Catalogue


The American economy : the struggle for supremacy in the 21st century /
Nicolas Spulber.
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York, NY, USA : Cambridge University Press, 1995.
description
xvii, 286 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521480132 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York, NY, USA : Cambridge University Press, 1995.
isbn
0521480132 (hardback)
catalogue key
1344411
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 253-277) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1996-07-01:
An eminent economist adds to his luster in this work through a profound, carefully documented, wide-scoped review and analysis of the economic challenges confronted by the American economy after WW II and the new global challenges arising out of the competing economies of Japan, Germany, and the European Union. Parts 1 and 2 review the changing structure and growth of the US economy, the transformations induced by the Cold War, and the impact of accelerating technical development throughout the major industrial nations. Policy triumphs as well as failures of the period are assessed and their legacies evaluated. The work sharply criticizes the theses held by many of an "America in Decline"--one that its proponents say can only be averted by strong partnership between government and business (so-called reindustrialization). Spulber denies the very existence of a decline and urges continued reliance on a market-directed economy. In Parts 3 and 4, the author examines the long-range changes in income and employment and in public expenditures, with a generally optimistic view of these trends. Spulber projects a benign view of the shift from manufacturing to services in the US economy and in the relative performance of the US compared to its major competitors. These developments provide a framework of policy proposals for the US to retain technological leadership in the world; these proposals are contrasted with those advanced by the Clinton-Gore administration, which are said to involve an undesirable expansion in the role of government. Recommended for all collections. H. I. Liebling Lafayette College
Reviews
Review Quotes
‘This book makes a contribution in its effective criticism of industrial planning, as the concept has come to be called, and its discussion of the problems and promises of technological change. Professor Spulber provides a consistent and effective counterpoint to such centralized planning as Robert Heilbroner, Albert Gore, Robert Reich, and others have called for.’Gene Smiley, Marquette University
"An eminent economist adds to his luster in this work through a profound, carefully documented, wide-scoped review and analysis of the economic challenges arising out of the American economy after WW II and the new global challenges arising out of the competing economies of Japan, Germany, and the European Union....Recommended for all collections." Choice
‘… a welcome contrast to much of the polemical literature in this area, being firmly grounded in economic analysis and quantitative evidence but remaining accessible and clearly written.’Economic History Review
'Mr. Spulber lucidly discusses US economic growth over the past four decades, focusing on the changing nature of government-business relations, the strength of US technological progress and the 'proliferation of strategic international alliances, joint venture mergers, and acquisitions of foreign firms' in which the US plays the leading role.' Charles Wolf Jr, Wall Street Journal
'Professor Spulber's book gives a balanced response to 'declinists' and advocates of industrial policy. He reminds us that a free, market economy corrects its mistakes and moves forward without the wastes of planning.' Allan H. Meltzer, Carnegie Mellon University
‘Professor Spulber’s book gives a balanced response to ‘declinists’ and advocates of industrial policy. He reminds us that a free, market economy corrects its mistakes and moves forward without the wastes of planning.’Allan H. Meltzer, Carnegie Mellon University
"The book certainly merits the attention of anyone interested academically or politically in the current debate over industrial. Its historical perspective on industrial transformation and the application of that perspective to the modern industrial policy debate in the United States provide valuable insights." Joseph Michael Finger, The Journal of Economic History
'This book makes a contribution in its effective criticism of industrial planning, as the concept has come to be called, and its discussion of the problems and promises of technological change. Professor Spulber provides a consistent and effective counterpoint to such centralized planning as Robert Heilbroner, Albert Gore, Robert Reich, and others have called for.' Gene Smiley, Marquette University
‘Mr. Spulber lucidly discusses US economic growth over the past four decades, focusing on the changing nature of government-business relations, the strength of US technological progress and the ‘proliferation of strategic international alliances, joint venture mergers, and acquisitions of foreign firms’ in which the US plays the leading role.’Charles Wolf Jr, Wall Street Journal
"Mr. Spulber lucidly discusses U.S. economic growth over the past four decades, focusing on the changing nature of government-business relations, the strength of U.S. technological progress and the 'proliferation of strategic international alliances, joint venture mergers, and acquisitions of foreign firms' in which the U.S. plays the leading role." The Wall Street Journal
'... a welcome contrast to much of the polemical literature in this area, being firmly grounded in economic analysis and quantitative evidence but remaining accessible and clearly written.' Economic History Review
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 1996
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Summaries
Main Description
This work focuses on the economic challenges the American economy has faced during the post-World War II era, and on the new challenges - represented notably by the competing economies of Japan, Germany, and of the entire European Union - which confront it as the twenty-first century approaches. Professor Spulber presents a detailed critique of the thesis alleging that the American economy has experienced some kind of decline, and also argues that the economy will continue to move forward energetically and successfully if growth and change are primarily left to emerge from the impulses and incentives of the private economy.
Description for Bookstore
This work focuses on the economic challenges the American economy has met during the post-World War II era, and on the new challenges_represented notably by the competing economies of Japan, Germany, and of the entire European union_which confront it as the 21st century approaches. Professor Spulber presents a detailed critique of the thesis alleging that the American economy had experienced some kind of decline, and also argues that the economy will continue to move forward energetically and successfully if growth and change are primarily left to emerge from the impulses and incentives of the private economy.
Main Description
This work focuses on the economic challenges the American economy has met during the post-World War II era, and on the new challenges--represented notably by the competing economies of Japan, Germany, and the entire European union--that confront it as the twenty-first century approaches. The book shows how the transformations brought about by international competition fit the long-term processes of economic growth and change with respect to structural mutations, technological development, the role of the government, and the evolution of government-business relations. Nicholas Spulber presents a detailed critique of the thesis alleging that the American economy had experienced some kind of decline, and argues that the economy will continue to move forward energetically and successfully if growth and change are primarily left to emerge from the impulses and incentives of the private economy.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Spulber focuses on the economic challenges the American economy has faced during the post-World War II era, presenting a detailed critique of the thesis which alleges that the American economy has experienced some kind of decline in this period.
Description for Bookstore
This work focuses on the challenges the American economy has faced during the post-World War II era, and on the twenty-first-century challenges of Japan, Germany, and the entire European Union. The author challenges the view that the US economy has experienced a post-war decline, and illustrates how the economy will experience growth and change.
Table of Contents
Preface
A Challenge Met
Postwar growth and change
Government-business relationship
The New Challenge and its Implications
The challenge
The implications
The Long Run Development of the US Economy
The structural transformations
The state machine and the evolving economy
The Road Ahead
New priorities
Contests at technological frontiers
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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