Catalogue


The wealth of nature [electronic resource] : environmental history and the ecological imagination /
Donald Worster.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1993.
description
x, 255 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0195076249
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1993.
isbn
0195076249
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Book of essays which previously appeared in various journals or books or given as lectures.
catalogue key
13109132
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 221-243) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1993-06-15:
This collection of 16 essays concerns the impact on nature of Judeo-Christian belief, Adam Smith's economic theories, and humankind generally and also offers a historical perspective on the growth of environmental history. A common theme is Aldo Leopold's idea of a ``land ethic.'' Worster shares his own awakening of environmental consciousness, and the essays reflect a diversity of sources and information. Environmental historians must be able to digest and understand data from science as well as other academic disciplines. Worster excels at this task; that, and his forthrightness and willingness to express opinions, make this book a winner. Recommended for both general readers and specialists in the field.-- Patricia Owens, Wabash Valley Coll . , Mt. Carmel, Ill . (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 1993-04-12:
Bancroft Prize-winning historian Worster ( Dust Bowl ) writes with a deep understanding of nature and its place in human affairs. In these lucid, authoritative essays, he ranges through American history to explore the people, ideas and economic developments that have shaped our attitudes and behaviors toward the land. The ecological crisis, he stresses, is `` the crisis of modern culture,'' brought on by modernity's materialism. Several pieces address the roles of population growth, technology and the market economy in the degradation of the environment. Others exhibit a narrower focus, e.g., how Protestantism helped shape John Muir and other environmental reformers. Worster's examinations of the myths and realities behind our interaction with nature provide a needed perspective. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Sixteen thoughtful essays that examine the present and future implications of America's past relationship to the land....Informed and lucid about how we've lost ground in the fight to save our natural resources."--Kirkus Reviews
"Sixteen thoughtful essays that examine the present and futureimplications of America's past relationship to the land....Informed and lucidabout how we've lost ground in the fight to save our natural resources."--KirkusReviews
"This collection of 16 essays concerns the impact on nature of Judeo-Christian belief, Adam Smith's economic theories, and humankind generally and also offers a historical perspective on the growth of environmental history....Environmental historians must be able to digest and understand datafrom science as well as other academic disciplines. Worster excels at this task: that, and his forthrightness and willingness to express opinions, make this book a winner. Recommended for both general readers and specialists."--Library Journal
"This collection of 16 essays concerns the impact on nature ofJudeo-Christian belief, Adam Smith's economic theories, and humankind generallyand also offers a historical perspective on the growth of environmentalhistory....Environmental historians must be able to digest and understand datafrom science as well as other academic disciplines. Worster excels at this task:that, and his forthrightness and willingness to express opinions, make this booka winner. Recommended for both general readers and specialists."--LibraryJournal
"Well-written"--Washington Post Book World
"A collection of well-written articles and essays."--Christian Science Monitor
"A collection of well-written articles and essays."--Christian ScienceMonitor
"Bancroft Prize-winning historian Worster writes with a deep understandingof nature and its place in human affairs....Worster's examinations of the mythsand realities behind our interaction with nature provide a neededperspective."--Publishers Weekly
"Bancroft Prize-winning historian Worster writes with a deep understanding of nature and its place in human affairs....Worster's examinations of the myths and realities behind our interaction with nature provide a needed perspective."--Publishers Weekly
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews, April 1993
Publishers Weekly, April 1993
Library Journal, June 1993
BIOSIS, February 1994
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Hailed as "one of the most eminent environmental historians of the West" by Alan Brinkley in The New York Times Book Review , Donald Worster has been a leader in reshaping the study of American history. Winner of the prestigious Bancroft Prize for his book Dust Bowl , Worster has helped bring humanity's interaction with nature to the forefront of historical thinking. Now, in The Wealth of Nature , he offers a series of thoughtful, eloquent essays which lay out his views on environmental history, tying the study of the past to today's agenda for change. The Wealth of Nature captures the fruit of what Worster calls "my own intellectual turning to the land." History, he writes, represents a dialogue between humanity and nature--though it is usually reported as if it were simple dictation. Worster takes as his point of departure the approach expressed early on by Aldo Leopold, who stresses the importance of nature in determining human history; Leopold pointed out that the spread of bluegrass in Kentucky, for instance, created new pastures and fed the rush of American settlers across the Appalachians, which affected the contest between Britain, France, and the U.S. for control of the area. Worster's own work offers an even more subtly textured understanding, noting in this example, for instance, that bluegrass itself was an import from the Old World which supplanted native vegetation--a form of "environmental imperialism." He ranges across such areas as agriculture, water development, and other questions, examining them as environmental issues, showing how they have affected--and continue to affect--human settlement. Environmental history, he argues, is not simply the history of rural and wilderness areas; cities clearly have a tremendous impact on the land, on which they depend for their existence. He argues for a comprehensive approach to understanding our past as well as our present in environmental terms. "Nostalgia runs all through this society," Worster writes, "fortunately, for it may be our only hope of salvation." These reflective and engaging essays capture the fascination of environmental history--and the beauty of nature lost or endangered--underscoring the importance of intelligent action in the present.
Main Description
Hailed as "one of the most eminent environmental historians of the West" by Alan Brinkley in The New York Times Book Review, Donald Worster has been a leader in reshaping the study of American history. Winner of the prestigious Bancroft Prize for his book Dust Bowl, Worster has helped bringhumanity's interaction with nature to the forefront of historical thinking. Now, in The Wealth of Nature, he offers a series of thoughtful, eloquent essays which lay out his views on environmental history, tying the study of the past to today's agenda for change. The Wealth of Nature captures the fruit of what Worster calls "my own intellectual turning to the land." History, he writes, represents a dialogue between humanity and nature--though it is usually reported as if it were simple dictation. Worster takes as his point of departure the approachexpressed early on by Aldo Leopold, who stresses the importance of nature in determining human history; Leopold pointed out that the spread of bluegrass in Kentucky, for instance, created new pastures and fed the rush of American settlers across the Appalachians, which affected the contest betweenBritain, France, and the U.S. for control of the area. Worster's own work offers an even more subtly textured understanding, noting in this example, for instance, that bluegrass itself was an import from the Old World which supplanted native vegetation--a form of "environmental imperialism." Heranges across such areas as agriculture, water development, and other questions, examining them as environmental issues, showing how they have affected--and continue to affect--human settlement. Environmental history, he argues, is not simply the history of rural and wilderness areas; cities clearlyhave a tremendous impact on the land, on which they depend for their existence. He argues for a comprehensive approach to understanding our past as well as our present in environmental terms. "Nostalgia runs all through this society," Worster writes, "fortunately, for it may be our only hope of salvation." These reflective and engaging essays capture the fascination of environmental history--and the beauty of nature lost or endangered--underscoring the importance of intelligentaction in the present.
Long Description
Hailed as "one of the most eminent environmental historians of the West" by Alan Brinkley in The New York Times Book Review, Donald Worster has been a leader in reshaping the study of American history. Winner of the prestigious Bancroft Prize for his book Dust Bowl, Worster has helped bring humanity's interaction with nature to the forefront of historical thinking. Now, in The Wealth of Nature, he offers a series of thoughtful, eloquent essays which layout his views on environmental history, tying the study of the past to today's agenda for change. The Wealth of Nature captures the fruit of what Worster calls "my own intellectual turning to the land." History, he writes, represents a dialogue between humanity and nature--though it is usually reported as if it were simple dictation. Worster takes as his point of departure the approach expressed early on by Aldo Leopold, who stresses the importance of nature in determining human history; Leopold pointed out that the spread of bluegrass in Kentucky, for instance, created newpastures and fed the rush of American settlers across the Appalachians, which affected the contest between Britain, France, and the U.S. for control of the area. Worster's own work offers an even more subtly textured understanding, noting in this example, for instance, that bluegrass itself was an importfrom the Old World which supplanted native vegetation--a form of "environmental imperialism." He ranges across such areas as agriculture, water development, and other questions, examining them as environmental issues, showing how they have affected--and continue to affect--human settlement. Environmental history, he argues, is not simply the history of rural and wilderness areas; cities clearly have a tremendous impact on the land, on which they depend for their existence. He arguesfor a comprehensive approach to understanding our past as well as our present in environmental terms. "Nostalgia runs all through this society," Worster writes, "fortunately, for it may be our only hope of salvation." These reflective and engaging essays capture the fascination of environmental history--and the beauty of nature lost or endangered--underscoring the importance of intelligent action in the present.
Main Description
Hailed as "one of the most eminent environmental historians of the West" by Alan Brinkley inThe New York Times Book Review, Donald Worster has been a leader in reshaping the study of American history. Winner of the prestigious Bancroft Prize for his bookDust Bowl, Worster has helped bring humanity's interaction with nature to the forefront of historical thinking. Now, inThe Wealth of Nature, he offers a series of thoughtful, eloquent essays which lay out his views on environmental history, tying the study of the past to today's agenda for change. The Wealth of Naturecaptures the fruit of what Worster calls "my own intellectual turning to the land." History, he writes, represents a dialogue between humanity and nature--though it is usually reported as if it were simple dictation. Worster takes as his point of departure the approach expressed early on by Aldo Leopold, who stresses the importance of nature in determining human history; Leopold pointed out that the spread of bluegrass in Kentucky, for instance, created new pastures and fed the rush of American settlers across the Appalachians, which affected the contest between Britain, France, and the U.S. for control of the area. Worster's own work offers an even more subtly textured understanding, noting in this example, for instance, that bluegrass itself was an import from the Old World which supplanted native vegetation--a form of "environmental imperialism." He ranges across such areas as agriculture, water development, and other questions, examining them asenvironmentalissues, showing how they have affected--and continue to affect--human settlement. Environmental history, he argues, is not simply the history of rural and wilderness areas; cities clearly have a tremendous impact on the land, on which they depend for their existence. He argues for a comprehensive approach to understanding our past as well as our present in environmental terms. "Nostalgia runs all through this society," Worster writes, "fortunately, for it may be our only hope of salvation." These reflective and engaging essays capture the fascination of environmental history--and the beauty of nature lost or endangered--underscoring the importance of intelligent action in the present.
Table of Contents
The Nature We Have Lostp. 3
Paths Across the Leveep. 16
History as Natural Historyp. 30
Transformations of the Earthp. 45
Arranging a Marriage: Ecology and Agriculturep. 64
A Sense of Soilp. 71
Good Farming and the Public Goodp. 84
Private, Public, Personal: Americans and the Landp. 95
The Kingdom, the Power, and the Waterp. 112
Thinking Like a Riverp. 123
An End to Ecstasyp. 135
The Shaky Ground of Sustainable Developmentp. 142
The Ecology of Order and Chaosp. 156
Restoring a Natural Orderp. 171
John Muir and the Roots of American Environmentalismp. 184
The Wealth of Naturep. 203
Notesp. 221
Indexp. 245
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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