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Jane Carlyle [electronic resource] : newly selected letters /
edited by Kenneth J. Fielding and David R. Sorensen.
imprint
Aldershot, Hants, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2004.
description
xxxvii, 334 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0754601374 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Aldershot, Hants, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2004.
isbn
0754601374 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
13438533
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. xxxiii-xxxiv) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-05-01:
Jane Carlyle was the wife of Thomas Carlyle and a skilled storyteller, social critic, gossip, and confidante whose letters (published in several collections) have titillated modern readers. This new selection includes not only 250 letters but also fresh discoveries, e.g., her autobiographical short fiction "The Simple Story of My Own First Love" and an 1850 interview of Jane. Why are scholars and readers so avid to understand this literary woman? Perhaps it is her style--irony, sarcasm, humor, wit, spontaneity--or perhaps it is the mystery that surrounds her: Why was she often depressed? What caused the bruises on her wrists? Was she a feminist? What was the nature of her 14-year relationship with Lady Harriet Ashburton (her husband's special friend)? Was her husband sexually viable? Fielding and Sorensen let the quixotic Jane tell her own story in this exemplary edition, which includes brief commentary on individual letters along with illustrations, chronology, and an index of correspondents. The volume joins Rosemary Ashton's Thomas and Jane Carlyle, Portrait of a Marriage (London, 2002) and Aileen Christianson's essay "Jane Walsh Carlyle's Private Writing Career," published in History of Scottish Women's Writing, ed. by Douglas Gifford and Dorothy McMillan (Edinburgh, 1997). ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All collections; all levels. S. A. Parker emerita, Hiram College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2005
Wall Street Journal, September 2006
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Thomas Carlyle's high opinion of his wife's letters has been vindicated by others on a number of occasions. Now another selection from the thousands available is presented to enrich our understanding of Jane Carlyle's achievements.
Long Description
This new selection of the letters of Jane Welsh Carlyle presents a complete view of a remarkable Victorian woman, with a wide circle of friends, who enjoyed the company of distinguished thinkers, writers, politicians, feminists, eccentrics and radicals. This edition draws on many remarkable letters and papers not published before, in which she created a memorable epistolary voice - shrewd, vigorous, ironic, observant, humorous and passionate. Previous selections have often tamely followed the semi-mythical version of her life first given by Carlyle's biographer, James Anthony Froude, showing her as the victimized angel in distress. This new selection gives a rounded picture of her complex character, showing her as a tormented yet forceful woman who was a strong personality in her own right. She now emerges as a self-conscious artist, adept at constructing images of herself that were designed to appeal to her particular correspondents. The account is written with close attention to Jane Carlyle's long-running jealousy of Lady Harriet Ashburton; and fresh letters include many to her mother and her vital response to her passionate lover or admirer Charlotte Cushman. Each letter is a tightly controlled performance, which justifies Thomas Carlyle's belief that her letters equal and surpass whatever of best I know to exist in that kind.
Main Description
This new selection of the letters of Jane Welsh Carlyle presents a complete view of a remarkable Victorian woman, with a wide circle of friends, who enjoyed the company of distinguished thinkers, writers, politicians, feminists, eccentrics and radicals. This edition draws on many remarkable letters and papers not published before, in which she created a memorable epistolary voice shrewd, vigorous, ironic, observant, humorous and passionate. Previous selections have often tamely followed the semi-mythical version of her life first given by Carlyle's biographer, James Anthony Froude, showing her as the victimized "angel in distress." This new selection gives a rounded picture of her complex character, showing her as a tormented yet forceful woman who was a strong personality in her own right. She now emerges as a self-conscious artist, adept at constructing images of herself that were designed to appeal to her particular correspondents. The account is written with close attention to Jane Carlyle's long-running jealousy of Lady Harriet Ashburton; and fresh letters include many to her mother and her vital response to her passionate lover or admirer Charlotte Cushman. Each letter is a tightly controlled performance, which justifies Thomas Carlyle's belief that her letters "equal and surpass whatever of best I know to exist in that kind."
Unpaid Annotation
This new selection of the letters of Jane Welsh Carlyle presents a complete view of a remarkable Victorian woman with a wide circle of friends, who enjoyed the company of distinguished thinkers, writers, politicians, feminists, eccentrics and radicals. This edition draws on many remarkable letters and papers not published before, in which she created a memorable epistolary voice-shrewd, vigorous, ironic, observant, humorous and passionate. Previous selections have often tamely followed the semi-mythical version of her life first given by Carlyle's biographer, James Anthony Froude, showing her as the victimized "angel in distress." This new selection gives a rounded picture of her complex character, showing her as a tormented yet forceful woman who was a strong personality in her own right.
Table of Contents
Editors' introduction: selecting Jane Carlyle's letters
Bibliography
Chronology
Editorial note
In search of genius, 1819-26
In these moors, 1828-34
This stirring life - and a parting, 1834-42
Turned adrift in the world, 1842-45
Finding a mission, 1845-47
Looking out into the vague, 1847-49
Unease in Zion, 1850-56
Two interludes
Past mending, 1857-60
Spiritual magnetism, 1861-63
Like a dim nightmare, 1863-64
The perfectly extraordinary woman, 1865-66
Indexes
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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