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Southern odyssey : selected writings by Sherwood Anderson /
edited by Welford Dunaway Taylor and Charles E. Modlin.
imprint
Athens : University of Georgia Press, c1997.
description
xxv, 251 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
082031899X (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Athens : University of Georgia Press, c1997.
isbn
082031899X (alk. paper)
catalogue key
1354920
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 237-245) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1997-09-01:
Seldom given as much attention as they deserve, the archetypal Ohioan Anderson's last 16 years in and around Virginia are the focus of this helpfully introduced and unobtrusively annotated selection of essays. These unfamiliar works were written by Anderson as editor of two weekly newspapers (one Democrat, the other Republican) that he bought in Marion, Virginia, in 1927. Editors Taylor (English, Univ. of Richmond) and Modlin (English, Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ.) have organized these 38 essays under the five thematic categories Discovering the South, The Southern Highlands, A Country Editor, Southern Labor, and A New South. Always the pilgrim and questioner, always on the side of the underdog, Anderson found in his adopted homeland a still largely agrarian society of rugged individuals that was beginning to suffer the dislocations caused by industrialization. These essays, all vintage Anderson in style and tone, help explain the last phase of a seminal American literary career. Recommended for all libraries.‘Charles Crawford Nash, Cottey Coll., Nevada, Mo. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Seldom given as much attention as they deserve, the archetypal Ohioan Anderson's last 16 years in and around Virginia are the focus of this helpfully introduced and unobtrusively annotated selection of essays. . . . These essays, all vintage Anderson in style and tone, help explain the last phase of a seminal American literary career. Recommended for all libraries."-- Library Journal
"Seldom given as much attention as they deserve, the archetypal Ohioan Anderson's last 16 years in and around Virginia are the focus of this helpfully introduced and unobtrusively annotated selection of essays. . . . These essays, all vintage Anderson in style and tone, help explain the last phase of a seminal American literary career. Recommended for all libraries."--Library Journal
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews, August 1997
Booklist, September 1997
Library Journal, September 1997
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Summaries
Main Description
Southern Odyssey contains the best of Sherwood Anderson's writings about the region where he spent the last sixteen years of his life. In more than forty selections of journalism and fiction, Anderson explores the people and problems of the South. The pieces collected here present Anderson's perceptive vision of the South, combining his love for the region with the fresh observations of an outsider. His work reflects a range of issues that engaged all southerners at a crucial time in their history--the Great Depression, the influence of the New Deal, the painful transition from agriculture to mechanization, the struggle of labor to unionize, and the elemental divisions of race--always with an eye toward the human side of things. Anderson's impressions and convictions concerning his southern experience encompassed more than its troubles, however. He also wrote of the splendor of a Shenandoah spring and the strength of character of the native people. Southern Odyssey is more than a personal record--it is a gallery of southern portraits, drawn in the style that distinguishes Anderson's prose at its best.
Main Description
Southern Odysseycontains the best of Sherwood Anderson's writings about the region where he spent the last sixteen years of his life. In more than forty selections of journalism and fiction, Anderson explores the people and problems of the South.The pieces collected here present Anderson's perceptive vision of the South, combining his love for the region with the fresh observations of an outsider. His work reflects a range of issues that engaged all southerners at a crucial time in their history--the Great Depression, the influence of the New Deal, the painful transition from agriculture to mechanization, the struggle of labor to unionize, and the elemental divisions of race--always with an eye toward the human side of things.Anderson's impressions and convictions concerning his southern experience encompassed more than its troubles, however. He also wrote of the splendor of a Shenandoah spring and the strength of character of the native people.Southern Odysseyis more than a personal record--it is a gallery of southern portraits, drawn in the style that distinguishes Anderson's prose at its best.
Table of Contents
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Chronology
Discovering the Southp. 1
New Orleans, the Double Dealer, and the Modern Movement in Americap. 2
From Dark Laughter, Chapter 10p. 7
Letter to William Faulknerp. 13
A Meeting Southp. 16
The Southp. 26
The Southern Highlandsp. 37
I Build a Housep. 38
A Note on Story Tellingp. 54
Virginia Justicep. 60
Jug of Moonp. 65
A Sentimental Journeyp. 71
Virginiap. 77
A Country Editorp. 84
How I Ran a Small-Town Newspaperp. 85
On Being a Country Editorp. 96
God and the Machine Agep. 101
Negro Singing: Hampton Quartette Entertains Large Crowdp. 103
Buck Fever Says and Buck Fever Says: The Three Hensp. 105
Baptist Foot-Washing Off: Brother Admits Vote for Alp. 108
A Veteran and A Stonewall Jackson Manp. 110
In the Rich Valleyp. 115
Marion to Roanokep. 117
Let's Go Somewhere and A Traveler's Notes: The Shenandoah Valleyp. 120
At the Derbyp. 132
Adrift in Georgia: Savannah; A Traveler's Notes: Macon, Georgia; and Piney Woodsp. 136
Southern Laborp. 145
Elizabethton, Tennesseep. 146
O Ye Poetsp. 151
Nightp. 157
Moderating the Ransom-Barr Debatep. 161
Danville, Virginiap. 165
Lumber Campp. 170
Sugar Makingp. 174
Tobacco Marketp. 180
A New Southp. 186
This Southlandp. 187
Paying for Old Sinsp. 195
The TVAp. 199
They Elected Himp. 205
Hard-Boiledp. 213
City Gangs Enslave Moonshine Mountaineers and from Kit Brandon: A Portrait, Chapter 5p. 217
The Ivanhoe High School Graduation Speechp. 231
Notesp. 237
Indexp. 247
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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