Catalogue


Frontier nomads of Iran : a political and social history of the Shahsevan /
Richard Tapper.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1997.
description
xvii, 429 p. : ill., maps.
ISBN
0521583365 (hardcover)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1997.
isbn
0521583365 (hardcover)
catalogue key
1323887
 
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1998-07:
Tapper's book is a superbly documented and analyzed political and social history of the Shahsevan, one of Iran's major tribal, ethnic, and national minority groups, located on the frontiers of Azarbaijan in the northwest. Based on both ethnographic and documentary research conducted over a span of many years, his account is the most scholarly extant history of any tribally organized nomadic pastoral people in Iran. As a significant sociopolitical group, the Shahsevan originated in the 16th to the 18th centuries, but reliable records exist only from the early 18th century. The author frames his discussion by theoretical analyses of identity, ethnicity, nationalism, and the relationship between tribes and states in Iran and in the wider Middle East. He conducted anthropological research among the Shahsevan in 1965-66 and visited several times briefly in the 1990s to collect new documentary material. A few pages cover the period between 1966 and 1995, which includes the postrevolutionary era. Tapper's other anthropological research in neighboring Afghanistan and Turkey helps him to view Shahsevan history and society in a comparative fashion. The text is heavily supported by figures, maps, photographs, notes, and references. Highly recommended. Graduate, faculty. L. Beck; Washington University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...a rich, ambitious and complicated book....Clearly, this book is a must for those who want to discuss tribalism in the Middle East in general and of its role in Iran's history in particular." Willem Floor, Journal of the American Oriental Society
'Frontier Nomads is an impressive work of scholarship, demonstrating the breadth of Tapper's knowledge and his historical as well as ethnographic skills, and his ability to combine them to good effect ... definitely required reading for anyone interested in the history and society of Iran and the relationship between tribe and state in general.' Bulletin of the School of Oriental & African Studies
'Frontier Nomads is an impressive work of scholarship, demonstrating the breadth of Tapper's knowledge and his historical as well as ethnographic skills, and his ability to combine them to good effect ... definitely required reading for anyone interested in the history and society of Iran and the relationship between tribe and state in general.'Bulletin of the School of Oriental & African Studies
‘Frontier Nomads is an impressive work of scholarship, demonstrating the breadth of Tapper’s knowledge and his historical as well as ethnographic skills, and his ability to combine them to good effect … definitely required reading for anyone interested in the history and society of Iran and the relationship between tribe and state in general.’Bulletin of the School of Oriental & African Studies
‘This book is a study of considerable erudition and practical good sense, the result of extensive documentary research and intensive fieldwork … much enriched by historical detail and pertinent comment … it is remarkable how much this demanding but informative study conveys to the reader with great integrity, clarity and judgement.’Asian Affairs
'This book is a study of considerable erudition and practical good sense, the result of extensive documentary research and intensive fieldwork ... much enriched by historical detail and pertinent comment ... it is remarkable how much this demanding but informative study conveys to the reader with great integrity, clarity and judgement.' Asian Affairs
'This book is a study of considerable erudition and practical good sense, the result of extensive documentary research and intensive fieldwork ... much enriched by historical detail and pertinent comment ... it is remarkable how much this demanding but informative study conveys to the reader with great integrity, clarity and judgement.'Asian Affairs
"...the rigor with which he examines and uses his sources in the deconstruction and reconstruction of Shahsevan origins and identity is commendable." Philip S. Khoury, American Historical Review
"...Tapper's Frontier Nomads of Iran is the most significant ethnological study of tribes in Persia to have been published during the past decade." Pierre Oberling, Journal of Anthropological Research
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 1998
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Tapper traces the political and social history of one of Iran's major nomadic peoples, discussing how far changes in tribal formations are a function of relations with states and how different constructions of identity determine views of the past.
Description for Bookstore
Based on three decades of ethnographic fieldwork and documentary research, the book traces the political and social history of the Shahsevan, one of the major nomadic peoples of Iran.
Description for Bookstore
Based on three decades of ethnographic fieldwork and documentary research, the book traces the political and social history of the Shahsevan, one of the major nomadic peoples of Iran.It is a dramatic story, recounting the mythical origins of the tribes, their unification as a confederacy and their eventual decline.In its synthesis of anthropology and history, the book will make a major contribution to the study of the Middle East and Central Asia, and also to current debates on tribe-state relations and the relationship between identity and history.
