Catalogue

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Stories in scripture and inscriptions [electronic resource] : comparative studies on narratives in Northwest Semitic inscriptions and the Hebrew Bible /
Simon B. Parker.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, c1997.
description
viii, 195 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0195116208 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, c1997.
isbn
0195116208 (cloth : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
13108290
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 143-170) and indexes.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1998-06:
Parker (Boston Univ.) is a biblical scholar well respected for his meticulous scholarship. In this important volume he draws comparisons and contrasts between biblical narratives and Northwest Semitic inscriptions dating from the late ninth to the sixth century BCE, such as the Mesha inscription from Moab, the fragmentary and controversial Tell Dan inscription, and the Siloam tunnel inscription. Parker offers a detailed literary analysis of the inscriptional materials and then analyzes comparable biblical narratives. Parker's claim--that to understand the distinctiveness of the biblical text we must restrict our comparisons to these kinds of analogous texts--will meet with some resistance among scholars who are convinced of the utility of the comparisons with the mythic-epic literature of the ancient Near East. Based on his analysis of these texts, Parker rejects Robert Alter's judgment that the biblical writers abandoned "the polytheistic genre" in shaping their prose narrative (see his The Art of Biblical Narrative, 1981). An essential volume for all those with a serious interest in biblical narrative and historiography as well as the corpus of contemporary Northwest Semitic inscriptions. Upper-division undergraduate; graduate; faculty. H. O. Forshey; Miami University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"An essential volume for all those with a serious interest in biblical narrative and historiography as well as the corpus of contemporary Northwest Semitic inscriptions."--Choice
"An essential volume for all those with a serious interest in biblical narrative and historiography as well as the corpus of contemporary Northwest Semitic inscriptions."--Choice "Stories in Scripture and Inscriptions is a rewarding book, both for its insights into the storytelling techniques of ancient authors and for its suggestions of how we can use inscriptional materials in our study of the ancient Semitic world."--Bible Review
"An essential volume for all those with a serious interest in biblical narrative and historiography as well as the corpus of contemporary Northwest Semitic inscriptions."-- Choice " Stories in Scripture and Inscriptions is a rewarding book, both for its insights into the storytelling techniques of ancient authors and for its suggestions of how we can use inscriptional materials in our study of the ancient Semitic world."-- Bible Review
"An essential volume for all those with a serious interest in biblical narrative and historiography as well as the corpus of contemporary Northwest Semitic inscriptions."--Choice "Stories in Scripture and Inscriptionsis a rewarding book, both for its insights into the storytelling techniques of ancient authors and for its suggestions of how we can use inscriptional materials in our study of the ancient Semitic world."--Bible Review
"A practical application of orality-literacy interplay is found in Simon Parker's Stories in Scripture and Inscriptions. This work deftly examines several inscriptions that bear on orality and literacy--including a worker's petition, a civil engineer's inscription, and several royalmonumental inscriptions dealing with military campaigns, appeals to divine intervention and descriptions of a miraculous deliverance."--Religious Studies Review
"Parker's fine work goes a long way toward filling [a] void..."--Bibliotheca Sacra
"Stories in Scripture and Inscriptions is a rewarding book, both for its insights into the storytelling techniques of ancient authors and for its suggestions of how we can use inscriptional materials in our study of the ancient Semitic world."--Bible Review
"This is a useful and important discussion of types of literature as found in the Northwest Semitic world."--Denver Journal
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 1998
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
This book compares a variety of biblical narratives with the stories found in several Northwest Semitic inscriptions from the ancient kingdom of Judah and its contemporary Syro-Palestinian neighbors. In genre, language, and cultural context, these epigraphic stories are closer to biblical narratives than any other ancient Near Eastern narrative corpus. For the first time, Parker analyzes and appreciates these stories as narratives and sets them beside comparable biblical stories. Heilluminates the narrative character and techniques of both epigraphic and biblical stories and in many cases reveals their original social context and purpose. In some cases, he is able to shed light on the question of the sources and composition of the larger work in which most of the biblicalstories appear, the Deuteronomistic history. Against the claim that the genius of biblical prose narrative derives from the monotheism of the authors, he shows that the presence or absence of a divine role in each type of story is consistent throughout both biblical and epigraphic examples, and that, when present, the role of the deity is essentially the same both inside and outside the Bible, inside and outside Israel.
Main Description
This book compares a variety of biblical narratives with the stories found in several Northwest Semitic inscriptions from the ancient kingdom of Judah and its contemporary Syro-Palestinian neighbors. In genre, language, and cultural context, these epigraphic stories are closer to biblicalnarratives than any other ancient Near Eastern narrative corpus. For the first time, Parker analyzes and appreciates these stories as narratives and sets them beside comparable biblical stories. He illuminates the narrative character and techniques of both epigraphic and biblical stories and in manycases reveals their original social context and purpose. In some cases, he is able to shed light on the question of the sources and composition of the larger work in which most of the biblical stories appear, the Deuteronomistic history. Against the claim that the genius of biblical prose narrativederives from the monotheism of the authors, he shows that the presence or absence of a divine role in each type of story is consistent throughout both biblical and epigraphic examples, and that, when present, the role of the deity is essentially the same both inside and outside the Bible, inside andoutside Israel.
Main Description
This book compares a variety of biblical narratives with the stories found in several Northwest Semitic inscriptions from the ancient kingdom of Judah and its contemporary Syro-Palestinian neighbors. In genre, language, and cultural context, these epigraphic stories are closer to biblical narratives than any other ancient Near Eastern narrative corpus. For the first time, Parker analyzes and appreciates these stories as narratives and sets them beside comparable biblical stories. He illuminates the narrative character and techniques of both epigraphic and biblical stories and in many cases reveals their original social context and purpose. In some cases, he is able to shed light on the question of the sources and composition of the larger work in which most of the biblical stories appear, the Deuteronomistic history. Against the claim that the genius of biblical prose narrative derives from the monotheism of the authors, he shows that the presence or absence of a divine role in each type of story is consistent throughout both biblical and epigraphic examples, and that, when present, the role of the deity is essentially the same both inside and outside the Bible, inside and outside Israel.
Table of Contents
Abbreviationsp. xi
Introduction: Reading Biblical and Other Ancient Near Eastern Narrativesp. 3
Approaches to Biblical Narrativesp. 3
Biblical and Ancient Near Eastern Narrativesp. 6
Oral Storytelling in Ancient Israel and Judahp. 8
The Stories Treated in This Bookp. 11
Petitionary Narrativesp. 13
The Mesad Hashavyahu Inscriptionp. 15
Petitionary Narratives in the Biblep. 18
2 Kings 8:1-6p. 18
2 Kings 4:1-7p. 19
1 Kings 3:16-27p. 20
2 Kings 6:24-30p. 24
2 Samuel 14:1-23p. 26
1 Kings 20:38-42p. 30
2 Samuel 12:1-7p. 31
Summaryp. 35
The Story of the Siloam Tunnelp. 36
The Siloam Tunnel Inscriptionp. 37
Stories of the Siloam Tunnel in the Biblep. 39
2 Kings 20:20ap. 40
2 Chronicles 32:30ap. 41
Ben Sirach 48:17p. 41
Summaryp. 42
Stories of Military Campaignsp. 43
Stories of Military Campaigns in Inscriptionsp. 44
The Inscription of Meshap. 44
The Tel Dan and Sefire Inscriptionsp. 58
Summaryp. 59
Stories of Military Campaigns in the Biblep. 60
2 Kings 13-14p. 61
Joshua 10p. 66
2 Samuel 8p. 68
Excursus: 2 Samuel 10p. 73
Summaryp. 74
Stories of Appeals for Military Interventionp. 76
Stories of Appeals for Military Intervention in Inscriptionsp. 78
The Inscription of Kilamuwap. 78
The Inscription of Bir-Rakib for His Father Panamuwap. 83
Stories of Appeals for Military Intervention in the Biblep. 89
Historiographic Accountsp. 89
Didactic Literary Accountsp. 99
Summaryp. 102
Stories of Miraculous Deliverance from a Siegep. 105
The Inscription of Zakkurp. 106
Stories of Miraculous Deliverance from a Siege in the Biblep. 112
2 Kings 18:13-19:37p. 113
2 Kings 6:24-7:20p. 120
2 Kings 3:4-27p. 124
Summaryp. 127
Conclusion: The Roles of the Stories and the Role of the Dcityp. 131
The Literary Character of the Storiesp. 131
The Transmission of the Storiesp. 135
The Role of the Deity in the Storiesp. 137
Notesp. 143
Bibliographyp. 171
Index of Ancient Sourcesp. 183
General Indexp. 190
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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