinista revolution and of the changes it had brought, especially for women. Their conversation was to continue at intervals over the next four years; it expanded to include Marta's mother, Doña María, her sister, Leticia, and her brother, Omar, a Sandinista soldier. From these conversations has come the powerful and moving oral history of a Nicaraguan family in the twentieth century: a testimonial by ordinary people caught up in civil strife and living in a country devastated by war and inflation. Laying bare the inner workings of the Lopez family, Dianne Walta Hart evokes a picture of a close-knit and loving family. Tracing their story from the years of repression and guerrilla activity under Somoza through an era of personal and political revolution in the 1970s and 1980s, she shows people persevering against every kind of adversity.

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