Catalogue

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Representing female artistic labour, 1848-1890 [electronic resource] : refining work for the middle-class woman /
Patricia Zakreski.
imprint
Aldershot, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2006.
description
219 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0754651037 (alk. paper), 9780754651031 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Aldershot, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2006.
isbn
0754651037 (alk. paper)
9780754651031 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Introduction : refining work -- Needlework and creativity in representations of the seamstress -- A suitable employment for women : the woman artist and the principle of compatibility -- The difference is great in being known to write and setting up for an authoress : representing the writing woman -- Unceasing industry : work and the female performer.
catalogue key
13401901
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [189]-212) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, May 2007
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Patricia Zakreski uses the structure of the gender borderland to describe women's relationship to work. She shows how the notion of work for women was not only refined by reference to the domestic ideal, but also came to be seen as an experience with intrinsic refining qualities in itself.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Patricia Zekreski uses the structure of the gender borderland to describe women's relationship to work. It shows how the notion of work for women was not only refined by reference to the domestic ideal, but also came to be seen as an experience with intrinsic refining qualities in itself.
Long Description
Patricia Zakreski's interdisciplinary study draws on fiction, prose, painting, and the periodical press to expand and redefine our understanding of women's relationship to paid work during the Victorian period. While the idea of 'separate spheres' has largely gone uncontested by feminist critics studying female labour during the nineteenth century, Zakreski challenges this distinction by showing that the divisions between public and private were, in fact, surprisingly flexible, with homes described as workplaces and workplaces as homes. By combining art with forms of industrial or mass production in representations of the respectable woman worker, writers projected a form of paid creative work that was not violated or profaned by the public world of the market in which it was traded. Looking specifically at sewing, art, writing, and acting, Zakreski shows how these professions increasingly came to be defined as 'artistic' and thus as suitable professions for middle-class women, and argues that the supposedly degrading activity of paid work could be transformed into a refining experience for women. Rather than consigning working women to the margins of patriarchal culture, then, her study shows how representations of creative women, by authors such as Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Dinah Craik, Charles Dickens, Anthony Trollope, and Charlotte Yonge, participated in and shaped new forms of mainstream culture.
Main Description
Patricia Zakreski's interdisciplinary study draws on fiction, prose, painting, and the periodical press to expand and redefine our understanding of women's relationship to paid work during the Victorian period. Looking specifically at sewing, art, writing, and acting, Zakreski shows how representations of creative women, by authors such as Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Dinah Craik, Charles Dickens, Anthony Trollope, and Charlotte Yonge, participated in and shaped new forms of mainstream culture.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Refining work
Needlework and creativity in representations of the seamstress
'A suitable employment for women': The woman artist and the principle of compatibility
'The difference is great in being known to write and setting up for an authoress': representing the writing woman
Unceasing industry: work and the actress
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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