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Domestic politics and family absence [electronic resource] : the correspondence (1588-1621) of Robert Sidney, first Earl of Leicester, and Barbara Gamage Sidney /
edited by Margaret P. Hannay, Noel J. Kinnamon, and Michael G. Brennan.
imprint
Aldershot, Hants, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2005.
description
xvi, 272 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0754606007 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2005
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This collection of letters from Robert Sidney, first Earl of Leicester, to his wife is a record of an affectionate marriage that endured long absences, the deaths of most of their children, crushing financial problems, and the physical decline of old age.
Long Description
Though all but three of Robert Sidney's 332 extant letters to his wife Barbara Gamage Sidney have been in the Sidney family archive, they have never previously been fully transcribed or edited. This edition of the surviving letters, which Sidney wrote to his wife when they were separated for long periods by his official duties at various continental locations, provides a wealth of information about the Sidneys' family life. They touch on matters such as family illnesses, the children's education, court gossip, finances, and the construction of additions to Penshurst Place, the seat of the Sidney family. The letters also offer an extraordinary record of an early-modern English household in which the wife was entrusted with the overall responsibility for the well-being of her family, and for managing a large estate in the absence of her husband.Sidney's letters show that, although his union with the wealthy Welsh heiress Barbara Gamage may have been engineered primarily for political and financial ends, clearly the couple enjoyed a happy and loving marriage. Their correspondence is full of endearments, and Robert frequently tells his wife how much he misses her and their beloved children, including his 'Malkin,' later Lady Mary Wroth.The volume includes an introduction and notes by the editors. It also includes contextual materials such as relevant sections on family matters from letters to Robert from his trusted agent, Rowland Whyte; and from Robert Sidney's own business correspondence. The introduction specifically addresses the issue of Barbara's literacy, within the broader context of late-Elizabethan women's literacy.
Main Description
This edition of Robert Sidney's surviving letters to his wife Barbara Gamage Sidney provides a wealth of information about the Sidneys' family life. It also offers an extraordinary record of an early modern English household in which the wife was entrusted with the overall responsibility for the well-being of her family, and for managing a large estate in the absence of her husband. The volume includes an introduction and notes by the editors, as well as other contextual materials. The introduction specifically addresses the issue of Barbara's literacy, within the broader context of late-Elizabethan women's literacy.
Unpaid Annotation
This edition of Robert Sidney's surviving letters to his wife Barbara Gamage Sidney provides a wealth of information about the Sidney's family life. It also offers an extraordinary record of an early modern English household in which the wife was entrusted with the overall responsibility for the well-being of her family and for managing a large estate in the absence of her husband. The volume includes an introduction and notes by the editors, as well as other contextual materials. The introduction specifically addresses the issue of Barbara's literacy, within the broader context of late-Elizabethan women's literacy.
Unpaid Annotation
Though all but three of Robert Sidney's 332 letters to his wife Barbara Gamage Sidney have been preserved since about the late sixteenth century, they have never been fully transcribed or edited. This edition of the surviving letters, which Sidney wrote to his wife, provides a wealth of information about the Sidney's family life. They touch on matters such on matters such as family illnesses, the children's education, court gossip, finances, and the construction of additions to Penshurst Place, the seat of the Sidney family. The letters also offer an extraordinary record of an early modern English household in which the wife ws entrusted with the overall responsibility for the well-being of her family, and for managing a large estate in the absence of her husband.
Table of Contents
General editor's preface
Acknowledgements
Abbreviations
Illustrations, Sidney family tree
Sidney family alliances reflected in correspondence
Introduction
Letters about accounts
Principles of modernization
A note on the text
General description of the De L'Isle and Dudley letters
The letters
Persons and places
Appendix: 'To Penshurst'
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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