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The power of the mayor [electronic resource] : David Dinkins, 1990-1993 /
Christopher McNickle.
imprint
New Brunswick, N.J. : Transaction Publishers, c2013.
description
xviii, 388 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9781412849593
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New Brunswick, N.J. : Transaction Publishers, c2013.
isbn
9781412849593
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
13444842
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
William Petersen is Robert Lazarus Professor of Social Demography Emeritus at Ohio State University and is known throughout the profession as a leading demographer. Her work has appeared in Population and Development Review, Annual Review of Sociology and Demography.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Being Mayor of New York has been called the second toughest job in America. David Dinkins, the first black Mayor of New York, was confronted with huge problems involving the faltering economy, public safety, and race relations from his first day in office. Chris McNickle has written knowledgeably of Dinkins and his four years at City Hall. This volume has captured the enormous issues Dinkins faced, his successes and failures and the fact that, throughout his tenure, he managed to maintain an affable, courtly demeanor until the end of his term when he said he hoped to be remembered as 'someone who genuinely cared about people, about all people, especially children.'" -Gabe Pressman, senior correspondent, WNBC, New York "Chris McNickle has drawn in his deep and wide knowledge of the New York mayoralty for his book on David Dinkins' mayoralty. Balanced, fair, and engaging, McNickle's The Power of the Mayor explains why Dinkins' failings were often based on his outdated assumptions about both political ideology and the powers available to city's chief executive under a newly drawn charter. This is an essential book for those interested in both modern New York and modern racial politics." -Fred Siegel, senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, author of The Prince of the City: Giuliani, New York, and the Genius of American Life
"Being Mayor of New York has been called the second toughest job in America. David Dinkins, the first black Mayor of New York, was confronted with huge problems involving the faltering economy, public safety, and race relations from his first day in office. Chris McNickle has written knowledgeably of Dinkins and his four years at City Hall. This volume has captured the enormous issues Dinkins faced, his successes and failures and the fact that, throughout his tenure, he managed to maintain an affable, courtly demeanor until the end of his term when he said he hoped to be remembered as 'someone who genuinely cared about people, about all people, especially children.'" --Gabe Pressman, senior correspondent, WNBC, New York "Chris McNickle has drawn in his deep and wide knowledge of the New York mayoralty for his book on David Dinkins' mayoralty. Balanced, fair, and engaging, McNickle's The Power of the Mayor explains why Dinkins' failings were often based on his outdated assumptions about both political ideology and the powers available to city's chief executive under a newly drawn charter. This is an essential book for those interested in both modern New York and modern racial politics." --Fred Siegel, senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, author of The Prince of the City: Giuliani, New York, and the Genius of American Life "McNickle's account, which moves through Dinkins's term thematically, is at its best when it takes on the intersection of popular perception and governance. His handling of the Crown Heights riots of 1992 is nuanced and evenhanded. . . . McNickle convincingly argues that Dinkins was a poor manager of his public image and an ineffective decision-maker in a city that preferred (or, at least, was used to) a shoot-first approach, using many a bungled initiative or poorly chosen official to drive his point home." --Nick Juravich, Dissent "[The Power of the Mayor is a] critique of David Dinkins'four year term as the mayor of New York, noting the flaws of his political leadership style as well as his political successes which were to include balancing four annual budges, preventing a fiscal takeover by the unelected new York State Financial Control Board, a substantial reduction in the crime rate, structural changes to the municipal public school system, and improved access to health care services for the poor. Informed, informative, insightful, detailed, and superbly written." --Library Bookwatch, Midwest Book Review
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Summaries
Main Description
A New York Memoir is about a life lived in New York City over a period of thirty years. The memoir begins in 1975, with author Richard Goodman's arrival in New York as an intimidated newcomer. It follows him through the years as he encounters some of the remarkable people one meets in New York, while harkening back to the inspiration the city provides, especially for artists and young writers. The memoir follows the author as he witnesses tragedies and then ruminates on growing old in New York. It tells of the joys and the difficulties of living in this remarkable city.
Main Description
Chris McNickle argues that New York City Mayor David Dinkins failed to wield the power of the mayor with the skill required to run the city. His Tammany clubhouse heritage and liberal political philosophy made him the wrong man for the time. His deliberate style of decision-making left the government he led lacking in direction. His courtly demeanor and formal personal style alienated him from the people he served while the multi-racial coalition he forged as New Yorks first African-American mayor weakened over time. Dinkins did have a number of successes. He balanced four budgets and avoided a fiscal takeover by the unelected New York State Financial Control Board. Major crime dropped 14 percent and murders fell by more than 12 percent. Dinkins helped initiate important structural changes to the ungovernable school system he inherited. His administration reconfigured health care for the poor and improved access to medical treatment for impoverished New Yorkers. McNickle argues that David Dinkins has received less credit than he is due for his successes because they were overshadowed by his failure to fulfill his promise to guide the city to racial harmony. This stimulating review of a transitional period in New York Citys history offers perspective on what it takes to lead and govern.
Main Description
Chris McNickle argues that New York City Mayor David Dinkins failed to wield the power of the mayor with the skill required to run the city. His Tammany clubhouse heritage and liberal political philosophy made him the wrong man for the time. His deliberate style of decision-making left the government he led lacking in direction. His courtly demeanor and formal personal style alienated him from the people he served while the multi-racial coalition he forged as New York's first African-American mayor weakened over time. Dinkins did have a number of successes. He balanced four budgets and avoided a fiscal takeover by the unelected New York State Financial Control Board. Major crime dropped 14 percent and murders fell by more than 12 percent. Dinkins helped initiate important structural changes to the ungovernable school system he inherited. His administration reconfigured health care for the poor and improved access to medical treatment for impoverished New Yorkers. McNickle argues that David Dinkins has received less credit than he is due for his successes because they were overshadowed by his failure to fulfill his promise to guide the city to racial harmony. This stimulating review of a transitional period in New York City's history offers perspective on what it takes to lead and govern.
Main Description
Official statistics about ethnicity in advanced societies are no better than those in less developed countries. An open industrial society is inherently fluid, and it is as hard to interpret social class and ethnic group there as in a nearly static community. In consequence, the collection and interpretation of ethnic statistics is frequently a battleground where the groups being counted contest each element of every enumeration.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. xi
Scandal, Race, and the Seeds of Victoryp. 1
A City in Search of Harmonyp. 9
Credibility Gap, Budget Gapp. 53
Policies for a Penniless Cityp. 103
Sexual Dysfunction at the School Boardp. 145
A City Living in Fearp. 191
Policing the Policep. 251
Defeatp. 279
Measuring Mayor Dinkins's Mettlep. 345
Bibliographyp. 361
Indexp. 369
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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