Catalogue

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The abacus and the sword : the Japanese penetration of Korea, 1895-1910 /
Peter Duus.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1995.
description
xiv, 480 p., [12] p. of plates : ill.
ISBN
0520086147 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1995.
isbn
0520086147 (alk. paper)
general note
"Lilienthal book."
catalogue key
1323185
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"This is a major historical work that, in the field of Japanese imperialism, will set a standard for careful and comprehensive analysis.The Abacus and the Swordis the handiwork of a master historian."--Mark R. Peattie, author ofNan'yo: The Rise and Fall of the Japanese in Micronesia, 1885-1945 "This book . . . deserves a wide readership, especially among East Asia history specialists, for it represents difficult and complex scholarship at its best. . . . It is clear from an analysis of his documentation that he put solid study into the Japan-Korea relationship problem, one of the most complex in modern East Asian history--the equivalent perhaps of the English-Irish relationship in Western History. . . . This book is . . . well worth reading, not only for East Asian specialists but for anyone fascinated by the mysteries of history." Hilary Conroy, American Academy of Political Science
Flap Copy
"This is a major historical work that, in the field of Japanese imperialism, will set a standard for careful and comprehensive analysis. The Abacus and the Swordis the handiwork of a master historian."--Mark R. Peattie, author of Nan'yo: The Rise and Fall of the Japanese in Micronesia, 1885-1945 "This book . . . deserves a wide readership, especially among East Asia history specialists, for it represents difficult and complex scholarship at its best. . . . It is clear from an analysis of his documentation that he put solid study into the Japan-Korea relationship problem, one of the most complex in modern East Asian history--the equivalent perhaps of the English-Irish relationship in Western History. . . . This book is . . . well worth reading, not only for East Asian specialists but for anyone fascinated by the mysteries of history." Hilary Conroy, American Academy of Political Science
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1996-02:
Duus has filled an important gap in the understanding of why and how the 1910 Japanese annexation of Korea took place, and has gone beyond that to suggest how it might be viewed in the context of 19th- and 20th-century imperialism. His study is likely to become the standard work on the evolution and implementation of Japanese policy toward Korea. Wide-ranging and thorough, the book is based on careful reading of major primary and secondary works in Japanese. The first section deals with the politics of the historical process from 1876-1910. Part 2 is an analysis of the economic ramifications of that process. Duus addresses issues of trade, migration, land policy, and ethnic and cultural policy in substantial detail. It is the framework, however, that Duus provides in his introduction and conclusion that gives the book its larger significance. His introduction establishes a world context; in his conclusion he proposes that Japanese imperialism be viewed not as parallel to Western imperialism but rather as parallel to that of Czarist Russia. Although Duus is quick to point out that his is not an entirely new interpretation, it is a new formulation that goes well beyond those put forth by Japanese historians and will be very helpful in understanding 20th-century history. Copious footnotes and an extensive bibliography of works in Japanese and Western languages. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. H. Bailey; Earlham College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 1996
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Summaries
Long Description
What forces were behind Japan's emergence as the first non-Western colonial power at the turn of the twentieth century? Peter Duus brings a new perspective to Meiji expansionism in this pathbreaking study of Japan's acquisition of Korea, the largest of its colonial possessions. He shows how Japan's drive for empire was part of a larger goal to become the economic, diplomatic, and strategic equal of the Western countries who had imposed a humiliating treaty settlement on the country in the 1850s. Duus maintains that two separate but interlinked processes, one political/military and the other economic, propelled Japan's imperialism. Every attempt at increasing Japanese political influence licensed new opportunities for trade, and each new push for Japanese economic interests buttressed, and sometimes justified, further political advances. The sword was the servant of the abacus, the abacus the agent of the sword. While suggesting that Meiji imperialism shared much with the Western colonial expansion that provided both model and context, Duus also argues that it was "backward imperialism" shaped by a sense of inferiority vis-agrave;-vis the West. Along with his detailed diplomatic and economic history, Duus offers a unique social history that illuminates the motivations and lifestyles of the overseas Japanese of the time, as well as the views that contemporary Japanese had of themselves and their fellow Asians.
Main Description
What forces were behind Japan's emergence as the first non-Western colonial power at the turn of the twentieth century? Peter Duus brings a new perspective to Meiji expansionism in this pathbreaking study of Japan's acquisition of Korea, the largest of its colonial possessions. He shows how Japan's drive for empire was part of a larger goal to become the economic, diplomatic, and strategic equal of the Western countries who had imposed a humiliating treaty settlement on the country in the 1850s. Duus maintains that two separate but interlinked processes, one political/military and the other economic, propelled Japan's imperialism. Every attempt at increasing Japanese political influence licensed new opportunities for trade, and each new push for Japanese economic interests buttressed, and sometimes justified, further political advances. The sword was the servant of the abacus, the abacus the agent of the sword. While suggesting that Meiji imperialism shared much with the Western colonial expansion that provided both model and context, Duus also argues that it was "backward imperialism" shaped by a sense of inferiority vis-à-vis the West. Along with his detailed diplomatic and economic history, Duus offers a unique social history that illuminates the motivations and lifestyles of the overseas Japanese of the time, as well as the views that contemporary Japanese had of themselves and their fellow Asians.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Abbreviations
Introduction: The Origins of Meiji Imperialismp. 1
The Korean Question, 1876-1894p. 29
The Failed Protectorate, 1894-1895p. 66
Japanese Power in Limbo, 1895-1898p. 103
The Race for Concessions, 1895-1901p. 134
Toward the Protectorate, 1901-1905p. 169
The Politics of the Protectorate, 1905-1910p. 201
Capturing the Market: Japanese Trade in Koreap. 245
Dreams of Brocade: Migration to Koreap. 289
Strangers in a Strange Land: The Settler Communityp. 324
The Korean Land Grab: Agriculture and Land Acquisitionp. 364
Defining the Koreans: Images of Dominationp. 397
Conclusion: Mimesis and Dependencep. 424
Bibliographyp. 439
Indexp. 461
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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