Catalogue


New Atlantis revisited : Akademgorodok, the Siberian city of science /
Paul R. Josephson.
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, 1997.
description
xxii, 350 p. : ill., map.
ISBN
0691044546 (cl : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, 1997.
isbn
0691044546 (cl : alk. paper)
catalogue key
1372618
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Marshall Shulman Book Prize, USA, 1998 : Won
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1998-03-01:
Sir Francis Bacon (1561-1626) redeemed his tattered public service career by writing essays that advanced the inductive method of modern science and urged full investigation of all possible outcomes. The scientific utopia described by Josephson parallels and makes tangible Bacon's 1608 dream of a model science city where scholars could seek knowledge. The construction of Akademgorodok won initial funding as part of Nikita Krushchev's program to "bury the West." Lavish support for the creation of this modern science city in the heart of a remote Siberian forest was also expected to hasten economic advancement in resource-rich Siberia. Josephson's lively portrayal of the birth and ultimate decline of free inquiry and decentralization in this one case study reflects his deep understanding of the entire Soviet empire. Akademgorodok, located 2,500 miles east of the prying eyes of Moscow, fostered an intellectual climate that escaped the bounds of traditional top-heavy institutes in Leningrad and Moscow, only to be crushed by Brezhnevite repression by 1968. Akademgorodok remains an unfinished but important work in progress today. All levels of readers. R. M. Ferguson Eastern Connecticut State University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 1998
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
In 1958 construction began on Akademgorodok, a scientific utopian community modeled after Francis Bacon's vision of a "New Atlantis." The city, carved out of a Siberian forest 2,500 miles east of Moscow, was formed by Soviet scientists with Khrushchev's full support. They believed that their rational science, liberated from ideological and economic constraints, would help their country surpass the West in all fields. In a lively history of this city, a symbol of de-Stalinization, Paul Josephson offers the most complete analysis available of the reasons behind the successes and failures of Soviet science--from advances in nuclear physics to politically induced setbacks in research on recombinant DNA.Josephson presents case studies of high energy physics, genetics, computer science, environmentalism, and social sciences. He reveals that persistent ideological interference by the Communist Party, financial uncertainties, and pressures to do big science endemic in the USSR contributed to the failure of Akademgorodok to live up to its promise. Still, a kind of openness reigned that presaged the glasnost of Gorbachev's administration dec
Unpaid Annotation
In 1958 construction began on Akademgorodok, a scientific utopian community modeled after Francis Bacon's vision of a New Atlantis. The city, carved out of a Siberian forest 2,500 miles east of Moscow, was formed by Soviet scientists with Khrushchev's full support. They believed that their rational science, liberated from ideological and economic constraints, would help their country surpass the West in all fields. In a lively history of this city, a symbol of de-Stalinization, Paul Josephson offers the most complete analysis available of the reasons behind the successes and failures of Soviet scienceDLfrom advances in nuclear physics to politically induced setbacks in research on recombinant DNA. Josephson presents case studies of high energy physics, genetics, computer science, environmentalism, and social sciences. He reveals that persistent ideological interference by the Communist Party, financial uncertainties, and pressures to do big science endemic in the USSR contributed to the failure of Akademgorodok to live up to its promise. Still, a kind of openness reigned that presaged the glasnost of Gorbachev's administration decades later. The openness was rooted in the geographical and psychological distance from Moscow and in the informal culture of exchange intended to foster the creative impulse. Akademgorodok is still an important research center, having exposed physics, biology, sociology, economics, and computer science to new investigations, distinct in pace and scope from those performed elsewhere in the Soviet scientific establishment.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Note on Transliteration
Introduction
From Moscow, Leningrad, and Ukraine to the Golden Valleyp. 3
Colliding Beams and Open Trapsp. 43
Siberia - Land of Eternally Green Tomatoesp. 82
Machines Can Think, but Can Humans?p. 120
Siberian Scientists and the Engineers of Naturep. 163
The Siberian Algorithmp. 204
Crackdown: The Communist Party and Academic Freedom in Akademgorodokp. 263
Epiloguep. 305
Notesp. 311
Indexp. 343
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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