Catalogue

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Women's literary collaboration, queerness, and late-Victorian culture [electronic resource] /
Jill R. Ehnenn.
imprint
Aldershot, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2008.
description
x, 207 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0754652947 (alk. paper), 9780754652946 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Aldershot, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2008.
isbn
0754652947 (alk. paper)
9780754652946 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Examination of the collaborations of Vernon Lee (Violet Paget) and "Kit" Anstruther-Thomson; Somerville and Ross (Edith Somerville and Violet Martin); Elizabeth Robins and Florence Bell; and Katharine Bradley and Edith Cooper (the pseudonymous Michael Field)
catalogue key
13426089
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [179]-192) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This work focuses mostly on four diverse sets of women whose collaborative life and work earned public acclaim on various accounts, including Michael Field, the pseudonym of Katharine Harris Bradley (1846-1914), and Edith Emma Cooper (1862-1913), aunt and niece who lived and wrote together for 30 years and kept a collaborative diary.
Long Description
The first full-length study to focus exclusively on nineteenth-century British women while examining queer authorship and culture, Jill R. Ehnenn's book is a timely interrogation into the different histories and functions of women's literary partnerships. For Vernon Lee (Violet Paget) and Kit Anstruther-Thomson; Somerville and Ross (Edith Somerville and Violet Martin); Elizabeth Robins and Florence Bell; and Katharine Bradley and Edith Cooper, the couple who wrote under the pseudonym of Michael Field, collaborative life and work functioned strategically, as sites of discursive resistance that critique Victorian culture in ways that would be characterized today as feminist, lesbian, and queer. Ehnenn's project shows that collaborative texts from such diverse genres as poetry, fiction, drama, the essay, and autobiography negotiate many limitations of post-Enlightenment patriarchy: Cartesian subjectivity and solitary creativity, industrial capitalism and alienated labor, and heterosexism. In so doing, these jointly authored texts employ a transgressive aesthetic and invoke the potentials of female spectatorship, refusals of representation, and the rewriting of history. Ehnenn's book will be a valuable resource for scholars and students of Victorian literature and culture, women's and gender studies, and collaborative writing.
Main Description
As she explores the collaborations of Vernon Lee (Violet Paget) and Kit Anstruther-Thomson; Somerville and Ross (Edith Somerville and Violet Martin); Elizabeth Robins and Florence Bell; and Katharine Bradley and Edith Cooper (the pseudonymous Michael Field), Jill R. Ehnenn offers a timely interrogation into the different histories and functions of women's literary partnerships. Her book will be a valuable resource for scholars of Victorian culture, women's and gender studies, and collaborative writing.
Table of Contents
Coming together: an introduction
The 'art and mystery of collaboration': authorial economies, queer pleasures
Looking strategically: feminist and queer aesthetics in 'beauty and ugliness' and Sight and Song
Refusing to perform: performative silences in A Question of Memory and Alan's Wife
Collaborating with history: The Tragic Mary and The Real Charlotte
Engaging differences
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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