Catalogue


Reinventing the Soviet self : media and social change in the former Soviet Union /
Jennifer Turpin.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, c1995.
description
x, 154 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0275950433 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, c1995.
isbn
0275950433 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
1314075
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [135]-144) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1996-01-01:
Envy the excitement of the scholar researching radical social and political change, but envy not that scholar's task in analyzing and interpreting the resulting data. Turpin (sociology, Univ. of San Francisco) sets out to chronicle and interpret Soviet media and the radical media transformation from the Brezhnev to the Gorbachev era. She contends that media effectively served the conservative objectives of Brezhnev, as later the reformist goals of Gorbachev until his eventual pullback toward conservatism. Portions of Turpin's narrative seem up-to-date now in the early post-Soviet period, but at points the writer seems caught in the quicksand of Soviet national dissolution. The title hints at a book that at birth was already dated by fundamental change. One wonders too why Turpin features the transformation of just two Soviet publications, Soviet Life and Moscow News, both published in English, with atypical roles and audiences. A glimpse at the revision in radio and television, comparison of a liberal publication such as Ogonok with a conservative one like Sovetskaia Rossia, or treatment of the role of the radical Nezavisimaya Gazeta would have broadened and enriched the reader's understanding. Still, much here is praiseworthy. Turpin writes engaging and interesting prose, free of jargon, gives a valuable accounting of the nominally independent Novosti Press Agency, and reveals much that is significant about the two publications that are foci of her case study. Recommended for graduate and undergraduate libraries. J. D. Gillespie Presbyterian College
Reviews
Review Quotes
'œAlthough particularly attractive to those engaged in media studies, the accessible style of Reinventing the Soviet Self is appropriate to those interested in the Soviet Union: from Sovietologists to the general public.'' Canadian Slavonic Papers, Vol 39, 3-4, 1997
'œTurpin writes engaging and interesting prose, free of jargon, gives a valuable accounting of the nominally independent Novosti Press Agency, and reveals much that is significant about the two publications that are foci of her case study.'' Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 1996
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
This work is a study of the role of mass media in political change, specifically the recent changes in the Soviet Union. The output of publications by the USSR to various constituents is analyzed for content and direction. The use of the media to define the new Russia is shown. Those involved in Russian studies, media studies, international studies, and similar fields should be interested in this work.
Table of Contents
Preface
Introduction: Media Theory and Analysis Soviet Political Communication Soviet Media for a Global Audience
Heaven on Earth: Soviet Life under Brezhnev
Perestroika and Diplomacy: Soviet Life under Gorbachev
News as Polemic: Moscow News under Brezhnev
Media Glasnost: Moscow News under Gorbachev Reinventing the Soviet
Self Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem