Catalogue


The New England mind : from colony to province /
Perry Miller.
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, [1983], c1954.
description
513p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0674613066 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, [1983], c1954.
isbn
0674613066 (pbk.)
catalogue key
1383721
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
A fascinating and indispensable book.
A magnificent book, the most illuminating and convincing interpretation of Puritanism that I know and a model example of intellectual historiography. Miller seems to possess a rare combination of gifts and acquired intellectual virtues--disciplined faithfulness to sources, philosophical insight and outlook, creative imagination.
The New England Mind is an authoritative description of Puritanism, the most subtle and most fully coherent intellectual system which has ever functioned as the official code of an American regional society...The book is the best single illustration of what is meant by "the history of ideas" as a method of dealing with American materials.
This classic work towers over the great mass of subsequent scholarship, and remains after forty years our single best work on American Puritanism... For many years to come every serious student of American Puritanism will still have to begin by reading The New England Mind .
This classic work towers over the great mass of subsequent scholarship, and remains after forty years our single best work on American Puritanism... For many years to come every serious student of American Puritanism will still have to begin by reading The New England Mind.
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Summaries
Main Description
The late Perry Miller once stated, "I have been compelled to insist that the mind of man is the basic factor in human history," and his study of the mind in America has shaped the thought of three decades of scholars. The fifteen essays here collected--several of them previously unpublished--address themselves to facets of the American consciousness and to their expression in literature from the time of the Cambridge Agreement to the Nobel Prize acceptance speeches of Hemingway and Faulkner. A companion volume to Errand into the Wilderness, its general theme is one adumbrated in Mr. Miller's two-volume masterpiece, The New England Mind--the thrust of civilization into the vast, empty continent and its effect upon Americans' concept of themselves as "nature's nation." The essays first concentrate on Puritan covenant theology and its gradual adaptation to changing conditions in America: the decline in zeal for a "Bible commonwealth," the growth of trade and industy, and the necessity for coexisting with large masses of unchurched people. As the book progresses, the emphasis shifts from religion to the philosophy of nature to the development of an original literature, although Mr. Miller is usually analyzing simultaneously all three aspects of the American quest for self-identity. In the final essays, he shows how the forces that molded the self-conscious articulateness of the early New Englanders still operate in the work of contemporary American writers. The introduction to this collection is by Kenneth Murdock, Francis Lee Higginson Professor of English Literature, Emeritus, Harvard University, who, with Perry Miller and Samuel Eliot Morison, accomplished what has been called "one of the great historical re-evaluations of this generation."
Main Description
The late Perry Miller once stated, "I have been compelled to insist that the mind of man is the basic factor in human history," and his study of the mind in America has shaped the thought of three decades of scholars. The fifteen essays here collected--several of them previously unpublished--address themselves to facets of the American consciousness and to their expression in literature from the time of the Cambridge Agreement to the Nobel Prize acceptance speeches of Hemingway and Faulkner. A companion volume to Errand into the Wilderness , its general theme is one adumbrated in Mr. Miller's two-volume masterpiece, The New England Mind --the thrust of civilization into the vast, empty continent and its effect upon Americans' concept of themselves as "nature's nation." The essays first concentrate on Puritan covenant theology and its gradual adaptation to changing conditions in America: the decline in zeal for a "Bible commonwealth," the growth of trade and industy, and the necessity for coexisting with large masses of unchurched people. As the book progresses, the emphasis shifts from religion to the philosophy of nature to the development of an original literature, although Mr. Miller is usually analyzing simultaneously all three aspects of the American quest for self-identity. In the final essays, he shows how the forces that molded the self-conscious articulateness of the early New Englanders still operate in the work of contemporary American writers. The introduction to this collection is by Kenneth Murdock, Francis Lee Higginson Professor of English Literature, Emeritus, Harvard University, who, with Perry Miller and Samuel Eliot Morison, accomplished what has been called "one of the great historical re-evaluations of this generation."
Table of Contents
Religion and Learning
The Augustinian Strain of Piety
The Practice of Piety
The Intellectual Character
The Intellectual Heritage
Cosmology
The Instrument of Reason
Knowledge
The Uses of Reason
Nature
Anthropology
The Nature of Man
The Means of Conversion
Rhetoric
The Plain Style
Sociology
The Covenant of Grace
The Social Covenant
The Church Covenant
God's Controversy with New England
Appendix A. The Literature of Ramus' Logic in Europe
Appendix B. The Federal School of Theology
Notes
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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