Description for Bookstore
Based on three decades of ethnographic fieldwork and documentary research, this 1997 book traces the political and social history of the Shahsevan, one of the major nomadic peoples of Iran.
Description for Library
Based on three decades of ethnographic fieldwork and documentary research, the book traces the political and social history of the Shahsevan, one of the major nomadic peoples of Iran. It is a dramatic story, recounting the mythical origins of the tribes, their unification as a confederacy and their eventual decline. In its synthesis of anthropology and history, the book will make a major contribution to the study of the Middle East and Central Asia, and also to theoretical debates on tribe state relations and the relationship between identity and history.
Main Description
Based on three decades of ethnographic fieldwork and documentary research, this book traces the political and social history of the Shahsevan, one of the major nomadic peoples of Iran. It is a dramatic story, recounting the mythical origins of the tribes, their unification as a confederacy and their eventual decline. In its synthesis of anthropology and history, the book will make a major contribution to the study of the Middle East and Central Asia, and also to current debates on tribe-state relations and the relationship between identity and history.
Main Description
Richard Tapper's 1997 book, which is based on three decades of ethnographic fieldwork and extensive documentary research, traces the political and social history of the Shahsevan, one of the major nomadic peoples of Iran. The story is a dramatic one, recounting the mythical origins of the tribes, their unification as a confederacy, and their decline under the Pahlavi Shahs. The book is intended as a contribution to three different debates. The first concerns the riddle of Shahsevan origins, while another considers how far changes in tribal social and political formations are a function of relations with states. The third discusses how different constructions of the identity of a particular people determine their view of the past. In this way, the book promises not only to make a major contribution to the history and anthropology of the Middle East and Central Asia, but also to theoretical debates in both disciplines.
Main Description
Richard Tapper’s book, which is based on three decades of ethnographic fieldwork and extensive documentary research, traces the political and social history of the Shahsevan, one of the major nomadic peoples of Iran. The story is a dramatic one, recounting the mythical origins of the tribes, their unification as a confederacy, and their decline under the Pahlavi Shahs. The book is intended as a contribution to three different debates. The first concerns the riddle of Shahsevan origins, while another considers how far changes in tribal social and political formations are a function of relations with states. The third discusses how different constructions of the identity of a particular people determine their view of the past. In this way, the book promises not only to make a major contribution to the history and anthropology of the Middle East and Central Asia, but also to theoretical debates in both disciplines.
Main Description
Richard Tapper's book, which is based on three decades of ethnographic fieldwork and extensive documentary research, traces the political and social history of the Shahsevan, one of the major nomadic peoples of Iran. The story is a dramatic one, recounting the mythical origins of the tribes, their unification as a confederacy, and their decline under the Pahlavi Shahs. The book is intended as a contribution to three different debates. The first concerns the riddle of Shahsevan origins, while another considers how far changes in tribal social and political formations are a function of relations with states. The third discusses how different constructions of the identity of a particular people determine their view of the past. In this way, the book promises not only to make a major contribution to the history and anthropology of the Middle East and Central Asia, but also to theoretical debates in both disciplines.
Table of Contents
List of illustrations
Preface
Acknowledgments
Note on transliteration
Glossary
Writing tribal history
The Safavid State and the Origins of the Shahsevan
'Shahsevani': Safavid tribal policy and practice
Shahsevan traditions
Moghan and Ardabil in Safavid times
The Rise of the Shahsevan Confederacy
Badr Khan Sari-Khan-Beyli
Nazar 'Ali Khan Shahsevan of Ardabil
The Shahsevan tribal confederacy
The Shahsevan Tribes in the Great Game
The Russian wars and the loss of Moghan
The Shahsevan nomads in the mid-nineteenth century
Nomads and commissars in Moghan
The End of the Tribal Confederacy
Pastures new: the effects of the frontier closure
The Shahsevan, the Constitution, the Great War and after
Settlement and detribalization
Conclusion: Shahsevan identity and history
Appendices
Bibliography
Indexes
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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