Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Kings & prophets [electronic resource] : monarchic power, inspired leadership, & sacred text in biblical narrative /
Cristiano Grottanelli.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1999.
description
x, 210 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0195071964 (acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1999.
isbn
0195071964 (acid-free paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
13105180
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
Interesting and significant essays reflecting an intimate familiarity with a wide range of ancient near Eastern and classical materials
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
These essays focus on the subject of kingship in the ancient world. They explore the ways in which centralized state power, as epitomized by the sacred king, encounters other oppositional forms of power, including religious discourse.
Long Description
The nature and meaning of kingship has been hotly debated by anthropologists and scholars of religion since the middle of the last century, and the richness of this topic is by no means exhausted. In this fascinating book, comprising a series of published and unpublished essays, Grottanelli focuses on the subject of kingship in the ancient world. The essays explore the ways in which centralized state power, as epitomized by the sacred king, encounters other oppositional forms of power, such as those possessed by prophets, tricksters, and women. Grottanelli's special concern is the way in which mythic narratives and other forms of religious discourse both reflect this tension and play a role in the historic struggles between these competing forms of power. As the first book-length presentation of the work of a brilliant and innovative thinker, this book should hold great interest for scholars across a variety of disciplines, including religious studies, anthropology, and classics.
Long Description
This collection of essays examines the respective religious and social functions of kings and prophets as they are presented in the biblical narratives. Biblical kingship is easily shown to be a specific instance of an ancient and widespread institution--sacred monarchy--that was the pivot of most state organizations throughout antiquity; prophetic authority is described as a typical institution of ancient Hebrew society. The difference between monarchy and prophecy is radical, because the former implies a hereditary power and is upheld by its subjects who feed their kings with taxes, while the latter derives its authority from allegedly direct divine inspiration, and though it is also economically dependent it is not explicitly presented as being based upon systematic exploitation. Cristiano Grottanelli interprets the rise of prophecy as a consequence of a crisis of monarchical structures at the beginning of the Iron Age, and connects it to similar phenomena attested in ancient Greek texts derived from a similar crisis. Though monarchy finally won the day in the Ancient Mediterranean in a new imperial form, the new literatures in Greek and Hebrew consonantic and alphabetic scripts shaped nonmonarchic figures to which they attributed some of the functions previously pertaining to monarchy. These new literatures, produced by two cultures that were both highly literate and organized according to nonmonarchical principles, diverged radically in their development and final outcomes. In the Hebrew tradition, monolatry and an official canon of sacred writings were the final result; the prophetic principle was thus overcome by a new ideological construction, centered upon inspired scriptures rather than upon the impromptu performances of inspired persons. In using the prophetic principle against the monarchic, the canonical texts paradoxically shaped their own authority above that of living prophets.
Main Description
This collection of essays examines the respective religious and social functions of kings and prophets as they are presented in the biblical narratives. Biblical kingship is easily shown to be a specific instance of an ancient and widespread institution--sacred monarchy--that was the pivot ofmost state organizations throughout antiquity; prophetic authority is described as a typical institution of ancient Hebrew society. The difference between monarchy and prophecy is radical, because the former implies a hereditary power and is upheld by its subjects who feed their kings with taxes,while the latter derives its authority from allegedly direct divine inspiration, and though it is also economically dependent it is not explicitly presented as being based upon systematic exploitation. Cristiano Grottanelli interprets the rise of prophecy as a consequence of a crisis of monarchical structures at the beginning of the Iron Age, and connects it to similar phenomena attested in ancient Greek texts derived from a similar crisis. Though monarchy finally won the day in the AncientMediterranean in a new imperial form, the new literatures in Greek and Hebrew consonantic and alphabetic scripts shaped nonmonarchic figures to which they attributed some of the functions previously pertaining to monarchy. These new literatures, produced by two cultures that were both highlyliterate and organized according to nonmonarchical principles, diverged radically in their development and final outcomes. In the Hebrew tradition, monolatry and an official canon of sacred writings were the final result; the prophetic principle was thus overcome by a new ideological construction,centered upon inspired scriptures rather than upon the impromptu performances of inspired persons. In using the prophetic principle against the monarchic, the canonical texts paradoxically shaped their own authority above that of living prophets.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. v
Abbreviationsp. ix
Introductionp. 3
Notesp. 9
The King's Grace and the Helpless Womanp. 11
Notesp. 26
Religious Ideals and the Distribution of Cereal Grains in the Hebrew Biblep. 31
Notesp. 40
The Enemy King is a Monster a Biblical Equationp. 47
Notesp. 69
The Story of Deborah and Barak a Comparative Approachp. 73
Charismatic Possession and Monarchic Rationalization the Folly of Saulp. 87
Conclusionsp. 100
Specialists of the Supernatural in the Hebrew Biblep. 111
Notesp. 124
Healers and Saviors of the Eastern Mediterranean in Preclassical Timesp. 127
Notesp. 144
Biblical Narrative and the Ancient Novel Common Motifs and Themesp. 147
Notesp. 162
Prophecy and Writing in the Ancient Near Eastp. 173
Notesp. 182
Making Room for the Written Lawp. 185
Notesp. 200
Indexp. 203
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem