Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

A nation transformed by information [electronic resource] : how information has shaped the United States from Colonial times to the present /
editors, Alfred D. Chandler, Jr., James W. Cortada.
imprint
Oxford [England] ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2000.
description
xii, 380 p., [12] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0195127013 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Oxford [England] ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2000.
isbn
0195127013 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
13106088
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 301-361) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2001-04-01:
The idea that information plays a vital role in the operation of the modern US economy will be readily if not universally accepted. But, as this interesting book reveals, information has played a central role for far longer than may be generally realized or acknowledged. This collection of essays exposes how Americans have long pursued and invested in the infrastructures and technologies that first defined and then expanded the role of information. Chandler (emer., Harvard) and Cortada (IBM) not only contribute to but also create a logically integrated and careful narrative that illustrates several of the cultural, political, and economic consequences that the handling and transmission of information portends for people and society. By placing the Information Age in its historical context, this work is able to explain not only its current significance but also why this is not a recent phenomenon. From the initiation and development of the US postal system to newspapers, books, and pamphlets, to telegraphs and railroads, to telephony, motion pictures, and ultimately to big and small computing, this is a compelling and fascinating story that deserves attention and contemplation. Chandler and Cortada have produced a delightful history that will enlighten a variety of readers. Highly recommend for general readers, undergraduate and graduate students, and faculty. T. E. Sullivan; Towson University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A grand story, stretching from colonial newspapers to the Internet. Information has been a driving force in American for 300 years, and anyone who wants to understand its role today would be well advised to read this book."--Hal Varian, University of California at Berkeley "The chapters of this wonderful book take us through two centuries of technological, economic, and business history. The description and analysis of the present context and how it is likely to evolve is as rich as the historical analysis of the factors molding the use of information in the American economy in earlier years. What a treat!"--Richard R. Nelson, Columbia University "This book provides a marvelous demonstration that the information didn't spring full blown from the creators of the world wide web, but has roots that reach back over three hundred years. The creation, propagation, and dissemenation of information has been a central characteristic of American life since the establishment of printing presses in multiple centers of the colonial economy. Through a well linked set of essays going forward through technological systems including the post office, the telegraph, the telephone, accounting and filing, radio, motion pictures, to computers and the internet, both the continuities and the discontinuities are made apparent. The several authors engage not only their readers, but each other as well. A Nation Transformed by Information is important reading not only for historians, but for anyone who wants to understand the age of dot.com."--Sheldon Hochheiser, Corporate Historian, AT&T "This collection represents a timely and accomplished effort to provide invaluable historical perspectives on the long road to America's contemporary, information-rich society. Readers will rapidly appreciate that the Information Age, for all its novelty, has emerged from durable private- and public-sector commitments to broadening and speeding this nation's information flows."--Philip Scranton, Rutgers University and Hagley Museum and Library
"A grand story, stretching from colonial newspapers to the Internet. Information has been a driving force in American for 300 years, and anyone who wants to understand its role today would be well advised to read this book."--Hal Varian,University of California at Berkeley "The chapters of this wonderful book take us through two centuries of technological, economic, and business history. The description and analysis of the present context and how it is likely to evolve is as rich as the historical analysis of the factors molding the use of information in the American economy in earlier years. What a treat!"--Richard R. Nelson, Columbia University "This book provides a marvelous demonstration that the information didn't spring full blown from the creators of the world wide web, but has roots that reach back over three hundred years. The creation, propagation, and dissemenation of information has been a central characteristic of American life since the establishment of printing presses in multiple centers of the colonial economy. Through a well linked set of essays going forward through technological systems including the post office, the telegraph, the telephone, accounting and filing, radio, motion pictures, to computers and the internet, both the continuities and the discontinuities are made apparent. The several authors engage not only their readers, but each other as well.A Nation Transformed by Informationis important reading not only for historians, but for anyone who wants to understand the age of dot.com."--Sheldon Hochheiser, Corporate Historian, AT&T "This collection represents a timely and accomplished effort to provide invaluable historical perspectives on the long road to America's contemporary, information-rich society. Readers will rapidly appreciate that the Information Age, for all its novelty, has emerged from durable private- and public-sector commitments to broadening and speeding this nation's information flows."--Philip Scranton, Rutgers University and Hagley Museum and Library
"A grand story, stretching from colonial newspapers to the Internet. Information has been a driving force in American for 300 years, and anyone who wants to understand its role today would be well advised to read this book."--Hal Varian, University of California at Berkeley "This collectionrepresents a timely and accomplished effort to provide invaluable historical perspectives on the long road to America's contemporary, information-rich society. Readers will rapidly appreciate that the Information Age, for all its novelty, has emerged from durable private- and public-sectorcommitments to broadening and speeding this nation's information flows."--Philip Scranton, Rutgers University and Hagley Museum and Library
"A grand story, stretching from colonial newspapers to the Internet.Information has been a driving force in American for 300 years, and anyone whowants to understand its role today would be well advised to read thisbook."--Hal Varian, University of California at Berkeley "This collectionrepresents a timely and accomplished effort to provide invaluable historicalperspectives on the long road to America's contemporary, information-richsociety. Readers will rapidly appreciate that the Information Age, for all itsnovelty, has emerged from durable private- and public-sector commitments tobroadening and speeding this nation's information flows."--Philip Scranton,Rutgers University and Hagley Museum and Library
"An exciting history of information media, this book captures the dizzying rise of technology in this country, from early newspapers through contemporary times with the advent of the computer."--Dallas Morning News
"An exciting history of information media, this book captures the dizzyingrise of technology in this country, from early newspapers through contemporarytimes with the advent of the computer."--Dallas Morning News
"Chandler and Cortada not only contribute to but also create a logically integrated and careful narrative that illustrates several of the cultural, political, and economic consequences that the handling and transmission of information portends for people and society....this is a compelling andfascinating story that deserves attention and contemplation. Chandler and Cortada have produced a delightful history that will enlighten a variety of readers.--"Choice
"Chandler and Cortada not only contribute to but also create a logicallyintegrated and careful narrative that illustrates several of the cultural,political, and economic consequences that the handling and transmission ofinformation portends for people and society....this is a compelling andfascinating story that deserves attention and contemplation. Chandler andCortada have produced a delightful history that will enlighten a variety ofreaders.--"Choice
"One of several interesting studies that have come out in the past two or three years putting our present [information] transformation into a historical context....Where the essays link innovations in communication with social and economic trends, the book is at its best."--TheEconomist
"One of several interesting studies that have come out in the past two orthree years putting our present [information] transformation into a historicalcontext....Where the essays link innovations in communication with social andeconomic trends, the book is at its best."--The Economist
"The chapters of this wonderful book take us through two centuries of technological, economic, and business history. The description and analysis of the present context and how it is likely to evolve is as rich as the historical analysis of the factors molding the use of information in theAmerican economy in earlier years. What a treat!"--Richard R. Nelson, Columbia University
"The chapters of this wonderful book take us through two centuries oftechnological, economic, and business history. The description and analysis ofthe present context and how it is likely to evolve is as rich as the historicalanalysis of the factors molding the use of information in the American economyin earlier years. What a treat!"--Richard R. Nelson, Columbia University
"This book provides a marvelous demonstration that the information didn't spring full blown from the creators of the world wide web, but has roots that reach back over three hundred years. The creation, propagation, and dissemenation of information has been a central characteristic of Americanlife since the establishment of printing presses in multiple centers of the colonial economy. Through a well linked set of essays going forward through technological systems including the post office, the telegraph, the telephone, accounting and filing, radio, motion pictures, to computers and theinternet, both the continuities and the discontinuities are made apparent. The several authors engage not only their readers, but each other as well. A Nation Transformed by Information is important reading not only for historians, but for anyone who wants to understand the age of dot.com."--SheldonHochheiser, Corporate Historian, ATandT
"This book provides a marvelous demonstration that the information didn'tspring full blown from the creators of the world wide web, but has roots thatreach back over three hundred years. The creation, propogation, anddissemenation of information has been a central characteristic of American lifesince the establishment of printing presses in multiple centers of the colonialeconomy. Through a well linked set of essays going forward through technologicalsystems including the post office, the telegraph, the telephone, accounting andfiling, radio, motion pictures, to computers and the internet, both thecontinuities and the discontinuities are made apparent. The several authorsengage not only their readers, but each other as well. A Nation Tranformed byInformation is important reading not only for historians, but for anyone whowants to understand the age of dot.com."--Sheldon Hochheiser, CorporateHistorian, ATandT
"We've been living in a networked society a lot longer than you think....Our long history as a networked society is explored in depth in A Nation Transformed by Information....Fascinating....[The anthology] sets out to show that Americans have lived in something like an information age almostfrom the country's very beginning....The book's great strength is the rich historical context it provides for the rise of networked computers, a context so often lacking in contemporary discussions of a networked society and its many implications. The book also excels at exploring the uniquelyAmerican factors that have made the U.S. such fertile soil for information technologies of every stripe....Much in this volume should be required reading for anyone involved in an Internet venture....One of the most important new books anyone in the information racket can read."--Daniel Akst, TheIndustry Standard
"We've been living in a networked society a lot longer than youthink....Our long history as a networked society is explored in depth in ANation Transformed by Information....Fascinating....[The anthology] sets out toshow that Americans have lived in something like an information age almost fromthe country's very beginning....The book's great strength is the rich historicalcontext it provides for the rise of networked computers, a context so oftenlacking in contemporary discussions of a networked society and its manyimplications. The book also excels at exploring the uniquely American factorsthat have made the U.S. such fertile soil for information technologies of everystripe....Much in this volume should be required reading for anyone involved inan Internet venture....One of the most important new books anyone in theinformation racket can read."--Daniel Akst, The Industry Standard
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 2001
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Tracing the information age back to the 1600s, the contributors to this study argue that American society has benefitted from innovation in the transfer of information and that modern systems are merely an extension of the roads and mail system.
Long Description
This book makes the startling case that North Americans were getting on the "information highway" as early as the 1700s, and have been using it as a critical building block of their social, economic, and political world ever since. By the time of the founding of the United States, there was a postal system and roads for the distribution of mail, copyright laws to protect intellectual property, and newspapers, books, and broadsides to bring information to a populace that was building a nation on the basis of an informed electorate. In the 19th century, Americans developed the telegraph, telephone, and motion pictures, inventions that further expanded the reach of information. In the 20th century they added television, computers, and the Internet, ultimately connecting themselves to a whole world of information. From the beginning North Americans were willing to invest in the infrastucture to make such connectivity possible. This book explores what the deployment of these technologies says about American society. The editors assembled a group of contributors who are experts in their particular fields and worked with them to create a book that is fully integrated and cross-referenced.
Main Description
This book makes the startling case that North Americans were getting on the "information highway" as early as the 1700's, and have been using it as a critical building block of their social, economic, and political world ever since. By the time of the founding of the United States, there was a postal system and roads for the distribution of mail, copyright laws to protect intellectual property, and newspapers, books, and broadsides to bring information to a populace that was building a nation on the basis of an informedelectorate. In the 19th century, Americans developed the telegraph, telephone, and motion pictures, inventions that further expanded the reach of information. In the 20th century they added television, computers, and the Internet, ultimately connecting themselves to a whole world of information. From the beginning North Americans were willing to invest in the infrastructure to make such connectivity possible. This book explores what the deployment of these technologies says about American society. The editors assembled a group of contributors who are experts in their particular fieldsand worked with them to create a book that is fully integrated and cross-referenced.
Main Description
This book makes the startling case that North Americans were getting on the "information highway" as early as the 1700's, and have been using it as a critical building block of their social, economic, and political world ever since. By the time of the founding of the United States, there was a postal system and roads for the distribution of mail copyright laws to protect intellectual property, and newspapers, books, and broadsides to bring information to a populace that was building a nation on the basis of an informed electorate. In the 19th century, Americans developed the telegraph, telephone, and motion pictures, inventions that further expanded the reach of information. In the 20th century they added television, computers, and the Internet, ultimately connecting themselves to a whole world of information. From the beginning North Americans were willing to invest in the infrastructure to make such connectivity possible. This book explores what the deployment of these technologies says about American society. The editors assembled a group of contributors who are experts in their particular fields and worked with them to create a book that is fully integrated and cross-referenced.
Main Description
This book makes the startling case that North Americans were getting on the "information highway" as early as the 1700's, and have been using it as a critical building block of their social, economic, and political world ever since. By the time of the founding of the United States, there was a postal system and roads for the distribution of mail, copyright laws to protect intellectual property, and newspapers, books, and broadsides to bring information to a populace that was building a nation on the basis of an informed electorate. In the 19th century, Americans developed the telegraph, telephone, and motion pictures, inventions that further expanded the reach of information. In the 20th century they added television, computers, and the Internet, ultimately connecting themselves to a whole world of information. From the beginning North Americans were willing to invest in the infrastructure to make such connectivity possible. This book explores what the deployment of these technologies says about American society. The editors assembled a group of contributors who are experts in their particular fields and worked with them to create a book that is fully integrated and cross-referenced.
Unpaid Annotation
By the time of the founding of the United States, there was a postal system and roads for the distribution of mail, copyright laws to protect intellectual property, and newspapers, books, and broadsides to bring information to a populace that was building a nation on the basis of an informed electorate. In the 19th century, Americans developed the telegraph, telephone, and motion pictures, inventions that further expanded the reach of information. In the 20th century they added television, computers, and the Internet, ultimately connecting themselves to a whole world of information. From the beginning North Americans were willing to invest in the infrastructure to make such connectivity possible. This book explores what the deployment of these technologies says about American society.
Table of Contents
Contributors
The Information Age in Historical Perspective
Introduction
Early American Origins of the Information Age
Recasting the Information Infrastructure for the Industrial Age
Business Use of Information and Technology during the Industrial Age
The Threshold of the Information Age: Radio, Television, and Motion Pictures Mobilize the Nation
Progenitors of the Information Age: The Development of Chips and Computers
Information Technology Management Since 1960
Computers in U.S. Households Since 1977
The Information Age: Continitiesand Differences
Notes
Bibliographic
Essay on the Role of Information in the Transformation of the United States
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem