Catalogue


The Political economy of Ethiopia /
edited by Marina Ottaway.
imprint
New York : Praeger, 1990.
description
vi, 251 p. : ill. --
ISBN
0275934721 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
New York : Praeger, 1990.
isbn
0275934721 (alk. paper)
general note
"Published in cooperation with the School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University."
catalogue key
1378647
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1991-04:
Ottaway, a leading specialist on Ethiopia, has edited this volume based on a conference held at Johns Hopkins University. She gives a staggering delineation of the problems of state formation in Ethiopia, focusing on boundary disputes around the turn of the century, on Ethiopia's insistence on holding on to Eritrea after WW II, on Ethiopia's lack of democracy, and on its inability to maintain law and order. She points out that Ethiopia faces all of these problems at once and that the military "revolution" of 1974 has not been able to remedy any of these conflicts or the additional problems of the economy. Leading specialists tell this dismal story in 11 chapters; five articles deal with the Ethiopian state, the revolution and society, and politics. The problem of the "national question" is covered in four chapters, and development and agriculture is treated in two chapters. The quality of the contributions varies, but taken together the volume represents a valuable analysis of a complex subject. In the final chapter on "Revolution, Nationality, and the Ethiopian State," Clapham concludes on the ironical note that mobilizational Leninism has given political rivals in the state the organizational capacity to resist the political center. Recommended for college libraries and especially for research collections. -L. J. Cantori, University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Reviews
Review Quotes
'œOttaway, a leading specialist on Ethiopia, has edited this volume based on a conference held at Johns Hopkins University. She gives a staggering delineation of the problems of state formation in Ethiopia, focusing on boundary disputes around the turn of the century, on Ethiopia's insistence on holding on to Eritrea after WW II, on Ethiopia's lack of democracy, and on its inability to maintain law and order. She points out that Ethiopia faces all of these problems at once and that the military "revolution" of 1974 has not been able to remedy any of these conflicts or the additional problems of the economy. Leading specialists tell this dismal story in 11 chapters; five articles deal with the Ethiopian state, the revolution and society, and politics. The problem of the "national question" is covered in four chapters, and development and agriculture is treated in two chapters. The quality of the contributions varies, but taken together the volume represents a valuable analysis of a complex subject. In the final chapter on "Revolution, Nationality, and the Ethiopian State," Clapham concludes on the ironical note that mobilizational Leninism has given political rivals in the state the organizational capacity to resist the political center. Recommended for college libraries and especially for research collections.'' Choice
'œResults of a conference at SAIS on Ethiopia, this volume looks at Ethiopia after 15 years of military government. Neither a political nor an economic system are yet in place, and the country remains a permanent charge of the international donor community. Solutions in the near term are dounbtful.'' Booknotes
'œIn revised versions of 12 papers presented a conference in April 1988 at Johns Hopkins U., academics and Ethiopians describe and interpret the African country's 15-year revolution, exploring its successes, failures, and characteristics. History, demographics, and climate are also examined as contributors to the current crises in both politics and economics.'' Reference & Research Book News
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 1991
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
The papers collected here describe and interpret the Ethiopian Revolution and explore its successes, failures, and intrinsic qualities. The contributors express a variety of viewpoints and approaches to the current crisis situation in Ethiopia, demonstrating that although the 15-year revolution has failed to measurably improve the lot of Ethiopians, Ethiopia's history, demographics, and climate have also been important contributing factors. A number of articles deal with aspects of the political crisis while others analyze the economic crisis, looking at present problems and their historical roots.
Long Description
The essays collected here evolved from a two-day conference on Ethiopia held at the Johns Hopkins School for Advanced International Studies. Written by both academics and Ethiopians who have participated personally in the events they discuss, the papers describe and interpret the Ethiopian revolution and explore its successes, failures, and intrinsic qualities. The contributors express a variety of viewpoints and approaches to the current crisis situation in Ethiopia, demonstrating that although the 15-year revolution has failed to measurably improve the lot of Ethiopians, Ethiopia's history, demographics, and climate have also been important contributing factors. A number of articles deal with aspects of the political crisis while others analyze the economic crisis, looking at present problems and their historical roots. Taken together, these essays make a major contribution to our understanding of the persistent problems faced by Ethiopia today. Following the editor's introduction, the volume is divided into three sections. In Part I, four papers explore the Ethiopian state and the problem of power. Individual chapters examine such issues as change and continuity in Ethiopian politics, decisions and elections, and the question of rural transformation. Part II looks at different facets of the national question, now or in the past--the character of the leadership, the concept of government, and the decision-making process. The third section analyzes the current economic crisis in two papers which discuss Ethiopia's agricultural crisis and development strategy. The concluding chapter presents an overall perspective on revolution, nationality, and the Ethiopian state. Students of political economy, African studies, and economic development will find The Political Economy of Ethiopia illuminating reading.
Table of Contents
Introduction
The Crisis of the Ethiopian State and Economy
The Ethiopian State and the Problem of Power The Ethiopian State and the National Question
The Economic Crisis
Conclusion
Selected Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem